TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Al Neuharth’

Morning Reading List, 01.05.09

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Content Marketing 101

Content Marketing 101Starting September 8, get hands-on content marketing training in Content Marketing 101! Through a series of webcasts, content and marketing experts will teach you the best practices for creating, distributing and measuring the results of your brand's content, including how to develop a content marketing plan, become a content marketing and more. Register now! 

Morning Reading List, 04.07.08

morningrdplist.JPG

Good morning Washington. Playbook tells us that Bloomberg’s Billy McQuillen, “who provides ‘adult’ supervision to Catholic University’s newspaper, is a birthday boy today.’”

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | EVENTS | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think Monica Lewinsky will vote for Obama in ’08.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “Went to yet another ‘retirement’ party for a couple of newspaper writer friends of mine taking the buy out and getting the hell out of Dodge. All while the losers ‘running’ the paper (In to the ground..) are staying.”

  • This week’s mediabistro.com classes include How to Write About Anything, Interviewing Techniques and Fact-Checking.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • DCRTV reports,Richard Willing has joined the Office Of The Director of National Intelligence as its director of public affairs. Willing covered civil and criminal justice issues, as well as intelligence and national security, for USA Today from 1997 until this January.”

  • A release announced, “The Center for Public Integrity is pleased to announce that David E. Kaplan has been named the new Director of its International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ).”

  • News-Press.com reports,Kate Marymont, vice president and executive editor/Information Center at The News-Press and news-press.com, was named today as vice president/Information Center Content for McLean, Va.-based Gannett Inc., the paper’s owner.”

  • Business Wire reports,Jennifer Carroll, vice president of New Media Content and an architect of the company’s Information Center initiative, will become vice president of Digital Content for Gannett Digital.”

  • The Washington Post announced, “The Maryland desk is delighted to announce that we’ve hired Aaron Davis, an enterprise reporter for the Associated Press in Sacramento, Calif., to cover law enforcement in Prince George’s County. He succeeds Candace Rondeaux, who went to Foreign to cover Pakistan and Afghanistan.”

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of Society for Science & the Public, has named Tosh Arimura circulation manager.”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “Throughout the campaign, the media have treated Paul as a footnote. Snickering pundits all but dismissed him as a cranky kook, in the tradition of another Lone Star State insurgent, Ross Perot. Even when the mainstream publications covered him, you could imagine the assignment editors rolling their eyes in amusement, like parents patronizing a child. Yet anyone who looked hard enough knew that there was more to Paul than an inability to amass delegates. Most of the media, turned off by his shrill libertarian leanings, missed the real news value of Paul’s story — namely, the Texas congressman’s ability to connect intensely with voters.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows,Hillary Clinton’s retraction of her claim that she came under sniper fire while visiting Bosnia in 1996 was one of the main campaign storylines last week. But the controversy over her statements did not resonate as widely as the furor over statements made by Barack Obama’s pastor earlier in March. Four-in-ten Americans heard a lot about Clinton’s claim that she came under sniper fire, compared with 51% who had heard a lot about Rev. Wright’s sermons the week before.”
  • “Results from the Dow Jones Insight — 2008 Presidential Election Media Pulse show that Barack Obama’s pivotal race speech on March 18 may have helped mitigate that week’s controversy surrounding the remarks of Reverend Jeremiah Wright, shifting attention back to the issues of the economy and the upcoming Pennsylvania primary.”

  • CJR reports, “Business news is booming these days. Business-news sections not so much. They are disappearing and have been doing so regularly for months. The trend seems set to continue.”

  • Washington Blade editor’s Kevin Naff asks, “Why did editor Len Downie go to such lengths to hide the simple fact that a soldier was gay?”

  • Huffington Post has a “Eulogy for Dead Trees”

  • “As Katharine Weymouth, granddaughter of the legendary Katharine Graham, takes over as publisher of the Washington Post,” The Washingtonian has some “suggestions for her agenda, based on interviews with subscribers and Post staffers.”

  • Romenesko reports, “WSJ changes news desk structure”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Veteran newsman Roger Mudd” reports the “five best” “essential works about journalism.”

  • Joel Achenbach writes, “Let’s have a blog item today that’s not about me and my personal obsessions and neuroses. Instead, let’s talk about the general plight of all those middle-aged newspaper reporters out there who, at the age of 47, are just barely too young to get the buyout offer. Clearly it is time for these people to think about the next big career move.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “I’ve said many times that Barack Obama has gotten easy treatment from the news media, although that has changed a bit in recent weeks, particularly since the Rev. Jeremiah Wright became a household name, at least in households that watch plenty of cable. In fact, there’s a bit of a narrative about Obama as an elitist starting to take hold in the media, and that could prove troublesome for him.”

