TVNewser Show TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote SocialTimes AllFacebook FishbowlNY FishbowlDC PRNewser 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Ceinwyn Clark’

W+K Launches the Only Interactive Site Where Hair Plays Huey Lewis Songs

W+K Portland has unveiled “The Power of Hair” for Old Spice, the “newest, never-been-done-before interactive digital experience.”

The new site is an extension of W+K’s “For Hair That Gets Results” campaign promoting Old Spice’s new haircare and styling products, featuring the same anthropomorphic hair, and comes on the heels of the “Boardwalk” and “Meeting” spots Old Spice debuted late last month. Visitors to “The Power of Hair are greeted by a testimonial video with a young man extolling the virtues of Old Spice’s hair products. Predictably, this includes attention from the ladies and respect around the office. Less predictably, this includes Huey Lewis songs. “When you’ve got great hair like this, you’d be surprised by how many Huey Lewis songs it can play on the piano,” the now bald man says.

Visitors to the site are then asked to pick a Huey Lewis song, and the hair (which by now has slithered off of the guy’s head) will play them on piano, occasionally adding in some percussion. You can pick from among 29 of Lewis’ greatest hits, including “The Power of Love,” “I Want a New Drug,” “The Heart of Rock n’ Roll,” “Bad is Bad” and “Doing It All for My Baby.” It’s a pretty absurd idea (and yeah, we’re pretty sure no one has done this before), but then this is the kind of silliness we’ve come to expect from W+K’s work for Old Spice and a fitting extension of the “For Hair That Gets Results” campaign, complete with a perfect title. Give “The Power of Hair” a try above or at the site, and stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Public Relations: Build Your Portfolio

Public Relations: Build Your PortfolioIn this intensive workshop, you'll get feedback from your instructor on how you can refine and tighten your prose, structure your work, and build a body of work. Whether you are looking to create materials for a PR portfolio or wanting to polish your work, you'll leave this class with a professional portfolio and the skills to build it throughout your career. Register now! 

W+K, Dodge Reveal a Couple More Dart ‘How-to’s’

Four months since the debut “How to Change Cars Forever,” WK’s Portland’s first spot for the Dodge Dart, it’s clear the campaign is now kicking it into high-gear with phase two.

When we first posted the debut spot back in July, there was quite a discussion going on in our comments section. It’s become par for the course here: We post new work from W+K, and the comments explode with people saying it’s not as good as Wieden’s past work or, if someone likes it, it’s because her or she must some sort of W+K fanboy. It’s a testament to W+K’s amazing portfolio they’ve built throughout the years. We expect this agency to blow our mind with every campaign, and we’re quick to complain when it doesn’t.

While this Dodge Dart maybe didn’t completely turn my world upside down with the first spot, it’s definitely grown on me. Despite the fact that it seems to run during every commercial break of an NFL telecast, when I hear the familiar bassline of Kanye West/Jay-Z‘s “No Church in the Wild,” I find myself always completely absorbed in the spot, guessing what aspect of the Dodge Dart will be presented next.

These two new spots, “Interior” and “Unsafe,” take the same formula and condense it into 30-second slices of sensory overload. Perhaps its reflective of the over-caffeniated environment of the W+K Portland office? In any case, the rapid-fire narrative of the Dart’s features really does make the car look like it is far more technologically advanced than any of its competitors. If you’re wondering how to make TV spots dazzle and sell simultaneously, well, it’s just this easy. Credits after the jump.

Read more

Meet John Varvatos: Fashionista, Crate-Digger and Chrysler Driver

Hey, if hip-hop stars and NFL athletes can dig the Chrysler 300, why can’t fashion designers? Well, at least John Varvatos seems to. Just like the car itself, the current New York resident is also “imported from Detroit” and his rock-influenced style is reflected in this latest spot from W+K Portland (hey, the man is buying an Iggy & the Stooges record and his boutique took over CBGBs if you’re looking for credentials).

Guess that now that the love letter to the blue-collar world of Detroit has been sent with the Slim Shady Super Bowl (and BrandBowl-winning) ad, W+K is just content to let celebs take the wheel and set this campaign in cruise control. But, at least we give props to the agency for enlisting one of our fave directors, Mark Romanek, to helm this spot. Credits after the jump.

Read more

D&G Channels Spirit of Bay, Bruckheimer in Kia Super Bowl Spot

David&Goliath nixes the Yo Gabba Gabba gang and Heavy soundtrack in favor of a CGI-addled extravaganza starring everyone from Poseidon and aliens to tribal warriors with its 2011 Super Bowl entry for Kia and its Optima line.

Really though, is there any chance in hell the agency/brand can triumph over last year’s spot? We think not, though at least a cameo from the animated crew could suffice.  Oh well. You can be the judge and the wait for the USA Ad Meter on Monday to see how it fared.

Read more

LeBron Poses Rhetorical Question, Addresses Backlash in New Nike Ad

With the Miami Heat set to tip off the NBA season tonight against the Boston Celtics, it’s rather timely that W+K Portland unveils this Nike spot called “Rise” starring Heat forward and two-time reigning MVP LeBron James. Following his less-than-well-received ESPN special, “The Decision,” where James announced he was taking his talents to South Beach, the backlash that ensued was virtually unparalleled.

So, in this spot, James simply asks the viewer, “What should I do?” While not even close to being as creepy as Tiger Woods’ pre-Masters Nike spot, this LeBron clip (directed by Stacy Wall) seems to beg for the audience’s sympathy just as much. Still, it’s not half-bad and way more entertaining than Tiger’s entry, what with its nod to “The Decision,” a shout-out to noted LeBron critic Charles Barkley and even a cameo appearance by Don Johnson. Will it rehabilitate LeBron’s image at all in the eyes of those who loathe him, though? We doubt it. Credits after the jump.

Read more