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Posts Tagged ‘youtube’

Journos, Meet TubeStart: Subscription Based Crowdfunding

There are lots of reasons that crowdfunding makes sense to journalists. And there are lots of ways to go about it. Alas, there are also drawbacks to what’s become the standard on platforms like Indiegogo or Kickstarter. Mainly it’s the whole deadline, all-or nothing approach to the major platforms. It’s fun and splashy and intense, but it’s also stressful and often just as much work to run a campaign to raise money for a project than it is to actually complete the project.

That’s why Josef Holm and Claude Shires have created TubeStart, a YouTube centric crowdfunding platform. It makes sense for two reasons.

The first is that the audience is there, waiting to be tapped. Instead of making users come to you, you can reach the bazillion (that’s a technical term) users that already viewing content on YouTube.

And you can monetize that content in a sustainable way. That’s the second part. What makes TubeStart unique is that you can raise funds with a subscription model. Holm says, that “fans can subscribe to over many mnths as opposed to running a month long campaign with the stress of making the goal. You can focus on finding funding to sustain your production costs.”

That’s interesting. The hardest thing about making the foray into video content is that it’s an added expense, and it’s still difficult to make it profitable. A local news organization could create daily news shows and ask users to donate, say, $1 a month for the privelage of viewing — and maybe some exclusive bonus content or other perk. This way, your content is paid for, while still remaining free for the general public, and you can make a few cents with Adsense to boot.

The platform launches August 20 and if you sign up now, TubeStart will waive the platform fees.  

Mediabistro Course

Personal Essay Writing

Personal Essay WritingStarting October 28, work with a published journalist to draft, edit, and sell your first-person essays! Jessica Olien will help you to workshop your writing so that it's ready to pitch to editors. You'll learn how to tell your personal story, self-edit you work to assess voice, style, and tone, and sell your essays for publication. Register now!

Get Your Portfolio On: Clippings.me Launches Professional Package

Every summer, I promise that I’m going to use the downtime to get my act together and work on my website and portfolio, and then get lazy about doing all of the work.  That’s why my ears always perk up when I hear about portfolio sites that do all of the hard work for you.

It’s surprising that there aren’t more portfolio building sites targeted at journalists, ones focused on just showcasing your clips, without making you choose background themes and fonts reminiscent of an early MySpace page. But don’t forget about Clippings.me if you, like me, need to get your clips together and don’t have the advanced skills to create your own gorgeous, professional website.

Clippings.me was a pioneer in the market and has just launched a professional package that makes using the site more intuitive and, quite frankly, makes it something you can be proud to link to or use as a digital resume.

The Pro Package runs you $8 per month. You can upload as many clips — print and web articles, video, even podcasts — to your page, as you can with the free version. The perks include being able to host your own domain and have access to social media stats. You can see exactly where your specific clips were shared and commented on, as well as your clippings.me profile.  Read more

Ed Gordon: YouTube is ‘the Future of Broadcasting’

For a journo who has found success with decidedly old-school methods, Ed Gordon has some advice for aspiring broadcasters: get on YouTube. “In today’s world… it’s about producing and owning your content,” he told Mediabistro in the latest installment of So What Do You Do?. Gordon also advises young people with dreams of being on the small screen to “learn where your craft is headed,” and talks about the importance of perseverance when it comes to career success.

“There are a lot of people who’ve given up trying to get on commercial television and have gone to securing their own YouTube channels, and I think, at the end of the day, that’s going to be the future of broadcasting,” Gordon said. “People are just going to put stuff out there. They’re gonna have their own YouTube channels, and eventually you’ll be able to buy things from those channels. But I think one of the things that people have to understand is it takes perseverance.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Ed Gordon, Host of Conversations with Ed Gordon?

Is Journalism Ready For the “Open Interview”?

Would you ever let a subject put your interview on Youtube for everyone to see? That’s what Chad Witacre, the founder of online gift exchange program Gittip requests for each and every one of his interviews — something he likes to call an “Open Interview.”

The philosophy behind an open interview, to Witacre, is supremely simple: as a transparent company with an accessible open source API and clear funding partners, it only makes sense to bring out discussions with the media to the general Internet community and ensure users that there’s literally nothing to hide.

“With journalists I’m much more comfortable requesting openness,” Witacre writes in his article on Medium. “They’re writing for the public record, and it benefits readers and keeps us both honest to have the raw material on record as well.”

Read more

Why Premium Youtube and News Don’t Mix

On the surface, it’s been a huge year for Youtube and its string of premium content providers. The website is becoming bigger, and has recently acquired startup Epoxy to help developers and distributors get their work on the site faster and more frequently. In addition to the rise in Youtube developers like Maker Studios  and Machinima, new premium channels are popping up left and right — fashion and lifestyle network StyleHaul netted $4.4. million in Series A funding this February, and Demand Media’s newcomer Tastemade plans to do the same for food.

But news companies aren’t clamoring to take part in Youtube. In fact, the video company endured a messy breakup last month with Reuters and Wall Street Journal, pulling millions of dollars in funding and laying off more than a dozen contractors in the process. To put it simply: premium Youtube ventures and news do not mix. Read more

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