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Posts Tagged ‘second screen’

The New, Convoluted Life Cycle Of A Newspaper Story

News must be really hard to follow for an everyday consumer of a newspaper website. First tweets go out, sometimes with no links to additional coverage. Then a few grafs go up on a blog, followed by additional updates, either to the top of that post or as new posts. Eventually, a print story gets started, which is posted through an entirely different workflow onto a different-looking story page. This version is usually written as an hourglass-style narrative, following typical print conventions. For the rest of the day, new updates start going to this story rather than the original blog post. Having a hard time following? Here’s a graphic to help:

As a reader, this is confusing because:

  1. I don’t know where to start or end
  2. When I jump into the story somewhere in the middle gray area, I don’t know where to go to get previous coverage or the full picture
  3. To continue following the story, I don’t know where to look
  4. When I look at all this content as a whole, I don’t know where the newest information is. Read more
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How ESPN and The New York Times Build A Second Screen For Readers

Above, Patrick Stiegman of ESPN speaks, accompanied by Brian Hamman (center) and Tyson Evans, both of The New York Times.

BOSTON — At the Online News Association Saturday morning, Brian Hamman and Tyson Evans of The New York Times and Patrick Stiegman of ESPN hosted a session about how to dominate the “second screen” experience (you can follow the discussion from conference attendees here).

The second screen is literally what it sounds like — the screen readers look at in addition to the TV. This could be an iPad, a laptop or a phone.

According to Stiegman’s stats about Internet consumers, 85 million Americans consume both TV and the web simultaneously. This provides a huge opportunity for news organizations to serve fans in real time, alongside live events.

For an organization like ESPN, “owning the second screen” means getting readers’ eyes online and on the web for the same events. For The New York Times, this means competing with coverage primarily dominated by TV networks to provide additional engagement and information. Read more