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Posts Tagged ‘Study’

4 Ways to Build Sustainable Journalism Startups

Renaissance Journalism Center

In the current media landscape where online startups are looking to fill the void left by wilting traditional media, starting a business is only the beginning. Though first steps are important, many startups are starting to face problems in sustaining their enterprises. This is what a new study by the Renaissance Journalism Center seeks to understand. The study surveyed 32 media startups to see what challenges they are facing in terms of preserving and obtaining funds. What can we learn from these findings to help build sustainable journalism startups?

1. Be on the lookout for new sources of revenue

Most of the startups surveyed (71.9 percent) are non-profits that received initial funding in the form of foundation grants. But grants are more difficult to obtain for existing sites so many of the organizations are finding themselves short of resources. Foundations are more interested in funding new journalistic experiments, not helping existing ones survive. That means startups need to be resourceful: build relationships with local journalism experts from schools, trade organizations, and angel investor groups. Communicating with similar startups can encourage idea sharing about new streams of revenue.

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Study: Behavior Of News Organizations On Twitter ‘Resembles The Early Days Of The Web’

Thirteen major news organizations. One week in February. More than 3,600 tweets. And only 1 percent of those tweets sent followers to another news site.

That’s perhaps the most striking finding in a study released yesterday by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism and The George Washington University’s School of Media and Public Affairs.

The researchers, Jesse Holcomb, Kim Gross and Amy Mitchell, concluded that Twitter is mostly being used as a promotional vehicle for news organizations:

This behavior resembles the early days of the web. Initially, news organizations, worried about losing audience, rarely linked to content outside their own Web domain. Now, the idea is that being a service-of providing users with what they are looking for even if it comes from someone else-carries more weight. It bears watching whether Twitter use for mainstream news organizations evolves in this same way.

I couldn’t agree more. Especially the last sentence. Linking outside of your website is commonplace now. It’s like a gentleman’s agreement of sorts actually. It goes something like this: you linking to my website is great for search engine optimization, so when I have a reason to link back to your website I’ll do the same thing. Read more

Tablet Users Unwilling to Pay for News… Will They Change?

A new study by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism and The Economist Group found that consuming news was one of the most popular activities for tablet users. The study also found that out of tablet users who regularly read the news, three out of 10 of them spent more time consuming news than they did before they got a tablet. Four out of 10 regularly read in-depth news and analysis. These are promising figures for the future of digital news and the tablet.

But the figures came with one pitfall: “News is valued but willingness to pay is low.” The majority of tablet owners (85 percent) had never paid for news on their tablet, and 78 percent said that news on the tablet was not worth more than any other medium. Out of those who had not already paid for news, only 21 percent would agree to pay $5 a month for their favorite tablet news source. Most turned down the $5 charge, even if it were the only way to access it.

So who are those lovely people paying for news? Read more

Why You Should Not Use Third-Party Apps For Facebook Posting

It’s worth spending that extra time to post to your Facebook page, a new study says.

Facebook posts that are posted via a third-party app like HootSuite, TweetDeck, dlvr.it and others receive an average of 70 percent fewer likes and comments for each fan, according to a new study by Applum. Read more

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