TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote SocialTimes AllFacebook FishbowlNY FishbowlDC PRNewser 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Online

Samsung’s ‘The Match’ Finally Reaches Its Conclusion

Cheil Worldwide teamed up with production company Psyop for the six minute conclusion to Samsung’s ambitious sci-fi soccer epic, “The Match.” The first episode in the series launched all the way back in November.

“The Match Part 2″ picks up with Earth’s Galaxy 11 team trailing 3-1 at the half, and in need of some serious rallying to defeat the alien team. Of course, it’s hardly a spoiler to give away that the team is up to the task. Samsung wasn’t about to end its month long campaign with an alien apocalypse, as that would hardly help them move product. For those who have been following all along, it’s the ending they were waiting for. While Samsung’s timing is a little questionable — “The Match Part 2″ was released just two days ago as a coda to the World Cup, while “The Match Part 1″ made its debut with the opening of the tournament — it has still seemed to find its audience, with over four million views in two days. We’ve included “The Match Part 1″ as a refresher after the jump. Read more

The Martin Agency Introduces ‘The Hopsons’ for Benjamin Moore

The Martin Agency would like you to “Meet the Hopsons,” a family who live in a giant bouncy house.

The Hopsons fell in love with their neighborhood but, since all the houses have vinyl siding, they assumed they couldn’t paint theirs. Since they love color, this was a problem. The Hopsons came up with an unusual solution and decided to live in a giant bouncy house. And so begin the whacky adventures of “Meet the Hopsons.” At over two minutes the premise, which might have made for a fun 30-second spot, feels stretched far too thin, and it’s not until the last 30 seconds or so that the idea is tied to Benjamin Moore’s Revive paint for vinyl siding. Still, “Meet the Hopsons” is not entirely without some degree of quirky charm. It’s just hard to believe anyone would stick around long enough to see Benjamin Moore’s product presented as the solution. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

Deutsch LA Brings Pop Secret to the ‘MicroRave’

Adweek described Deutsch LA’s “MicroRave” for Pop Secret perfectly as “like a sad, seizure-inducing nightclub for corn,” in a post that also questioned whether it was the worst ad of the year.

Deutsch LA points out, defensively, “This wasn’t intended as an ad, but as a quickie video for social media meant to celebrate the EDC festival happening the weekend we launched it,” which may disqualify it from that title. The premise of the spot (or “quickie video” or whatever you want to call it) is simple: popcorn attend a “MicroRave” complete with blasting electronic music, seizure-inducing lighting, beads of butter-sweat (which doesn’t exactly make Pop Secret seem appetizing) and a trail of kernels sadly waiting to get in. As if that wasn’t enough already, there’s also a 20-minute long “Extended Party Version,” which we’ve included for anyone masochistic enough to attempt to sit through it after the jump.  Read more

Venables Bell & Partners Go ‘West of Expected’ for Skyy Vodka

Venables Bell & Partners have an off-center campaign for Skyy Vodka, introducing the new tagline “West of Expected” for the California brand.

The new campaign sees improv actor Paul Welsh play a spokesman for the brand, lecturing in some kind of planetarium setting and using cosmic terminology as an analogy for drinking/bar culture. In the 30-second “Tipping” for example, Welsh explains that tipping (in this case giving a mouse in a maze a piece of cheese, for some reason) brings order to chaos, forming a connection with the bartender and getting you good service all night. In the similarly-toned “Attraction” a wing lemon (used to exemplify a wing man) bring together opposites: apples and oranges. It’s a strange approach, for sure, but then Skyy Vodka is an unusual brand — a California company with mostly Old World competition. The “West of Expected” tagline fits Skyy perfectly, and leaves room for a wealth of different approaches going forward.

“In the industry as a whole, and especially vodka, everyone is trying to out-cool themselves and appeal to people’s ego and vanity,” VB&P Executive Creative Director Will McGinness told Adweek. “We wanted to push off the industry norms and the Russian or Eastern European vodka companies and do our own thing and celebrate this different kind of vodka.”

Stick around for “Attraction”and credits after the jump. Read more

Can Advertising Change ‘Fauxsumerism?’

Window shopping

One thing posting on AgencySpy has taught us: marketers and creatives love a robust conversation.

On that note, we’d like to bring your attention to an alarming trend that doesn’t seem to show signs of fading away anytime soon: “Fauxsumerism.”

Essentially, those super-valuable Millennials would rather spend countless hours browsing online than ever actually buying anything. Numerous surveys and thought leadership gatherings have been dedicated to turning these perpetual browsers into buyers–but is it really possible?

Read more

W+K, Three Apologize for ‘Holiday Spam’

Wieden+Kennedy have a clever new spot for U.K.-based mobile provider Three, in which the company makes a timely apology.

The 60-second spot sees Three apologize for the rash of “holiday spam” resulting from the company allowing users to utilize their phone in 16 worldwide destinations without any extra cost for calls. texts or data. Three “thought this was a good thing,” but “failed to consider the consequences: the holiday spam,” says a contrite Three representative. It’s a clever approach, employing dry British humor to let Three brag about their coverage while leveraging a cultural phenomenon anyone can relate to. “Holiday Spam” also manages to be memorable without spending much money (it’s basically just one actor and a series of backgrounds). At the conclusion of the spot, viewers are prompted to visit the campaign landing site at stopholidayspam.com, which includes a heat map of spam levels in various locations. The campaign is also supported by the #holidayspam hashtag, a pretty seamless social integration.

