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Posts Tagged ‘SEO’

How Your Google+ Profile Can Help Your Articles Links Stand Out

By now, you’ve probably noticed that when you search on Google, sometimes the articles in the results pop up with a person’s headshot and link to their Google+ page.

Case in point:
google search with authorship

How did I make that happen? I dusted off Google Plus and added myself as a contributor to the publications I write for.

Basically, this tells Google a human being — YOU! — wrote this piece of content. And it shows your face and how many people you’re connected to — again, my Google+ profile is a bit dusty so not too impressive, but it’s enough to establish I’m not just a spambot. I have legitimate connections and a full-fledged profile.

It’s really simple, too. There are two ways to establish authorship, but start by putting a decent headshot on your Google+ account (well, I guess start by creating and filling out the Google+ account if somehow you’ve made it this far without it). Then add the pages you contribute to your profile. You can do this by…
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Mediabistro Course

Nonfiction Book Proposal

Nonfiction Book ProposalStarting September 4,work with a literary agent to complete a full proposal that wins an agent and a contract! Ryan Harbage from The Fischer-Harbage Agency, Inc. will teach you how to convey your idea in a winning book proposal format, write your proposal letter, understand the nuts and bolts of the nonfiction book industry, and more. Register now! 

What Really Happens To Your SEO Rankings When You Change Your Name (Graph)

Three months ago, I married my best friend. There was no doubt I’d personally take his last name, but as I blogged about this summer, I was less sure about changing my byline to take his name professionally as well.

For a myriad of reasons, I did in fact change over my byline and every account I could think to change. That’s why my byline where I could change it now says Meranda Adams. My Google+, My Twitter, My Facebook, My LinkedIn, My Pinterest, etc. etc. etc. They all dropped Watling and gained Adams.

I Googled myself to see how I’m doing in gaining traction on the other Meranda Adamses of the Internet (the top one happens to live in my same metro area, which is unfortunate). When I search, my Twitter handle pops up first. Half of the links on the first page of results are ME. I felt pretty good about how the transition was going, confident I’d quickly regained my prime rankings.

But then a colleague and I were playing around with some of the Google Webmaster tools, and I saw a graph that literally made my jaw drop. All I could say was “Wow.” His immediate reaction? “What the hell happened on Sept. 16?”
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In The Age of SEO, How Do You Change Your Name After Marriage?

In all of my preparations for my recent wedding, I didn’t plan for this one question that still lingers over me unsettled more than a week after the pastor pronounced me a wife in late July. How will changing my last name affect my SEO and search engine placement? Is it even OK to change my name professionally in the age of SEO?
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Upworthy Shares Memes That Make You Think, Not Just Laugh

There’s more to the Internet than LOLcats and dating sites. Sometimes surfing the Internet feels like swimming in an ocean of viral videos and vitriol. I’d like to say news sites are a tropical island in the middle, but too often they promote or fuel the storms. That’s why, Upworthy, seems refreshing and, well, worthy of sharing.

It’s premise? Find the things worth sharing and make those viral. The site, which David Carr of the New York Times profiled this week (Two Guys Made a Web Site, and This Is What They Got), makes no bones that it has an agenda — so while you may not lean as left as the founders appear to — the idea of making things worth knowing as shareable and visual as an Oatmeal comic, animated GIF or LOL cat is nice.

From Carr’s piece, because he explains it better than I can:

“Upworthy, a news aggregation site that began publishing on March 26, is serious news built for a spreadable age, with super clicky headlines and a visually oriented user interface. Eli Pariser, the former executive director of MoveOn.org, and Peter Koechley, a former managing editor of The Onion who also worked at MoveOn, noticed that much of the media that gets shared online is built on cute animals and dumb humans that are good for a laugh, but not much else.”

Or from UpWorthy’s site a, what else, graphical representation of what they’re trying to do:

 

By applying the same sorts of visual pow, social media acrobatics and SEO-friendly tactics news sites, and every site worth its salt online, tries to employ, the site attempts to make things that matter easy and fun to share. That gives you venn diagrams like the one above and headlines that beg to be clicked through, such as What Does Congress Spend Half Of Its Time On? (an infographic look at the fundraising necessary to run for office these days); Yes, Facebook Will Be On The Final Exam (another infographic, but about a new study on how time on Facebook doesn’t necessarily cause less study time); and Smoking Does WHAT To Your Breasts? 5 More Reasons Not To Smoke (a video describing reasons beyond the whole lung cancer thing not to light up).

It will be interesting to see how the site grows and what other innovative ways they find to promote causes or need-to-know information. Already it’s gaining followers, and judging from its Facebook wall, plenty of likes/shares. As a journalist trying to produce serious work (but with a soft spot for animal memes), I appreciate the attempt to raise the profile of stories, videos and graphics that make me think, not just laugh.

Skyrocket to the Top with These SEO Tips

seo.jpgIf Google were high school, the top of the search results page would be the popular kids’ table. With everyone wanting to take a seat, it is essential for writers to distinguish themselves from the competition and improve their article’s SEO, which can be done in five simple steps:

1. Know Your Keywords
When it comes to optimizing your article for search, keywords are key. These are the words or phrases that best and most specifically identify the focus of your piece. Your two to three primary keywords should match the words or phrases potential readers would be plugging into a search engine to find just such an article.

But knowing your keywords is only half the battle — where and how often you place them into your article is crucial. For more tips, read 5 Ways to Improve Your Article’s SEO. [subscription required]

Andrea Hackett

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