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Posts Tagged ‘John Buroker’

Publicis Seattle Highlights Les Schwab’s Customer Service


Publicis Seattle has released two new ads for family-owned tire chain Les Schwab highlighting the company’s dedication to customer service.

Publicis Seattle created the two television spots based on real-life customer stories. Each ad features the customer reading their letter to Les Schwab, praising the exceptional customer service they received. In “Stranded Nanny,” for example, a woman tells the story of how her car broke down on her way home from work. She knocked on a door asking for help, and the man who answered happened to own a local Les Schwab. He fixed her car, without pay, and she was quickly on her way.

The other spot, “RV Weekend,” takes a similar approach. The spots will air across western US markets including Washington, Oregon, Idaho, California, Utah, Nevada, Colorado and Montana. Read more

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Dickies Shows Off Blue Collar Pants

The construction man in the new Dickies spot produced by Seattle-based agency Creature is actually wearing a blue-collared shirt, a level of detail that could’ve been overlooked, especially in an ad for pants. We never see the man’s face, but we can assume he likes to wear Dickies khakis to the construction site and Real. Comfortable. Jeans. at home. He eats bacon and eggs for breakfast, probably has two kids and a young wife, and works hard every day. He’s undoubtedly American, might even wear stars and stripes boxers. If a time machine zapped him back to the 1950s, he wouldn’t skip a beat.

All of my assumptions are based on this 30-second spot, which uses quick cuts and sharp noises as fodder for a charmingly patriotic tone. The only word of dialogue, “Daddy,” is spoken when the construction man’s son jumps on his leg when he gets home from work. The ad is the much-subtler cousin to the Dodge Ram farmer commercial from the Super Bowl, selling the blue-collar image to the everyman, not just the everymen who live in red states. Credits after the jump.

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