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Posts Tagged ‘Robert Hernandez’

‘Post-Mobile’ Is Inevitable: Why Journalists Shouldn’t Dismiss Google Glass

glassBeing cranky and snowed in on the east coast, I was ready to remain skeptical when talking to Robert Hernandez, USC Annenberg journalism professor, about his work with Google Glass and what news orgs could do with them. But his determination to explore what he calls ‘post-mobile’ tools and how journalists can use them convinced me. I (almost) want a pair, once they’re more stylish and I don’t have to talk to them, which will happen, according to Hernandez.

“When have we as an industry ever benefited by dismissing or feeling above an emerging technology?” he asks.

From the internet itself, to blogging, or micro-blogging, or mobile, you’d think we’d have learned our lesson by now. The debate shouldn’t be about when it’s going to catch on or how dorky they look or how people don’t want to talk to themselves to find information. It’s about getting in there and finding out how we might start to use the technology.

Google Glass isn’t the best iteration of itself , but the ‘post-mobile’ world is inevitable, he says, “and if its inevitable what are the features that you want?” He’s calling it post-mobile or micro-content:

I was going to call it ‘light content’ but I know haters will think of ‘fluffy’ content. The premise of Google Glass is that it doesn’t affect your life…it’s not an immersive thing, it’s about eliminating the time, those seconds, of pulling out your phone and unlocking it and searching. Is that good or bad? I’m not going there.”

He’s right. Think about when Twitter came out and we all rolled our eyes over 140 characters. Read more

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The Debate Rages On: Do Journalists Need To Code?

Do journalists need to know HTML? What about CSS? Javascript? … Python?

The debate rages on, with the flame fueled again this week by journalist Olga Khazan writing about how she resented the time she spent learning how to write bad code in journalism school instead of doing something more in-line with her specific career goal of writing. Her article for The Atlantic led to Twitter debates for and against. The merry go round of yes, no, maybe goes round and round and round.

hernandezquoteI’d join the fray (beyond my comments on Twitter earlier this week) except that I think Robert Hernandez, an accomplished web journalist who actually also teaches at the j-school that writer attended, does a great job explaining why learning code (or at least exposure to it) matters for journalists. As he writes: I’ve had an incredible career because I learn the power behind the phrase “Hello World.” Or as he says later in the post in reference to j-school students who don’t want to learn, “It’s 2013 — are you really arguing against learning technology?” Read more

An Experiment with Google+ Hangouts and Code Year

What happens when you combine Codeacademy’s Code Year and Google+ Hangouts? Robert Hernandez is hoping it equals a bunch of journalists learning to code together.

“This is a group DIY Project, where we learn together, teach each other and support our growth,” wrote Hernandez, a professor at the USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, on the Learn Code for Journalism with Me site. “My goal here is for all of us to grow and improve journalism.”

The experimental project seems to be a good one, so far. Almost 100 people have signed up for it, including some professors from Medill, a competitor to USC. While Hernandez is still working out the specifics, the general plan is to have classes start in April and meet regularly in pre-scheduled weekly Google+ Hangouts to work on a lesson together.

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Will Byliner Save Longform Journalism?

byliner

Let’s face it: Readers’ attention spans aren’t getting any longer. We are used to receiving news in sound bites or, in recent years, 140 characters or less. This does an injustice to investigative or longer news pieces. Enter Byliner and The Atavist, two tools that have the potential to bring back longform journalism.

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