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Posts Tagged ‘traffic’

Why Are Only 60% of Journalists on Twitter?

ajr.jpgCan we talk about something? It looks like 2008 is calling and they want their newsrooms back. The American Journalism Review posted a piece this week with the headline “Some Newspapers to Staff: Social Media Isn’t Optional, It’s Mandatory.”

Everyone take a deep breath. It’s not totally ridiculous: The piece, written by Mary Ann Fischer, discusses the various ways newsrooms get editors and reporters on social media, how it’s hard to call it “mandatory,” and how social media guidelines should be “living breathing documents.”

All true.

Also, Dean Baquet hasn’t tweeted yet. But that’s not the worst of it. Fischer writes:

 Nearly 60 percent of journalists were on Twitter in 2013, according to a survey done by Oriella PR Network. San Francisco Chronicle managing editor Audrey Cooper said the lack of social media activity is more pronounced among print journalists. “If you look at your average newspaper editor, they don’t have thousands of followers like the editors of BuzzFeed,” she said. “As a group we tend to have not embraced digital media as much. That’s not good or bad, but it does raise the question of how do you perform in that space if you’re not a user of digital media.”

I just don’t know what to say aside from, hey, print people: It’s time to quit the boycott.

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Everything Upworthy Can Teach Journalists

upworthyThis week, New York magazine has a profile of the website we all love to hate: Upworthy.

Upworthy is the bane of many a journalist’s existence. It peddles in clicks, and has people sharing, painlessly and by the millions, pieces of content that concern topics we actually want to report on. A 10-page feature or package with video on the effects of poverty takes months to prepare and weeks to garner attention on Twitter. They find one video on the topic and it has thousands of views. It’s  more BuzzFeed-y than BuzzFeed; they at least have a news team. You should read the whole piece, though, because there are lessons to be gleaned from their success.

1) Ah, the infamous Upworthy style headline. In one part of the feature, they talk about ‘click testing,’ where they run through possible headlines and then see how clickable they are out in the wild. If it’s not clickable, they tweak. Every media outlet can do this, and if you want to garner more traffic, you should. If you feel icky about changing the headline after it’s originally published, just add a note. I see good digital outlets doing this all the time. Slate stories, for example, often have one headline when I see it in the morning and another by the afternoon when I actually get around to reading it. If it requires emails or write offs to tweak a headline or re-run and write a new social media tease to make it more interesting — you’re doing it wrong. Read more

A Dose of Optimism: J-school Grad Prospects and Website Traffic Growth

There is plenty of evidence for gloom: the newspaper industry is the fastest-shrinking of them all, and the online ad shares of newspapers have sunk to an all-time low. Hopefully, two studies released this week will help lower your blood pressure; auspicious statistics are a rare commodity these days.

As I’ve written about before, studying journalism may not be such a bad idea. A new study from Georgetown University showed that it’s certainly no worse than studying social science, arts, architecture or law and public policy. Recent graduates with journalism degrees had a 7.7 percent unemployment rate (lower than the aforementioned areas of study), with architecture faring the worst at 13.9 percent. Like any other industry, the unemployment rate in journalism decreased with experience and the attainment of a graduate degree. On average, recent grads can expect $32,000, which increases to $58,000 with experience, and $66,000 after graduate studies. The fields with the lowest unemployment rates were health and education, both at 5.4 percent. Read more

Twitter’s Upcoming Web Analytics Tool Will (Hopefully) Cure A Major Headache

Measuring referral traffic is essential for news organizations, or any website owner for that matter. However, there’s always been a major limitation to doing that. Measuring referrals from one of the most popular social networks, Twitter, has proven itself to be a formidable task.

But a long-awaited reprieve is coming. This week, Twitter began rolling out its Web analytics tool. All website owners will have access to the service in a matter of weeks, reports Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman.

The introduction of this tool will provide an official, baseline metric for everyone from news organizations to social media marketers to measure the impact that Twitter has on their websites. Currently, a wide array of often-pricy third-party products like Radian6, bit.ly enterprise and Sprout Social are required to obtain what feels like piecemeal Twitter analytics. Read more