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Posts Tagged ‘social media rules’

The 80 Rules Of Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC]

So you want to get good at social media?

You need to have a plan. A guidebook. A strategy.

You need some rules.

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How to Respond to Negative Tweets

Social media can be a boon and a bane to companies and consumers alike. It’s undoubtedly true that brands and consumers can have a constructive dialogue on Twitter and Facebook. Case in point: A WSJ subscriber misses an issue and tweets his displeasure to head honcho Rupert Murdoch himself. Not only did he get a reply, but some quality customer service as well!

Unfortunately, trolls abound in the online world and can drown out those offering constructive criticism. How can you tell the haters from those that are worth responding to? And how can you manage your time when it comes to responding to criticism? In the latest Mediabistro feature, social media experts weigh in on how to handle negative feedback in a way that’s best for you and your audience.

One big piece of advice: don’t just delete.

“How you handle a negative comment says much more about you than the comment itself,” said Shama Kabani, CEO of The Marketing Zen Group. “Removing a comment can lead to others accusing you of censorship and, at worst, can lead to a PR disaster.”

For more, read 7 Tips for Responding to Negative Social Media Feedback. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

21 Rules For Effective Social Media Marketing [INFOGRAPHIC]

Social media comes with a pretty steep learning curve, which places an enormous amount of value in tried-and-tested guidelines, which can only come from persistence and experience.

Like many of the good things in life, there are no shortcuts, and while some folks get uncomfortable with the use of the word rules on platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest, there are some things that you really have to do to get ahead. For example, it’s important that you position yourself to be an expert so that your audience learn to trust your advice. Whatever you do, you must avoid spamming. At all times, your audience will expect you to keep it real. Your content should strive to engage and enrich. If you want to convert visitors into customers, always follow up with connections.

And, perhaps most importantly, have fun. It’ll make this inevitably long journey a lot more pleasurable.

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The 36 Rules Of Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC]

Everyone’s an influencer. The consumer is out for himself (not for you). Optimize content. It’s an organism, not a process. Think past vanity metrics (like followers). Update your Facebook Page… or delete it.

Good advice, right? As much as it frustrates marketers, the business of social media is as much an art as it is a science, but there are some tried and tested rules and guidelines that just work. And brands, new and old, need to pay attention.

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Your Company Doesn’t Need A Social Media Rulebook (Just Some Common Sense)

The New York Times has impressed me not once, but twice this week.

First, they’ve decided to experiment with turning off their automated (and very robotic) @nytimes Twitter feed in favour of having the updates managed by (gasp) real people. Which means (as you can see here) actual engagement.

(Although, being frank, it’s pretty fleeting at the moment. But still, they’re trying.)

Second, Liz Heron, The New York Times social media editor (and one of the scribes behind the new-and-human @nytimes account) spoke at the BBC’s Social Media Summit earlier this week and revealed that the Times has a satisfyingly laid-back approach to the management of their social media program, too.

“We don’t really have any social media guidelines. We basically just tell people to use common sense and don’t be stupid.”

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