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BBH NY Shows Gamers How to Do a Proper Victory Dance for PS4

BBH New York enlisted dancers from the New York City Ballet for a series of ads depicting victory celebrations for PS4, an extension of the “Greatness Awaits” campaign.

Each of the six spots begins with a group of dancers performing classic ballet moves in scenery/dress meant to evoke certain styles of games (sports, space, war, etc.) before a musical change signifies a shift in style and they perform a more modern victory dance. At the end of each 30-second spot, viewers are invited to contribute to the linked social initiative, calling on gamers to submit their own victory dance on Instagram for a chance at winning a PS4. At this point, any gaming advertising that tries something different is a welcome departure, and the social initiative has the potential to lead to some fun engagement with fans. We do wish, however, that they had managed a take of “Dunk” (stick around for it after the jump) where she actually makes the shot. Read more

Ogilvy & Mather Chicago Crafts ‘Hemingway in 15 Seconds’

Ogilvy & Mather Chicago created an Instagram campaign for The Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park adapting three classic Hemingway novels into 15-second videos.

The idea behind the campaign is that, while Hemingway’s novels are rightly considered modern classics, younger generations aren’t reading his work. So The Ernest Hemingway Foundation tasked Ogilvy & Mather Chicago with finding a way to stoke interest in the author, and the agency decided to use the popular Instagram platform. The videos are all fairly tongue-in-cheek, telling the entire plot of each novel — A Farewell To Arms, For Whom The Bell Tolls and The Old Man and the Sea – in a way designed to pique interest in the works.

Director Eduardo Cintron made every second count, as the videos had just 15 seconds to tell the entire plot of a novel. Sometimes the self-effacing humor risks going to far and parodying the work to the point where it undermines it, but for the most part they strike a balance between reverence and irreverence (after all, these are supposed to be fun), with each video ending by directing viewers to the The Ernest Hemingway Foundation’s site. Whether they can get kids to actually read For Whom The Bell Tolls is another story. Read more

MUH-TAY-ZIK | HOF-FER Launches ‘First Comes Like’ for Zoosk

MUH-TAY-ZIK | HOF-FER has launched a campaign for Zoosk entitled “First Comes Like.”

Instead of hard-selling the percentage of matches who end up married or implying that Zoosk can be used as a hookup site, the agency takes a middle ground, showing a couple’s misadventures on their first date and beyond. It’s an interesting approach that positions the brand as an alternative to both dating sites that push marriage (such as Match) and more hookup-centric sites like Tinder. Instead, Zoosk appeals to young people looking for a relationship, but not ready to think of marriage.

The way the spot portrays the excitement and awkwardness of a budding relationship is charming and feels more honest than the typical portrayals of couples in the category. There’s also a 60-second online version (featured after the jump), offering a more complete glimpse of the relationship.  Read more

Droga5 Shares ‘Treats No Tricks’ for Chobani

Instead of trying to scare you this Halloween, Droga5 decided to go a different route for Chobani.

“We made a scary video,” reads the text at the video’s opening, set to ominous music, “this is not it.” The remaining 30-seconds are, instead, devoted to dogs in funny costumes eating Chobani. It’s cute stuff, to be sure, but we’re not sure how dogs eating Chobani are supposed to make people want to eat Chobani. But then the point is probably more to raise awareness for the brand with a video Chobani and Droga5 hope people will share on social media. The video will be pushed out on the brand’s social channels throughout the weekend, supported by social media posts and a Chobani sampling (presumably for humans, not dogs) at the Chobani café in SoHo. Read more

360i, Oreo Craft Halloween ‘Nomsters’

360i and Oreo collaborated with designer Lori Nix and production company Dream Machine Creative directors for a Halloween campaign in which the brand will release a new “nomster” made out of Oreo and other confections every day.

The mad scientist creations were crafted and then filmed in a 32-by-64 inch “Oreo Laboratorium” set, designed to evoke Frankenstein, with over 100 props (many of them handmade). It’s a pretty adorable way to get the brand on people’s mind for Halloween, and its “snackable” size (the first video is 11 seconds) make it perfect for sharing on social media. The brand also offers people the chance to “Name the Nomsters” and will feature the best names in custom digital content later in the day. Oreo’s first “nomster” creation was unveiled today, a fusion of Oreo and candy corn to make a bat-like creature. So far naming suggestions include Dunkfluffula, Count Candy Corneo and Vamporeo. Read more

RPA Turns Nick Thune into ‘Brad, the Lyft Driver’ for Honda Fit

RPA is debuting a new online series promoting the Honda Fit with “Brad, the Lyft Driver,” a hidden-camera style video starring Nick Thune as Brad, an (overly) accommodating Lyft driver.

