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Posts Tagged ‘Libel’

Will Twitter’s Dublin Headquarters Open It Up To Libel Lawsuits?

If you check out Twitter’s recent job openings, you’ll see quite a few international openings posted. Everything seems hunky dory, right?

Well, Twitter’s European headquarters in Dublin may come with a cost they didn’t expect.

We wonder if they can hear the water rushing toward them?

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School Teaches Students Libel Risks They Face On Twitter

It ain’t easy being a kid online these days. There are cyberbullies everywhere it seems, with peers (and even some adults) who are quick to delight in others’ unfortunate and uber-public missteps.

And now teens have to worry about saying something stupid (as all teens inevitably do) and being sued for libel.

Fortunately for these kids, one school is taking steps to teach students about this super-serious threat before its kids stumble. Other schools should consider similar offerings, unless they’re fans of children learning the hard way (hand on a hot stove-top style).

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UK Politician Lord McAlpine To Sue 10,000 Twitter Users In Historic Lawsuit

It’s already been well established that you can be sued for what you tweet. But a UK politician is taking this logic to the extreme and suing over 10,000 Twitter users for tweeting and retweeting libelous claims that he was involved in a sex abuse scandal. If the lawsuit hits the courts, it will be the largest in UK history in terms of the number of defendants.
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Parody Account Poses As Shell Oil And Fools Twitterverse

Did the definition for libel change or is it still “anything that is defamatory or that maliciously or damagingly misrepresents?”

It’s baffling that Greenpeace is able to continue pushing out tweets under the @ShellisPrepared Twitter handle, blatantly misrepresenting itself as Shell.

We know everyone hates big oil, but come on.

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Twitter Must Reveal Bullies’ Identities Or Be Held Legally Responsible, New Law Says

Unless Twitter coughs up the identities of those using 140 characters to abuse, slander and otherwise troll victims, a newly proposed UK law would see the company hauled into court to pay hefty fines.
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Million Dollar Twitter Libel Lawsuit Heads To Court

A Portland blogger is facing a million dollar lawsuit later this month, for sending allegedly defamatory tweets about a medical spa doctor.
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Twitter Defamation Cases Are Heating Up

Watch what you say on Twitter. Just because something is 140 characters long, doesn’t mean it doesn’t have the power to land you in the courtroom.

Another Twitter defamation case has been filed. Perhaps not surprisingly, this one – like several before it – is in the entertainment industry: record executive Ira DeWitt is suing artist Johnny Gill for comments that he made about her on Twitter.
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Can Tweets Be Libelous? A Warning To US Journalists

Just because something is tweeted doesn’t mean it is treated any differently than something spoken, written in an article, or blogged. Poynter’s Mallary Jean Tenore gives a great overview of the potentially libelous nature of tweets, and how journalists can protect themselves.
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World’s Second Twitter Libel Case Ends in Tens of Thousands of Pounds in Damages Paid

If Courtney Love’s case wasn’t lesson enough, here’s another one to make you pause before you hit “tweet”: the world’s second Twitter libel case has been settled in favor of the individual alleging defamation in 140-characters or less. A British politician will pay damages of £3,000 and the legal fees of the plaintiff.
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