Johnny Fearless Promotes First World War Galleries for IWM London

Agency Johnny Fearless teamed up with Aardman Animations (the creators of Wallace & Gromit) to create the above 90-second spot promoting Imperial War Museum London’s First World War Galleries, entitled “Flight of the Stories.”

The First World War Galleries will re-open on July 19th, which marks the start of the Centenary commemorations. “Flight of the Stories” imagines “the journey of personal stories and letters written by those who never left the fields of Northern France during the First World War.” These stories and letters are depicted as a series of quotations, traveling across France and over the English Channel to find their home at the Imperial War Museum London, while accompanied by lines read “from letters and diaries entrusted to the museum by relatives during and at the end of the First World War.” The effect is striking, with Aardman drawing inspiration from the art of the period and combining 2D illustrations with 3D CGI animation.

“We wanted to bring people to IWM London to see and hear the words of those who lived and died through the war for themselves and encourage them to reappraise the First World War in a way, which is different to the stereotypical mud and blood imagery,” explained Paul Domenet, executive creative director, Johnny Fearless.

“Flight of the Stories” will run online and in cinemas as part of a multimedia campaign including posters, press and radio. Stick around for credits and a “making of” feature after the jump. Read more

A Vulgar Elizabeth Hurley Stars in Droga5′s ‘If We Won’ for Newcastle

Elizabeth Hurley gets vulgar in the latest addition to Droga5′s “If We Won” campaign for Newcastle, which imagines how much better America would be if Great Britain had won the Revolutionary War.

The campaign kicked off last week, with a humorous spot featuring Stephen Merchant. Hurley’s spot borrows a bit from that one, as it devotes quite a bit of time to how many great curse words we’d have at our disposal had we remained British, something Merchant touched on in the original “If We Won.” Still, we suppose the subject doesn’t hurt from further exploration, and the video has over 300,000 views since being uploaded earlier today as people seem to be amused by seeing Hurley stringing together British expletives. Hurley’s 39-second video is just part of the wealth of material put out by Droga5 for the campaign, which also includes Zachary Quinto in a pair of spots and a second appearance from Merchant, who explains how his British accent helps him appear intelligent and get laid. If you’re wondering what American actor Zachary Quinto is doing in this campaign, you’ll just have to watch the video, along with the second Merchant spot, after the jump. Read more

Great Guns Filmtracks Santigold for Pepsi

Production company Great Guns mixes molotov cocktails and soccer in their filmtrack for Santigold’s “Kicking Down Doors,” part of Pepsi’s Beats of the Beautiful Game visual album.

For Santigold’s filmtrack, director Andy Morahan was inspired by “The Christmas Truce,” a soccer-fueled temporary peace that took place between English and German forces on Christmas Day, 1915. “The English and German soldiers put down their guns and played some football in No Man’s Land,” explains Morahan. “I was thinking of a way to try and tell that story in a modern light. Obviously I didn’t have the budget for a war scene, but a riot was more reasonable as a severe stand-off between people. It’s showing football, and sport by extension, as this beacon for humanity.”

In the film, a riot breaks out, with molotov cocktail wielding forces squaring off against riot police. A group of boys falls asleep at the edge of the scene. When one of their balls makes its way into the heart of action, both sides throw down their arms and beginning playing an impromptu pickup game. It’s not a bad idea for a World Cup spot, but seems a bit stretched out as an over four minute music video — although you may feel differently if you actually enjoy the song.

Morahan filmed the scene in Kiev, which has seen its share of rioting in recent history, although he insists the location was chosen purely out of convenience. “I was in Prague and wanted to shoot it there but the budget wouldn’t fit, so we were only an hour flight from Kiev and I’d worked there before so knew some people there who could help me out,” he explains. “Really, it was just close by and it fit the budget.” Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

Hawthorne Direct Reintroduces :DentalPlans

Full-service brand response agency Hawthorne Direct has launched a new campaign rebranding : DentalPlans, “the largest dental savings plan marketplace.”

The result of “an intensive creative and customer insight research process performed by : DentalPlans over the past year,” the campaign includes a television spot and branded videos, as well as a new logo, tagline, and iconography. Their approach is perhaps a little too shaped by the insight research, as the video stretches well beyond the two minute mark in an attempt to squeeze in information. That the video is a bit on the dry side to begin with makes the extended duration a bit of an ordeal to sit through, although you may be glad you came across it if you are in fact in the market for a dental plan.

“The challenge of helping a company communicate their offerings while driving response is one that our team at Hawthorne excels at,” said John Pucci, chief creative officer at Hawthorne Direct. “This endeavor was made much more rewarding by the willingness of the : DentalPlans team to work closely with us as an active, engaged partner. Our goal here was to develop a contemporary TV campaign that would bring new life to the : DentalPlans brand. The commercials were created to be simple and uplifting. The look, feel and tone of the new brand are translated across all of the commercials and videos that Hawthorne created.” Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>