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Archives: December 2007

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Jonathan Martin Is Cold

Hooker Ads: The Week In Review

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(An explanation of “Hooker Ads”)

It was a fairly average week for Hooker Ads, starting with 10 ads and ending with 11.

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Wednesday passed the 400 total ads mark, becoming the third day to do so.

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Wednesday also increased its average to seven ads per week.

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The trend this week is down from recent weeks — perhaps there are fewer patrons when the government closes down for the holidays.

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In Memoriam: Deborah C. Tang

From Journal-isms:

    Deborah C. Tang, who created Black Entertainment Television’s news division and as vice president of news, entertainment and sports programming hired news anchor Ed Gordon, talk-show host Tavis Smiley and others who went on to become journalists around the country, died on Christmas Day of cancer at her Washington home, her sister, Marie Canada, told Journal-isms. She was 60

Tony Snow On Blogs: “On a day-to-day basis, story-to-story, they don’t have much of an impact.”

Uh-oh…don’t let Glenn Reynolds hear this

    reason: How has the advent of new media such as bloggers complicated your job as press secretary?

    Snow: Not much. I’ve been a little bit surprised because I’ve always been an advocate of blogs but, at this juncture, they don’t affect things too much. The interesting thing about blogs is that they tend to be serial. They get into an issue and really dig into it, hit it hard. Then they play a very important role, but, on a day-to-day basis, story-to-story, they don’t have much of an impact.

Read Reason’s full interview with Snow here.

Thompson Takes On The Press With Snowballs

One way to thaw that cold press coverage…

Slate Questions Post’s Front Page Choice

From Sunday’s “Today’s Papers“:

    The Washington Post leads with former President Bill Clinton stumping for Sen. Hillary Clinton in Iowa. …

    The WP’s choice of lead is puzzling. Not just because they’re treating a man endorsing his wife as front page news, but because of how neatly it parrots the Clinton campaign’s rhetoric. A dissenting voice doesn’t appear until the story’s 10th paragraph, and after that the focus goes right back to expounding on the Clinton campaign message.

The Year In Errors

A few local winners of Regret The Errors’ annual roundup of notable corrections:

  • Washington Post:

      A Feb. 12 Metro article incorrectly reported that the parents of a teenager killed Saturday while fleeing D.C. police are deceased. Both parents of Kevin Thomas, 17, are alive.

  • Washington Post:

      Army Spec. Hugo Gonzalez was misidentified in two photo captions with the Oct. 1 installment of the Left of Boom series, and his rank was incorrect on Page One. Also, in some editions of the Oct. 2 installment of the series, the full name of an EFP, a type of weapon used by insurgents, was incorrectly given as “explosively formed perpetrator.” It should have been “explosively formed penetrator.”

  • New York Times:

      A headline on a report in The Caucus roundup yesterday, about The New York Post’s error in reporting that Senator John Kerry had chosen Richard A. Gephardt as his running mate in 2004, misstated the famous headline in The Chicago Daily Tribune in 1948 when the paper declared the wrong winner in the presidential race. The headline was “Dewey Defeats Truman,” not “Dewey Beats Truman.”

  • New York Times:

      An article on Saturday about fund-raising efforts in New York by Senator Barack Obama misspelled the surname of one of President John F. Kennedy’s closest advisers, who introduced Mr. Obama at a fund-raiser. He is Theodore C. Sorensen, not Sorenson. (Go to Article) The error also appeared in an article in The Arts on Feb. 22 about books written by candidates, including “Profiles in Courage,” which then-Senator Kennedy wrote with guidance from Mr. Sorensen. (The Times has misspelled Mr. Sorensen’s surname more than 135 times in headlines and articles during the 50-plus years he has been a Democratic adviser and well-known author.)

  • Los Angeles Times:

      Pelosi’s celebration: An article in Section A on Thursday about new Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) referred to “the late” Rep. Lindy Boggs. Boggs is alive.

    The Washington City Paper gives its pick.

  • Kristol To Pen NYT Column

    The Huffington Post broke the news of the New York Times’ hiring of Bill Kristol as a columnist, calling it “a move bound to create controversy.” (See the Times’ confirmation here.)

    Editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal tells the Politico’s Michael Calderone:

      “The idea that The New York Times is giving voice to a guy who is a serious, respected conservative intellectual — and somehow that’s a bad thing,” Rosenthal added. “How intolerant is that?”

    So……what do you think?

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    Pictures Of Morning Papers

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