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Posts Tagged ‘The Guardian’

Kickstarter Launches Journalism-Focused Category

journokickstarterToday, Kickstarter announced that it will be giving journalism projects their very own space. So whether you want to fund a magazine or a reporting adventure, you have a place to do it.

Along with the subcategory, The Guardian announced that they will manage their own curated page of projects. There are over 900 journalism focused projects, so it’s nice to have someone organize them for you. For good reason, too. On the main Journalism page, stories about drones, Iran at the World Cup, and bitcoin explainers are shown alongside “When a Ginger Travels Abroad.” On the Guardian‘s page, most of the projects are already funded — like the automated FOIA requests from the CIR. But there are still causes you can get behind, like this “shamelessly retro” paper delivery service in San Franciso. Of course.

Have a journalism project on Kickstarter? Tweet them to us @10,000Words or share in the comments.

Image via Kickstarter

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Behind the Scenes at The Guardian During the Edward Snowden Era

snowden_1370814166862_426887_ver1.0_320_240The Guardian has gotten more press in the past year than ever before. This is of course thanks to one Edward Snowden (Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras helped too). News outlets dutifully reported on the NSA leaks with fervor, but for media junkies, the real story went on behind the scenes. Read more

The Guardian Already Has An In-House Tool for “Attention Analytics.” Do You?

orphanWhile Upworthy was busy writing their “down with the pageview” manifesto yesterday, it turns out that the Guardian’s been using attention analytics it since an in-house hack day, when web architect Graham Tackley and digital audience manager Chris Moran decided that they wanted to see real time data to help manage the SEO for The Guardian’s ”400 pieces of content” a day, according to this piece by Ciara Byrne on Fast Company.

Here’s how it evolved from a took on one man’s desktop, to a newsroom-wide tool called Orphan, according to Byrne’s piece:

[Tackley] tailed the logs on to a couple of servers, pushed it to a messaging queue, and created a Scala Play Framework app to consume and display the data on a dashboard…Word got around and more and more Guardian employees started to use Tackley’s dashboard, now named Ophan. Tackley decided to upgrade it to capture the Guardian’s entire click stream, which generates between 15 million and 25 million events a day and store the data for seven days. This meant moving from his desktop to Amazon Web Services…A JavaScript hidden pixel on the website now records every event instead of retrieving it from the logs and places it in a message queue. Since there were now too many events to hold in-memory, an app called Serf takes the message queue, extracts what was needed, and inserts it into an ElasticSearch cluster. The dashboard asks the same questions of ElasticSearch, a real-time search and analytics engine, that it had previously posed to the in-memory event list

There are a few lessons to be gleaned from this: Read more

3 Takeaways From Emma & Bill Kellers’ Recent Missteps

66g8uCriticism surrounding a profile of stage 4 breast cancer patient Lisa Bonchek Adams has been mounting since Guardian writer Emma Keller published a controversial piece Jan. 8, and her husband, New York Times columnist and former executive editor Bill Keller seemed to sympathize with her position in a follow-up.

Adams has been chronicling musings and insights about her illness, sometimes painfully honest, through her personal blog and Twitter for some time now. Keller’s story about Adams, in which she wonders aloud about the “ethics” of tweeting about an incurable, aggressive sickness, as well as Bill Keller’s column, are in poor taste. So much so that the Guardian has removed the original story and begun an “investigation.”

In thinking about this whole unfortunate debacle, I’d like to consider some potential lessons:

1. Just because you can editorialize doesn’t mean you should.

Read more

New WikiLeaks Doc We Steal Secrets Examines the ‘Transparency Machine’

The saga of WikiLeaks and Bradley Manning presents many questions for digital journalists. We Steal Secrets, a documentary directed by Alex Gibney and set for release  this May, deals with them all. You can watch a trailer here.

You should see the film — even if you think you’ve already heard all you need to know about Wikileaks, even if you’ve already made up your mind. It not only covers the creation of Wikileaks, the fall of Julian Assange as a hacker-god, but includes new interviews with Michael Hayden, former CIA director, and the woman who accused Assange of rape, among many other inside players. However, the most compelling part of the documentary is that it finally puts Bradley Manning in center stage and presents new questions about digital security, sources, and how we protect them.

I used to champion WikiLeaks, and I cringe to admit it, its founder. In a far off graduate school classroom, I even considered the idea that it was a sort of ‘journalistic’ enterprise. But now that Manning has been serving time as an enemy of the state and his trial approaches, I’m finding it hard to focus on anything but him, and the responsibilities publishers assume online, with information and with their sources. Read more

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