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Posts Tagged ‘Ice Cube’

ESPN Sends Off U.S. Team with Revamped ‘I Believe’

With only two days until the 2014 World Cup kicks off in Brazil, ESPN has released a revamped version of their “I Believe” spot (which we covered back in April) as a send off to the U.S. team.

The new spot, created in-house, augments the crowd chants of “I believe that we will win” from the original with celebrities — such as Kevin Costner, Ice Cube, Whoopi Goldberg, Jon Hamm, Jimmy Kimmel, and Andrew McCutchen — slowly working their way through the line. Unfortunately, the approach doesn’t really add any life to the blase anthem. If you’re a big fan of the team, you’re already excited for the World Cup to start. If not, ESPN’s latest spot won’t really do anything to entice you.

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The ‘Good Day Blimp’ Project Comes to Fruition

Last month, we brought you news of four creatives — Jon Barco, Andy Dao, Bryan Denman, and Michael Lopez — who launched a campaign to make the “Ice Cube’s A Pimp” Goodyear blimp of Ice Cube‘s classic “It Was A Good Day” a reality on National Good Day Day, January 20th, while raising money for the South Central charity A Place Called Home. The campaign went viral, and Goodyear took notice. While they were reluctant to fly that particular message, Goodyear did indeed commemorate January 20th with a “Good Day Blimp,” and even offered the kids of A Place Called Home a ride-along on the blimp.

Tool’s Jason Zada, who you may remember from the award-winning and creepy “Take This Lollipop,” was there to document the process. Ice Cube was on hand, thrilled to help out A Place Called Home, and the Good Day Blimp crowdfunding crew couldn’t have been happier (well, except maybe if Goodyear had run with the original message). If you’ve been following this story at all, it’s well worth the four minutes to see this charitable campaign come to fruition, and to hear Ice Cube‘s thoughts on the matter. Here’s hoping you all have a good day.

Monday Morning Stir

-Want to block ads on the new Xbox dashboard? Here’s how. link

-Speaking of video games, Call of Duty: MW3 has surpassed Avatar sales. link

-AOL promoted Jim Norton to head of ad sales. link

-Anthony Kiedis joins Ice Cube and Jason Schwartzman in celebrating LA’s Pacific Standard Time (above).

-The Rick Perry “Strong” ad fallout continues. link

Method Man, Sour Patch Kids Roll Deep

You know what’s a real thug-ass candy? Sour Patch Kids, that’s what. Know how I know? Because Method Man, the 40-year-old rapper and actor of Wu-Tang Clan and How High fame, made a music video co-starring Sour Patch Kids running around his crib and messing around in his recording studio. If you don’t think teens and young adults can connect with this sort of product/celebrity placement on an emotional level, well, you just don’t get it.

From Mother NY comes the greatest Method Man-related collaboration since he teamed up with Mary J. Blige for the 1995 hit, “I’ll Be There for You/You’re All I Need to Get By.” This new track from Meth, “World Gone Sour (The Lost Kids),” will also be featured in a new Sour Patch Kids video game. However there’s no word as of now as to whether or not it will be featured on Method Man’s new album, The Crystal Meth, expected to be released this year after a string of delays.

To be perfectly honest, I’m amazed that Mother NY got a rap legend like Method Man to be the new spokesperson for this Kraft Foods candy brand, and I applaud Method Man for doing something more child-friendly as his focus is shifting from being a hardened representative of East Coast rap to being a family man. But, as has happened with names like Ice Cube, the target audience for this campaign doesn’t remember 36 Chambers or the impact that album had on the pop music landscape.

So, it’s kind of bittersweet that today’s youth might only think of Method Man as “that Sour Patch Kids guy,” as they probably already think of Ice Cube as “that TBS sitcom guy” or Dr. Dre as “that Dr. Pepper guy.” Admittedly, I saw Ray Charles play live before he passed away, and though I had heard of his impact on music (which was obviously much more significant than any of the aforementioned rappers) and in some way understood it, it was hard not to think of him as “that guy from the Pepsi commercials.” But, at the end of the day, maybe that’s alright. At least a new generation of consumers will know the stars of yesteryear in some way. Credits after the jump.

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