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Posts Tagged ‘POLITICO’

Listicles vs. Journalism: Mashable’s Jim Roberts Talks Apocalypsticles

apocalypsticalAt Social Media Week NYC, our sister blog SocialTimes caught up with some notable digital journalists at a panel hosted by The Wall Street Journal. The panelists weighed in on a piece in Politico that criticized certain web-based publications for turning violence into clickbait:

The Kyiv protests were also starting to look like clickbait. By the end of the day on Wednesday, Business Insider, Talking Points Memo, Buzzfeed and Mashable had all published their own listicle versions of what Huffington Post called “Ukraine Crisis: 12 Apocalyptic Pictures After Nation’s Deadliest Day.” High in resolution, low on explanation, the articles painted Ukraine’s carnage by numbers.
 
A new genre had been born: the apocalypsticle.

“I was outraged by [the Politico piece]… It bothered me personally because I had invested a lot of real dollars in covering that story since December,” said Mashable’s executive editor and chief content officer Jim Roberts at the panel.

Here, he talks more about the publication’s coverage of the crisis: Read more

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Why Are Digital News Orgs Getting Into Print?

print magazinesIn a strange twist of events, popular digital news publishing orgs are starting to put out print magazines as an attempt to earn a revenue and increase brand awareness.

No, it’s not an Onion-type hoax. It’s a true story. Capital New York, a leading political and media news blog, was bought by Politico this fall, and the magazine is the first of many steps to increase — well, I don’t really know what.

According to AdAge, it’s part of Capital’s expansion after being bought by Politico. When you think Washington D.C. news, you think Politico. And they want you to think of Capital when you think of New York. Politico itself announced that it would publish a glossy six times a year and popular music site Pitchfork publishes a quarterly Pitchfork Review, available by subscription or for around $20 per issue.

A quarterly for a music website makes sense in terms of brand and scaling their product. Sort of like McSweeney’s. But Capital will print monthly, with current editors overseeing the content. The first run will have, again according to AdAge:

… a run of about 8,000 copies, the company said, with plans to distribute about 6,000 copies in Manhattan and 2,000 in Albany. Copies will be delivered to the state capitol building in Albany, City Hall in Manhattan and key individuals in the industries Capital New York covers, according to Roy Schwartz, chief revenue officer at Capital New York and Politico.

The magazine will be free, Mr. Schwartz added, with subscriptions available upon request to those who “qualify” based on their job title, job responsibilities, or other criteria.

Doesn’t it just sound like a very labor intensive marketing campaign?

I guess that’s why “digital first” is how we refer to pubs and not digital only. But I’d to find out how effective rags like this can really be in terms of brand engagement and advertising revenue.

Can it be worth the trouble or is this about leftover, hopeful thinking, that a print version will ever make a difference? Tweet your thoughts @10,000Words or share in the comments. 

As POLITICO Branches Out in Print, Harper’s Enters the Mobile World

politico_01In a somewhat counterintuitive twist, POLITICO, which has budded into an authority on Washington-based politics since its digital inception in 2007, has launched a print magazine.

And in contrast, a much older high culture, arts and trends magazine (the second-oldest continuously published magazine in the U.S.) — Harper’s Magazine — has finally entered the mobile arena with an iOS app.

POLITICO Magazine isn’t the organization’s first dabbling into print — it publishes a decent-sized daily newspaper on Capitol Hill happenings (but that can also be read online). Still, the mag, which will be published six times a year, promises to fulfill a different need.

Editor Susan B. Glasser cites a need for contextual, deeply-reported stories as the organization’s reasoning for incurring the cost and time necessary to produce a print product.

Read more

No Reader Left Behind: What’s Wrong With a $1,000 Subscription?

It’s nice when a news blog grows up. If you don’t live in New York, or care about its politics, you’ve probably never heard of Capital New York, which was recently bought by Politico. And there’s plans to juice it up, in the style of Politico Pro, by charging an estimated $1,000 yearly subscription. Talk about a paywall.

This is good, because the quality of journalism over at Capital is first rate. It’s already a “must read” for political junkies here. And Politico is on point about using the ‘freemium’ model to make their brand of news a money tree.

But when you make something so exclusive that only Michael Bloomberg can really afford it, how does that fit into the mission of a news blog like Capital, whose mission is, according to their site (emphasis mine):

Capital is an online news publication about how things work in New York, founded in 2010. We report on important local people and institutions, with the aim of sustaining a conversation with a knowing audience about things they don’t already know.

There’s something to be said for running a publication and making it this valuable. But I’m still an idealist. What happens when the cheap content for the poor, but knowing audiences, starts to stink because it’s not profitable? The New York Times costs almost $200 a year, and even they’re launching cheaper products. I’m glad there’s options in terms of business models. I’m just scared about this one.  

 

Image via AMC

Columbia Journalism Review’s News Frontier Database

News Frontier Database

While mainstream media organizations are migrating online to establish their presence, digital news organizations are springing up to reach an audience hungry for the latest news. Some of these digital news organizations are making big news too, such as The Huffington Post’s OffTheBus Citizen Journalism Program. The Columbia Journalism Review recently created a database of these digital organizations, including original reporting on this new digital journalism landscape. It’s called The News Frontier Database.

Recently I had a chance to talk with Columbia Journalism Review staff writer Michael Meyer about the News Frontier Database and its current uses.

Read more

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