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Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Why Are Only 60% of Journalists on Twitter?

ajr.jpgCan we talk about something? It looks like 2008 is calling and they want their newsrooms back. The American Journalism Review posted a piece this week with the headline “Some Newspapers to Staff: Social Media Isn’t Optional, It’s Mandatory.”

Everyone take a deep breath. It’s not totally ridiculous: The piece, written by Mary Ann Fischer, discusses the various ways newsrooms get editors and reporters on social media, how it’s hard to call it “mandatory,” and how social media guidelines should be “living breathing documents.”

All true.

Also, Dean Baquet hasn’t tweeted yet. But that’s not the worst of it. Fischer writes:

 Nearly 60 percent of journalists were on Twitter in 2013, according to a survey done by Oriella PR Network. San Francisco Chronicle managing editor Audrey Cooper said the lack of social media activity is more pronounced among print journalists. “If you look at your average newspaper editor, they don’t have thousands of followers like the editors of BuzzFeed,” she said. “As a group we tend to have not embraced digital media as much. That’s not good or bad, but it does raise the question of how do you perform in that space if you’re not a user of digital media.”

I just don’t know what to say aside from, hey, print people: It’s time to quit the boycott.

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Muck Rack Adds Feature to Track Social Shares

muck-rack-bannerAre you a certified Muck Rack journalist? If you aren’t, you should be. It’s like a portfolio site, news feed, and job board all in one (and the daily newsletter isn’t too shabby either). No, I’m not on their payroll, but they run the one Twitter chat I can stand, and just came out with a new feature for journos to track their success on social media. It’s not exactly Chartbeat, but as a verified journo or Muck Rack Pro user, you can create PDF reports about your social shares.

I know — PDF reports? But it does acknowledge a real truth for journos in smaller markets where publishers still talk about the legacy of print and are frustrated by the transient nature of all things digital. (Oh, wait. That happens in New York, too.)

Sometimes it’s nice to have it on paper. You can bring it to a job interview for reference, slap it down on your editor’s desk when she questions your ability, or just hang it up on the newsroom refrigerator to taunt your coworkers. There are a lot of uses for PDFs.

There are even more uses to have a Muck Rack account though. It’s a nice little hub on the interwebs, so take some time this weekend to play around with it. You don’t have to generate PDFs all day to make it worthwhile.

Your Twitter Chat Is Stressing Me Out

twitter logoTwitter is stressing me out. It all culminated this weekend when I wanted to waste some time on an Amtrak train, but couldn’t focus. The journo chatter was too loud. Jacob Harris seemed to understand me:

But while he seemed ambivalent about the noise, it was making me properly anxious. Not only is the conference streaming in my feed, but then you’re having inter-conference #chats, too. Of course, this could be a personal problem. I’ll disclose that because of some family matters, I’ve had to take a step back from being plugged in 24 hours a day. Since I’m not forced to post, write, or respond to news like I normally do, maybe the noisiness is more obvious to me. I can’t use it right now, therefore it is meaningless. That might be too easy of an out.

The thing is, we journalists talk too much. I like following Twitter chats — #mucked up or #wjchat — until I actually follow them. At some point in refreshing my feed and discerning what you’re trying to say about advertising and wearables in your MT of a RT of an A1 to Q2 I give up and go see what @unfoRETTAble is watching. Read more

Everything Upworthy Can Teach Journalists

upworthyThis week, New York magazine has a profile of the website we all love to hate: Upworthy.

Upworthy is the bane of many a journalist’s existence. It peddles in clicks, and has people sharing, painlessly and by the millions, pieces of content that concern topics we actually want to report on. A 10-page feature or package with video on the effects of poverty takes months to prepare and weeks to garner attention on Twitter. They find one video on the topic and it has thousands of views. It’s  more BuzzFeed-y than BuzzFeed; they at least have a news team. You should read the whole piece, though, because there are lessons to be gleaned from their success.

1) Ah, the infamous Upworthy style headline. In one part of the feature, they talk about ‘click testing,’ where they run through possible headlines and then see how clickable they are out in the wild. If it’s not clickable, they tweak. Every media outlet can do this, and if you want to garner more traffic, you should. If you feel icky about changing the headline after it’s originally published, just add a note. I see good digital outlets doing this all the time. Slate stories, for example, often have one headline when I see it in the morning and another by the afternoon when I actually get around to reading it. If it requires emails or write offs to tweak a headline or re-run and write a new social media tease to make it more interesting — you’re doing it wrong. Read more

Gearing Up For SXSWi: How to Organize Your Online Presence With RebelMouse

5480020f0cbc7867c4dd1cc1d6839498cfd22e6443be3d3885fc60878062a841Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, WordPress, LinkedIn — sometimes it’s just all too much to keep up with, especially when you’re reporting for your publication remotely and expected to keep social media followers in the loop. And with 30,000 people in the media and technology industries descending on Austin this weekend (March 7-11, more specifically) to recount the mass knowledge dump and hundreds of sessions that comprise SXSW Interactive, social reporting from the field can feel impossible.

That’s where RebelMouse comes in.

If you’re struggling to organize your digital presence and find it stressful to bounce back and forth across a dozen social media platforms, download the app ASAP.

RebelMouse’s purpose is pretty simple. The iOS app allows you to manage all of your social media handles in one spot and in real-time while you’re on assignment, and all of your feeds are updated from a pretty, personalized RebelMouse website. You can use the app’s free offering or pay more for features like enhanced branding and access to Google analytics. While it was developed to help local businesses save time on posting social updates and serve as an alternative to building an expensive website, I’m convinced RebelMouse’s main function (aggregating) is the key to making the life of a reporter and publisher easier.

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