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Posts Tagged ‘Barack Obama’

Bob Marley Passover Lights Up Hebrew Text

 

Rabbis around the world just collectively shuddered, but the conservative kids who struggle to sit through a Passover seder have something unique to look forward to. The Haggadah, the prayer book that tells the story of Passover, has just been remixed by Nathan Phillips, a senior writer at SS+K. You may be familiar with a Lena Dunham ad he wrote and directed for Barack Obama‘s reelection campaign last fall. Now, with the help of Art Director and shiksa Jessica StewartPhillips has unleashed a cool, creative affront to Jewish grandmothers: Bob Marley Passover.

Yes, Bob Marley Passover…as in, Bob Marley Passover. So brazen, it just might work. You can see the project site and download the haggadah here. Don’t forget to #BobMarleyPassover, which is further evidence that hashtagging has gotten way out of hand. But the haggadah itself is legitimate, if not light-hearted and full of a sense of humor bound to clash with almost anyone over 30.

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Mediabistro Course

Presentation Writing: Design and Delivery

Presentation Writing: Design and DeliveryLearn how to use storytelling techniques and visual content to create and deliver successful pitches and presentations! Starting August 6, Amanda Pacitti, the manager of learning at Time Inc., will teach you the best practices for presentations, from using software like Prezi and Powerpoint, to writing your script, and using images, audio, and video to drive your points. Register now! 

Thursday Odds and Ends

-The Martin Agency has invested in 80amps, a Richmond-based incubator founded by Eric Martin, a co-director of the Galant Center for Entrepreneurship at UV’s McIntire School of Commerce., that focuses on building brands, products, services and the technologies that enable them.  The Martin Agency investment amount is undisclosed.

-L.A.-based indie agency Mistress, which also works with clients including Jagermeister, has been tapped to team up  with Ubisoft on a campaign launch for the latter’s  Assassin’s Creed IV:  Black Flag. The campaign is set to launch in the fall of 2013 and the game itself will be available on Oct. 29.

-D.C.-based Bully Pulpit Interactive, a full-service agency which was created by the digital folks behind Barack Obama‘s 2008 campaign, have added Lauren Miller to its roster. Check out a statement regarding Miller’s arrival  from Senator Elizabeth Warren after the jump.

-Former JWT Dubai CD Chris Robertson has joined up with El Segundo, CA-based David&Goliath as digital creative director.

-Commercial director Paul Riccio, who’s helmed spots for clients including Verizon, McDonald’s and Citibank and is on the roster at Sandwick Media, has released a Sundance short called Space Cadet (trailer above, see full short here).

-Fresh off of taking over the Maaco biz, Santa Monica-based Pitch has opened a new unit dubbed Bicep Productions, which the parties involved tell us “means full access for rush jobs, significant cost reductions against comparable outside production studios.” The leads include director/producer Kevin Berlandi, senior editor Peter Judson and motion graphics/CG designer, Terry Politis.

- San Francisco-based MUH·TAY·ZIK | HOF·FER has hired Wexley School for Girls alum Stevan Chavez as art director.

-Online music distributor TuneCore has added Tamra Lichtman, who’s worked with brands including Clorox and Evian, as its new chief marketing officer.

 

 

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Op-Ed: What Can Digital Marketers Learn from the Election?

Huge marketing strategist lead Josh Seifert returns with his monthly contribution to this here site. The headline should give you the basic premise of our scribe’s latest entry, in which he reveals who really won out in the wake of the 2012 election. Take it away, sir.

Living in New York, I thankfully did not have to endure the billions of dollars spent on political advertising this election myself, but now that the results are in and our feeds on Facebook and Twitter are returning to their normal political apathy, it’s probably worth exploring what we as marketers learned from politics this year.

Losing a United States Senate race in a conservative state as a Republican used to be the hardest thing in the world, but as Todd Akin and Richard Mourdock learned, the potential impact of saying something stupid is even greater than it used to be. Inflammatory gaffes now extend far beyond the news cycle with social media and instant memeification reaching people who have long since tuned out traditional media coverage. While brands rarely have occasion to address topics as controversial as politicians do, their offline behaviors still have significant potential to be amplified and shared for long periods of time far beyond the incident. Just ask FedEx executives if this old package delivery YouTube video is what they want people finding and watching nearly a year later. Fortunately for brands, this can be merely damaging and not wholly destructive.

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Op-Ed: Obama Vs. Romney: Who Wins…In Terms of Websites, That Is

And so, our regular op-ed series continues, this time with a contribution from John Paolini, executive creative director at branding firm Sullivan. With Election Day coming shortly, why not take a look at the respective sites of the presidential nominees, from a designer’s POV that is. Take it away, sir. 

