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Archives: November 2012

8 Best Practices For Using Twitter For Business [INFOGRAPHIC]

Twitter comes with a pretty steep learning curve, and brands looking to maximise their ROI (return on investment) on the micro-blogging social network need to ensure that they’re on the right path.

But where to begin? Well, sharing photos and behind the scenes information about your business is a great start. Make sure you’re listening to your customers and all of the Twitter mentions about your company. Ask questions of your followers. And, perhaps most importantly, establish a clear and consistent brand voice – how to you want YOUR business to appear on Twitter?

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How To Use Twitter To Save Money This Holiday Shopping Season

One of the under-utilized benefits of Twitter is its facilitation of saving money.

Twitter can make coupon clipping, deal sleuthing and budgeting a lot quicker and simpler.

With the holiday shopping season underway, now’s as good a time as any to share a few tips for using Twitter to save money.

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Three Common Twitter Goofs, And How To Recover From Them

Everyone does it.

You misspell a word and press “Send” too quickly; you’re a social media manager for a brand and you tweet something personal to the company’s thousands of followers; you send a tweet that was meant to be a DM.

It happens, and it’s not the end of the world. But it’s always smart to keep apprised of the potential Twitter traps to avoid, and prepare a game plan for when you do mess up.

Here are three common Twitter goofs. Before you panic, we’ll also help you out with a few damage control tactics.

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The 5 Stages Of ‘Getting’ Twitter

In her seminal 1969 book On Dying, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross first introduced what would become commonly known as The Five Stages Of Grief (and professionally, as the Kübler-Ross Model). Based on interviews with more than 500 patients, Kübler-Ross’s research describes the five sequential stages by which people cope with grief and tragedy – denial, anger, bargaining, depression and, finally, acceptance.

Kübler-Ross’s study originally applied only to those suffering from terminal illness, but this was later expanded to include any form of ‘bereavement’ – for example, the loss of a job, income or freedom – as well as major life-changing events, such as drug addiction, relocation and divorce.

I believe that we can also apply this process to Twitter – specifically, the concept of ‘getting’ it.

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Meetings, Office Politics And Social Media – How Do We Waste Time At Work? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Did you know that more than six in ten employees visit non work-related websites during office hours, and almost half (46 percent) have spent time at their desk looking for other jobs?

Social media can be a source of time suckage, too. Facebook is the biggest culprit, with 41 percent of respondents using the social network, ahead of LinkedIn (37 percent), Twitter (8 percent) and Pinterest (4 percent).

But overall, the internet is less of a threat to employee productivity than you might think – less than one in five (18 percent) workers waste time online.

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View Top Tweets In Google Analytics With Campalyst Plugin

Want to know which tweets (and which Twitterers) generate the most traffic for your site?

Now you can – thanks to this handy Google Analytics tweet plugin from Campalyst.

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Twitter Minions Cringe As CEO Vows Downloadable Tweets By End Of Year

Twitter’s CEO, Dick Costolo gave an hour-long presentation the University of Michigan recently and during this speech he insisted, yet again, that users will be able to download ALL of their tweets by the end of the year. But is that possible?

Twitter engineers seem to think not. Pretty much everybody writing about this topic seems to think not. So why the impossible challenge? That doesn’t seem very Holiday Spirit-ish.

Is Costolo a grinch?

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Say Hello To Baby #HashtagJameson: A Little Girl With (Obviously) Twitter-Addicted Parents

We told you the history of the hashtag earlier today – and now we have a momentous event to add to its chronology: the first baby named Hashtag.

A little girl named Hashtag Jameson, to be precise. Her nickname will be #. Kind of like Prince (when he went haywire and did that weird symbol thing), but pronounceable.

This must be a joke. Please let it be a joke?

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The Ultimate Social Media Sizing Cheat Sheet [INFOGRAPHIC]

Whether you’re new to the game or a socially savvy marketing veteran, setting up a new Twitter profile or Facebook Page can be a time-consuming process, especially when it comes to working out the sizes of all the images you need to make your channels – or those of your clients – stand out from the crowd.

And what about the other social platforms, like Pinterest and Google+? Wouldn’t it be great if somebody could put all of this information on a single page?

Earlier this year we looked at a very thorough social media sizing cheat sheet from those nice folks at LunaMetrics which, as we commented at the time, was incredibly useful, but could have used a little spit and polish on the old design front.

Good news – not only have the team at LunaMetrics revamped the look of their graphic, they’ve also updated the content so that it now includes all the latest social media sizing information for Facebook, Twitter, Google+, YouTube, LinkedIn and Pinterest.

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A Short History Of The Hashtag

Perhaps the most important term in the Essential Twitter Dictionary we published last week is “hashtag.”

A hashtag, or “#”, denotes a keyword or topic on Twitter. It’s any string of characters without spaces.

Some of the most popular hashtags from the past few months are: #NFL, #Election2012, #BlackFriday and #CyberMonday.

Hashtags are the quickest and easiest way to search for and find out what Twitter users are currently talking about. They’re also key to productive Twitter engagement – hashtags put your tweets in front of the people who are interested in them.

But how did it all start?

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