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Posts Tagged ‘print’

Back to School Links: 3 Pieces New (and Old) Journos Should Wrap Their Heads Around

adrevenueIt’s back to school season, which means there will be a lot of journalism students sitting around debating how to best make money doing it. We just can’t stop wondering or examining how it’s all changed. The discussion isn’t just happening in ivory towers, either. In the past week, current journos and editors at large have been pondering it as well:.

  • David Plotz took to to his Twitter feed to tweet out all of the options. Then, he did the right thing and just compiled them into this post on Slate.  What’s interesting is how 2014 compares to 1998. He could only think of five good ways to raise money — banner ads, being the biggest earner. Now? With membership models like Slate’s Plus, podcasts and conferences, things are just more complicated, but hardly as bleak. 

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Highlights from the Newsweek Staff’s Reddit AMA

newsweekAMAThe Newsweek staff did a Reddit AMA today. Jim Impoco, editor-in-chief, Kira Bindrim, managing editor, Alex Leo, head of product for IBT Media, Grant Burningham, homepage editor and Kate Gardiner, director of audience engagement, were all taking questions on a wide range of themes.

If you take away anything, it should be that Impoco has a way with words — in that he uses very, very few. And that the new team is excited about their product, the state of the media, serious journalism and are willing to defend it against cynical redditors.

Herewith, some highlights:

On The ‘New Regime’ of Newsweek

Leo: New approach is all about serious investigation, giving the reader real context (something missing at many news orgs) and having the best/last word not necessarily the first.

Impoco: It’s no longer a smart take on last week’s news. We prefer deeper dives into the important stories of the day…Investigative journalism is us — we’ve got some of the best in the business.

Bindrim: We can’t be Newsweek without accepting the connotations that name already has for people, and we would be remiss to ignore the magazine’s history. That history is a big part of why so many of us are excited about being a part of this relaunch. But neither do we want to pretend that this isn’t in fact a relaunch. We hear critiques of what Newsweek was or is every day, and it would be silly of us to take over a publication without also taking the opportunity to address some of those critiques. It’s why we like talking to readers, and why a forum like this one is valuable….I’m sure Newsweek’s past editorial leadership had reasons for choosing the covers or coverage they did, and it’s true that Jim and the rest of us can’t speak to those decisions. All we can say is that we’re listening to the feedback and making sure our current strategy takes it into consideration.

On Info-tainment, Buzzfeed, and Justin Bieber:

Bindrim: This always feels to me like asking about the difference between great literature and Twilight, or great films and Michael Bay. People are always going to want entertainment, and info-tainment is certainly a byproduct of that. I think as a news outlet, you have to find a balance, and every outlet is going to have different standards. For us, the goal is to never sacrifice quality for clicks….I do think news outlets have an obligation to present the most important news, and I think it’s safe to say Bieber isn’t that. But Americans also have a lot of options: Reuters, Al Jazeera, BBC and others all have the Ukraine in prominent positions on the homepage right now. The real news is out there if you can tear yourself away from the Biebs. Read more

Why Are Digital News Orgs Getting Into Print?

print magazinesIn a strange twist of events, popular digital news publishing orgs are starting to put out print magazines as an attempt to earn a revenue and increase brand awareness.

No, it’s not an Onion-type hoax. It’s a true story. Capital New York, a leading political and media news blog, was bought by Politico this fall, and the magazine is the first of many steps to increase — well, I don’t really know what.

According to AdAge, it’s part of Capital’s expansion after being bought by Politico. When you think Washington D.C. news, you think Politico. And they want you to think of Capital when you think of New York. Politico itself announced that it would publish a glossy six times a year and popular music site Pitchfork publishes a quarterly Pitchfork Review, available by subscription or for around $20 per issue.

A quarterly for a music website makes sense in terms of brand and scaling their product. Sort of like McSweeney’s. But Capital will print monthly, with current editors overseeing the content. The first run will have, again according to AdAge:

… a run of about 8,000 copies, the company said, with plans to distribute about 6,000 copies in Manhattan and 2,000 in Albany. Copies will be delivered to the state capitol building in Albany, City Hall in Manhattan and key individuals in the industries Capital New York covers, according to Roy Schwartz, chief revenue officer at Capital New York and Politico.

The magazine will be free, Mr. Schwartz added, with subscriptions available upon request to those who “qualify” based on their job title, job responsibilities, or other criteria.

Doesn’t it just sound like a very labor intensive marketing campaign?

I guess that’s why “digital first” is how we refer to pubs and not digital only. But I’d to find out how effective rags like this can really be in terms of brand engagement and advertising revenue.

Can it be worth the trouble or is this about leftover, hopeful thinking, that a print version will ever make a difference? Tweet your thoughts @10,000Words or share in the comments. 

The Magazine Turns to Kickstarter to Fund A Collection of Stories


We’ve already discussed how the media is increasingly turning to crowdfunding as a source of financing.  The Magazine, an all-digital pub focused on non-fiction reporting and essays (about a variety of geeky topics), is the latest outlet to hop on the crowdfunding bandwagon.

The editors decided to start a Kickstarter campaign to raise money for a print and eBook featuring a selection of writing from their first year. As of this writing, the campaign has earned $31,015 and they have nine days to go to reach their goal of $48,000.

10,000 Words spoke with executive editor Glenn Fleishman (via email) about his reasons for using Kickstarter: ”We had a lot of options at our disposal, including soliciting pre-orders directly over whatever period of time we chose until we reached a set amount,” Fleishman said. “Without a call to action, however, it’s hard to get people to pull the trigger unless you’re very popular and have something timely as well as compelling. We felt that crowdfunding would let us show our cards: We need to raise this much to pay everyone involved and produce a good-looking book.” Read more

Tablets May Fuel Print Magazine Market, Report Says

A report released earlier this week by the United Kingdom’s Professional Publishers Association (PPA) reveals that tablet users are engaging with digital magazines. No surprise, right?

What is interesting about this report, though, is that the PPA also notes that there appears to be a “positive correlation between print and tablet readership.” In fact, according to the report, 96 percent of tablet owners have read a PRINTED magazine in the last year, compared to the 80 percent national average.

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