GalleyCat FishbowlNY FishbowlDC UnBeige MediaJobsDaily SocialTimes AllFacebook AllTwitter LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser

Posts Tagged ‘tablet’

3 Micropublishing Platforms to Start Your Publication

The world of publishing is treacherous. Today, coming up with enough capital to fully staff, produce and publish a magazine is a daunting task — and making a profit off of it is almost impossible.

But, it turns out, a new trend is rising that could help startup magazines produce, and even monetize, new and interesting digital content. Although micropublishing is not new — its roots date back into the book industry, when small Print On Demand books would get published — it has been an increasingly lucrative concept as more of the general public owns eReaders and tablets.  And, while its become popular among authors to produce micro-stories on platforms such as Kindle Singles, journalists now have the opportunity to ride micropublishing’s wave. Startups are scrambling to create proprietary CMS and publishing platforms that encourage anyone to produce a magazine.

Here is just a sampling of some of the different ways you can bring a digital edition of your startup publication to the hands of readers. They have different prices and limitations, but they should help you get thinking about whether micropublishing is right for you.

What do you think of micropublishing as a concept? Let us know in the comments.

1.  Zeen: Micro-Micro Publishing

If your work is less of a magazine and more of a one-off long read or a compendium of short articles with a single, then Zeen is the right choice for your micropublishing needs. Currently in Beta, Zeen is a free micropublishing website that enables users to input their own content, enrich it with multimedia (including pictures, video and maps), and lay it out in a “zine-like” digital format for publish to social media accounts or a personal blog. Read more

Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Tablets May Fuel Print Magazine Market, Report Says

A report released earlier this week by the United Kingdom’s Professional Publishers Association (PPA) reveals that tablet users are engaging with digital magazines. No surprise, right?

What is interesting about this report, though, is that the PPA also notes that there appears to be a “positive correlation between print and tablet readership.” In fact, according to the report, 96 percent of tablet owners have read a PRINTED magazine in the last year, compared to the 80 percent national average.

Read more

Publishing Your News Content to Google Currents

Google Currents

Here on 10,000 Words, we’ve shown you a few tips on how to define your newsroom’s mobile presence, as well as some other helpful tips for reaching news junkies on the second screen. A recent report from the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism showed that 53% of tablet owners are daily news consumers. And while the iPad still dominates the tablet marketplace, Android tablets are popping up all over the place this holiday season from manufacturers like HTC, Motorola, and Samsung. Even Amazon has recently entered the fray with their own Android-powered tablet device: the Kindle Fire. Google continues their rapid-fire push into the tablet arena with their latest application: Google Currents.

Google Currents allows users to browse their favorite magazines, newspapers and websites in an attractive and elegant format. Google has joined with over 150 publishing partners to offer content, including Saveur, Popular Science, Fast Company, ProPublica, Forbes, The Atlantic, and more. Consumers have over 180 editions of formatted content to choose from once they download the app to their Android or iOS device. But the best thing about Google Currents is that anyone can create their editions for the app. Google has created an intuitive self-service platform that gives you the ability to customize, brand and style your Google Currents edition to match your organization or website. (Note: the Google Currents app is only available in the US, but users worldwide can create their own editions.)

Create a new edition

Read more

Are ‘Lean-Back’ Apps the Way to Go?

Roy Greenslade at The Guardian recently conducted an interview with Andrew Rashbass, the “chief suit” of The Economist. As the chief executive, Rashbass’ commercial story “turns out to be more of a digital story,” even with their impressive print circulation numbers.

Rashbass draws a distinction between the “lean-back, immersive, ritual pleasure” that comes from reading The Economist in print, to the “lean-forward, interactive” way that people use the website. He was previously in charge of The Economist’s website, and its own research found that readers were eager to build a community and have discussions on the web. Read more

Tablet Users Unwilling to Pay for News… Will They Change?

A new study by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism and The Economist Group found that consuming news was one of the most popular activities for tablet users. The study also found that out of tablet users who regularly read the news, three out of 10 of them spent more time consuming news than they did before they got a tablet. Four out of 10 regularly read in-depth news and analysis. These are promising figures for the future of digital news and the tablet.

But the figures came with one pitfall: “News is valued but willingness to pay is low.” The majority of tablet owners (85 percent) had never paid for news on their tablet, and 78 percent said that news on the tablet was not worth more than any other medium. Out of those who had not already paid for news, only 21 percent would agree to pay $5 a month for their favorite tablet news source. Most turned down the $5 charge, even if it were the only way to access it.

So who are those lovely people paying for news? Read more

NEXT PAGE >>