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Posts Tagged ‘newspapers’

News On Paper Towels? Yeah, It’s A Thing Now

Like a throw back to the days of ripping the latest headlines off the wire, one newspaper in Mexico has come up with a fun and unexpected way to put the paper back in newspaper — with paper towels!

Check out this video from agency FCB Mexico about the fun campaign by free newspaper Más por Más, which according to the video literally prints the latest headlines ON paper towels as they come out of the dispenser. They put a QR code on the sheets, and report a significant increase in visitors to their website from the novel hand wipes (which were made with a special ink that didn’t smear).

Fun AND functional? You bet!

See more of the details about the creatives behind this idea on Creativity.
(H/T PSFK)

Mediabistro Course

Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now!

How to Make Online Content Less Interactive, But Better

The joke’s on us, guys. I couldn’t help laughing out loud and passing around a recent article from The Onion this week. The headline “Internet Users Demand Less Interactivity” caught my eye. The satirical piece contained gems like this quote:

Every time I type a web address into my browser, I don’t need to be taken to a fully immersive, cross-platform, interactive viewing experience,” said San Diego office manager Keith Boscone. “I don’t want to take a moment to provide my feedback, open a free account, become part of a growing online community, or see what related links are available at various content partners.

Har-har. Go ahead. Read the whole thing, I’ll wait.

Now back to business. As much as our jobs depend on curating those cross-platforms and creating sharable content, things are only funny when they’re true right? I think there are lessons to be learned from being the butt of the joke. Here’s how to keep those snarky Onion writers happy:

1. Use Video Only When It’s Compelling

Many of my colleagues working at hometown papers have been handed small digital cameras in the past years and an order from higher ups to have accompanying video for their stories and columns. We all have to be reporters, video producers, audio editors, among other things, these days. But video only works when it’s compelling. For it to be compelling, you need more training than the two afternoons in the conference room with the tech guy. Many of us are good writers and good video editors. Just as many people are not. (Full disclosure: I am not.) There is a huge difference between knowing how to put together a nice video from filming to finishing touches, and really feeling, embracing, the medium. I want to propose that while adapting is good, and learning to use Final Cut or even iMovie is a must, if you know it’s just not your thing: rebel.  Read more

Would You Watch A Newspaper Reality Show?

Like many work places, newsrooms often come with a set of stereotypical cast members. From the clueless out-of-town editor brought in by corporate to the cub reporter seeking a scandal in every story he covers to the this-trial-ain’t-my-first-rodeo cops reporter to the no-nonsense city editor. (I said stereotypical, didn’t I?)

That makes this announcement that NBC put out a casting call for local newspapers to be at the center of a potential reality show — shared in a posting on the National Newspaper Association website — both unsurprising and exciting. I can totally see how a newsroom could make for a good show — there’s deadline pressure, there’s quirky characters (inside and outside the newspaper), there’s always something new. It will be interesting to see how a “documentary-style reality show” would play out when much of the day in a community newspaper isn’t really dramatic. Sure, there are election nights and breaking news, but not every day, especially in a small-town paper, which seems to be their target. Jim Romenesko posted about the casting and has more details and responses to the idea.
Read more

Tablets May Fuel Print Magazine Market, Report Says

A report released earlier this week by the United Kingdom’s Professional Publishers Association (PPA) reveals that tablet users are engaging with digital magazines. No surprise, right?

What is interesting about this report, though, is that the PPA also notes that there appears to be a “positive correlation between print and tablet readership.” In fact, according to the report, 96 percent of tablet owners have read a PRINTED magazine in the last year, compared to the 80 percent national average.

Read more

MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry on the Death of New Orleans Newspapers

In the latest Mediabistro interview, MSNBC host and New Orleans native Melissa Harris-Perry talks about the state of journalism and the decline of print. For her, the loss of The Times-Picayune is not just bad for the Crescent City, but bad for democracy, because “there have to be some spaces where we can say, ‘I believe that because it’s reported by that person.’” Below, an excerpt:

“I not only sometimes hear viewers’ angst about wanting journalistic reporting, I feel it myself as somebody consuming the news. I report and analyze what’s going on in the news, but I also want to know what’s happening in the world. For me, that angst is primarily about newspapers. I live in New Orleans, where we’ve lost our daily newspaper and don’t have reporters on the beat in our neighborhoods… When I think about [the decline in unbiased news], I tend to not think about it in terms of television news, which I never particularly watched, but print journalism.”

Read more in So What Do You Do, Melissa Harris-Perry, MSNBC Host and Tulane University Professor?

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