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Posts Tagged ‘Twitter analytics’

ClearVoice Measures and Scores Writers’ Social Influence: How Do You Rank?

imageAnalytics are either your best friend or your worst enemy. And now, there’s a platform to not only track how your work is being shared, but will give you a score. I hate to compare, but ClearVoice, launched in June, is basically a Klout for digital journalists. Anita Malik, Vice President of Content Operations for ClearVoice, says:

There was nothing out there to score content creators and look at what authorship was doing out there in the marketplace and going beyond Google authorship to give brands and publishers a real view of what writers are able to offer in levels of expertise, who’s improving in what area, and who will give them a good voice for their audience.

It works like this: you do a search for your name and the platform pulls up all the indexed sites that you’ve posted on. You claim your work, create a profile, and voila. You have a ClearVoice score. The hope is that you can use that to coerce and editor into paying you more, find more tailored gigs if you’re a freelancer, or just brag to the guy in the next cube that you rule. It’s really up to you how you use it.  Read more

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Which Tweet Wins? See If You Can You Out-Predict A Computer

If you work in social media, or any online media site really, for very long, you learn that it’s hard to predict which post or piece of content will go viral. That doesn’t stop people from trying.

The latest attempt? The New York Times has the details on a collaboration by three computer scientists who developed an algorithm that, with relative accuracy, can tell you which of two tweets to the same content by the same user will more likely be reshared. This is how those developers explain their project:

… [W]e take advantage of the surprising fact that there are many pairs of tweets containing the same url and written by the same user but employing different wording. Given such pairs, we ask: which version attracts more retweets? This turns out to be a more difficult task than predicting popular topics. Still, humans can answer this question better than chance (but far from perfectly), and the computational methods we develop can do better than an average human …

How is that possible? A huge body of data to pull from. In A/B tests, it predicts which tweet will be more popular correctly 67 percent of the time, compared to the 61 percent of tweets more likely to be retweeted that humans guess correctly, according to the NYT. Before you get too depressed, read the full article to see why your computer won’t be replacing you or your social community manager anytime soon.

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Then just for fun: The NYT’s The Upshot takes this idea one step farther and put together this fascinating 25 question gut check to see if YOU can beat their algorithm and predict with more success whether one tweet will go viral or one tweet will go silent.

It’s harder than it sounds! I got 15 vs. the computer’s 19. So what do you get?

Some Findings About Twitter and the News, From Pew Research Center

PJ_13.11.01_twitterNews260A couple of weeks ago we learned how Americans consume news on Facebook, and according to a study released by the Pew Research Center Monday, we now know more about the connection between the news and Twitter — Twitter users are “younger, more mobile and more educated.”

The last study Pew did, along with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, indicated that 30 percent of people actually use Facebook partially as a news source. For Twitter, the number is much lower — eight percent of U.S. adults log in for tweets about news. Only 16 percent of American adults use Twitter at all.

Forty percent of Twitter news consumers hold at least a bachelor’s degree (for Facebook, that number is 30 percent), and nearly half of Twitter news-readers are 18-29 years old, according to Pew.

Amy Mitchell and Emily Guskin with the Pew Research Journalism Project also wrote that the research consisted of Twitter conversation analysis. Here’s what that breakdown revealed: “much of what gets posted centers on passing along breaking news; sentiments shift considerably over time; and however passionate, the conversations do not necessarily track with public opinion,” Mitchell and Guskin wrote. The only somewhat surprising fact among those three is how much the opinions of Twitter users can change over the course of a few days. Pew took ten major news events over the last year (Newtown, the Supreme Courts same-sex marriage hearing, presidential election, etc.) and zeroed in on Twitter users’ sentiments; you can read more about how they came to those conclusions here.

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Twitter’s Upcoming Web Analytics Tool Will (Hopefully) Cure A Major Headache

Measuring referral traffic is essential for news organizations, or any website owner for that matter. However, there’s always been a major limitation to doing that. Measuring referrals from one of the most popular social networks, Twitter, has proven itself to be a formidable task.

But a long-awaited reprieve is coming. This week, Twitter began rolling out its Web analytics tool. All website owners will have access to the service in a matter of weeks, reports Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman.

The introduction of this tool will provide an official, baseline metric for everyone from news organizations to social media marketers to measure the impact that Twitter has on their websites. Currently, a wide array of often-pricy third-party products like Radian6, bit.ly enterprise and Sprout Social are required to obtain what feels like piecemeal Twitter analytics. Read more