The series, directed by Fred Savage (Modern Family, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia), shows Thune (in character as Brad) “maintaining a good vibe” while yelling obnoxiously out the window, rehearsing soap opera scenes with passengers, and creating creepy personalized mix tapes. While the antics can be amusing in small doses, the video stretches well past the three minute mark, overstaying its welcome a bit in the process.

As part of its “Fit For You” campaign, RPA is also teaming up with Vine stars Jordan Burt, KC James, Cody Johns and David Lopez for a series of Vine videos with each utilizing the Honda Fit in a video showcasing their individual style. Read more

180 LA Presents ‘Lost Iguana’ for HP

180 LA has a new campaign entitled “Lost Iguana” which features the story of a precocious young boy who uses the power of HP technology to help find his lost iguana Ralph.

In a 60-second broadcast spot the boy uses HP laptops and printers to print out search flyers, and assembles a search team from around the neighborhood. By the end of the spot the self-assured boy says “And her comes the knock,” and sure enough his iguana is returned. It’s a cute approach, showing the integration of HP products, but unfortunately timed following the news that HP will split off into separate PC and printer divisions. The broadcast spot is linked to interactive campaign elements utilzizing the hashtag #FindRalph on YouTube, Vine and other channels, as well as a campaign microsite. Read more

Ogilvy, David Team Up for Spotify


Ogilvy & Mather New York teamed up with Miami sister shop David in a new campaign for Spotify entitled “#thatsongwhen.”

The campaign is built around the emotional impact of music and how songs become linked to certain life events and then trigger certain memories every time you heard them. In “Waterfalls,” for example, a man talks about TLC’s 90s hit and how he will always associate it with an unrequited crush from middle school whom he taped the song for. It’s a cute story, and one which many viewers will be able to relate to on some level, even if (like a lot of Spotify users) they have never actually used a cassette player.

Other spots in the campaign include a man walking out on a job he was just fired from to Whitesnake and a soundtrack to some good old-fashioned teen vandalism. Vine celebrities Vincent Marcus and Kenzie Nimmo get in on the action as well, through a campaign component on that platform. It’s a fun approach which makes a lot of sense for Spotify, and the campaign also includes a social extension via a hashtag people may actually feel compelled to use, (#thatsongwhen) since it offers a way for people to tell their own stories. The campaign just rolled out in the US and will expand to the UK and Germany, featuring localized content for each market.

“The realness of this campaign is the key point,” Adam Tucker, Ogilvy New York president, told Adweek. “We wanted to tap into the truth about music and it was really important to tap into real people and their feelings and the songs that inspire them.” Read more

McCann Paris Launches ‘Bra Cam’ for Nestlé Fitness

McCann Paris has a provocative new take on the breast cancer awareness PSA, launching the world’s first (according to them) “Bra Cam,” to remind women to check for breast cancer.

At the beginning of the spot, a woman fastens a hidden camera to her bra before heading out for the day in a somewhat revealing (but still plenty safe for work) outfit. The ad then brings up a counter recording each time her breasts are “checked out” over the course of the day. It’s an attention grabbing way to deliver a pretty clear message: Everyone else is checking out your breasts, so check them out yourself and self-examine regularly for breast cancer. The campaign comes complete with a social initiative asking women to post a #CheckYourSelfie, checking themselves out and inviting friends to do the same in an effort to raise breast cancer awareness and get more women to self examine regularly. Read more

David&Goliath Shows Different Side of Blake Griffin for VIZIO

David&Goliath launched a new campaign for VIZIO featuring Los Angeles Clippers star Blake Griffin cast in a different light.

Griffin spends the spots dishing out poetry on subjects like the mouthguard, tear-away pants and bobbleheads in what looks like a slam poetry cafe. Griffin’s “Slam Dunk Poetry” features an elementary rhyming scheme as he tackles his goofy subjects with apparent earnestness/seriousness, leading into the “see the beauty in everything” tagline. The campaign is timed to get basketball fans excited for the new season, which starts in October (and convince them to upgrade to a VIZIO Ultra HD). The videos launched on YouTube and VIZIO’s website Monday, and GIFS of Griffin’s performances are also available via Tumblr. Read more

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