If you haven’t noticed, the official campaign websites for the presidential hopefuls look a lot different than they did six months ago.

Last spring, Barack Obama’s and Mitt Romney’s sites were hard to tell apart. Both employed many of the same structural and design elements: There was lots of dark blue in the banners that framed up and merchandised their very patriotic logos. The navigation was more decorative than substantive. The content, whether written or image-based, did little to engage, let alone persuade. The net result was two sites largely focused on packaging and not much on positioning.

Fast-forward to today and you have two very different online experiences. The most dramatic evolution has taken place on Mitt Romney’s site: whereas it once relied on graphic elements for emotional connection, it now has a sweeping invitation to “come fly with me.” And I can’t help feeling Romney is suggesting something more than a trip on his plane.

Romney’s language is clear: join him and succeed. His navigation also supports the idea of success. Where there was once a set of decorative buttons there is now a corporate-feeling tab structure driving you deeper. His donation module is clear and unapologetic in placement, and language such as “victory wallet” all point to a clear narrative. The gift shop is a call to “gear up!” Read: if you vote for Mitt, you are buying success! Romney’s story line is clear: get on board with Mitt and you will succeed.

The Obama site has evolved as well. While Mitt’s site is a super-charged product experience designed with a top-down perspective, the Obama site is equally rousing from the bottom up; it’s a grassroots rallying cry that focuses on “we”. The written and image-based content has taken on an intimate feeling, which manifests itself in the Instagram-style photography, suggesting a sense of historic record. The language is also simple and straightforward: “get the facts, get the latest, get involved.” As you move deeper into the site, the “we” narrative extends to all types of groups and issues: Obama herein shares his success with each of his supporters. At this level, the site design lets go of its graphic identity and allows the individual group pages to have unique graphic badges and image styles. On a subtler note, the notion of forward is amplified by the use of backwards as a device to call out Romney’s position on various issues.

Overall, what is fascinating is how the past and present websites illustrate and record the progression of this election. These websites have become more than a merchandised expression of the campaign. As digital platforms, they are the living embodiment of the candidates’ evolving positions and how the cultural narratives that surround Romney and Obama have driven them to respond instantly and iteratively to the changing conversation.

 

 

Op-Ed: ‘Klout Bomb’ Defined

Do you care about your Klout score? Well, if you’re all hung on “your ability to drive action”, here’s a little ditty from Megan Wintersteen, strategic planner at Blacksburg, VA-based digital shop Modea, who discusses the art of “Klout bombing.”

The credibility of a Klout score has been a controversial topic for some time now. Regardless of whether or not you believe in it, one thing is for sure – Klout has spawned one of the most spectacular Internet pranks to date: Klout Bombing.

Klout is a tool that measures the influence of a social media user across a variety of topics. Beyond Klout-assigned topics of influence, users may also award +K’s to each other as a demonstration of expertise.  A Klout Bomb occurs when the awarded topic is something sarcastic, ironic or derogatory towards that person. In other words, something he or she typically would not want to be affiliated with.

I would know because I’ve been Klout Bombed.

One of my wise-guy coworkers decided it would be funny to +K me in “Prison” on Klout (for the record, I’ve never been anywhere near a prison). After expressing my dissatisfaction, other coworkers and friends found entertainment in increasing my influence in “Prison,” and it ultimately became a running joke around the office.

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Eminem: The Most Popular Living Person on Facebook

Social media statistics service Famecount.com announced today that rapper Eminem now has 28.86 million fans on Facebook, making him the most popular living person on the world’s most popular social media website. This comes three days after Eminem became just the third person to pass 1 billion play counts on YouTube after Lady Gaga and Justin Bieber.

Eminem dethroned Lady Gaga for the top spot on the chart. Holding the #1 position on the chart for the past eight months after stripping the title from Barack Obama, she now sits in second place with 28.85 million. The current most liked person living or dead on Facebook? The late Michael Jackson with 29 million fans. What about the fastest growing star according to Famecount? Rihanna, who sits at third place among the living with 25.3 million Facebook likes.

A chart on Famecount’s website shows that Eminem’s rapid rise to the top started in June, correlating with the release of his wildly popular seventh full-length album, Recovery. While Slim Shady holds the Facebook crown, he’s still in third place in overall internet fame due to Lady Gaga and Justin Bieber ruling YouTube and Twitter. Meanwhile, Groovecount.com, which also measures web fame across digital services, has Em second only to Lady Gaga.