  • New York Time’s Public Editor writes, “Change Can Be Painful, but This One Shouldn’t Hurt”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Most regular local readers of The Post read it on newsprint. And when they want something in the paper and it’s not there, they usually don’t like me telling them to find it on washingtonpost.com.”

  • Washington City Paper’s Mike DeBonis asks, “Has Adrian Fenty reneged on his campaign tax pledge?”

  • Check out The Best of Cox 2008 winners.

    Top of post

    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, March 30, 2008 in all categories.”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for First quarter 2008, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and the key Adults 25-54 demographic.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Major television networks are privately saying that if they have to worry about a fine every time someone utters a profanity on air, they may have to stop real-time broadcasting of live events such as the Academy Awards and Grammys. At the same time, the head of the Federal Communications Commission and parents groups are saying that if the Supreme Court removes the threat, ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox will seize the opportunity to make the airwaves more coarse and profane.”

  • 23/6 has the “Inappropriate Hottie Rundown: Racially Diverse Pundit Edition”

  • Forbes.com reports, “Forty years after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Tom Brokaw is making sure his legacy isn’t forgotten. In King, a two-hour television documentary premiering on the History Channel April 6, the award-winning newsman talks to everyone from Bill Clinton to Forest Whitaker to Dr. King’s son Martin Luther King III about the legendary civil rights figure.”

  • TVNewser reported on Friday, “Megan Henderson, morning anchor at Fox O&O KDFW, will be co-hosting Fox & Friends this weekend.”

  • The AP reports, “Early Mike Wallace interviews now online”

  • “TVNewser received several tips wondering what happened during the 6:30 feed of Friday’s NBC Nightly News. Brian Williams was anchoring from Memphis to mark the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Williams began the broadcast with a live interview with Sen. John McCain. What they didn’t expect was a crowd behind them with speeches blaring through loudspeakers.”

  • A tipster tells us from Friday, “Bill Press speaking to an irate caller on today’s ‘Washington Journal’: ‘Chris Matthews is in the tank for Barack Obama, but don’t blame it on me.’

  • “CNN Crosses Paths With Clinton, Grabs Impromptu Interview,” TVNewser reports.

  • From a TVNewser tipster: ‘I understand that there is a move afoot to develop a legal television network in place of CourtTV.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Last night’s Daily Show with Jon Stewart featured a glance at Sen. Barack Obama’s recent media tour. Some got snubbed, some got cozy and some were ‘thrilled’ to spend an hour with the candidate…until hearts were broken.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • An ABC release announced, “ABCNEWS.com continues to achieve record-breaking traffic in March 2008. In March, ABCNEWS.com scored another high traffic month, reaching nearly 23 million uniques, an increase of 69% compared with the same time last year, according to ABC’s measurements. The site also garnered 207.4 million page views, up 44% from the previous year and marked four consecutive months of record page view growth. In March, the site increased video views by 123% compared to the same time last year, according to ABC.”

  • This Wednesday is the Blogger’s Happy Hour Bash at Velocity Five Restaurant. For more info, click here.

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “Is the Huffington Post really a $200 million company? Monday’s New York Times story about the fast-growing group blog/news aggregator left a lot of people wondering about that eye-catching number, reportedly the price the company uses in its internal discussions about the possibility of a sale. The consensus, among those who know about some matters: No, the Huffington Post is not remotely worth $200 million.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Google Inc. confirmed Thursday it bid in the recent government spectrum auction in an effort to wring higher competing bids out of Verizon Wireless and open up a large chunk of the airwaves to outside Internet devices.”

  • Reuters reports, “News Corp’s Fox Interactive Media Internet division could fall short of its fiscal 2008 revenue target of $1 billion, as it reorganizes its divisions to better exploit the online advertising market.”

  • ABC.com asks, “Should Drudge and Huffington Get Pulitzers?”

  • The Swamp reports, “It’s an introspective week for The Swamp. First we rolled out a new look and invited critiques. Now, some university researchers are asking whether we — and newspaper political blogs across the Web — should exist at all.”

  • Guardian’s greenslade reports, “I have argued for some time that the internet will free us from media mogul domination. Oddly, Rupert Murdoch has said much the same thing, a clue that I was being more than a shade optimistic. Now comes evidence that the democratising force of the net is anything but a given.”

  • Gannett Blog reports, “The non-profit Freedom Forum’s most recent tax return shows that it paid Founder Al Neuharth $225,000 in 2006, plus gave him a $200,545 expense account — the biggest such account of any officer, director or trustee. Neuharth, 84, who recently groused about his diminished mental capacity, worked 40 hours a week for Freedom Forum, the return shows.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The weekly newsmagazines have been declared dinosaurs as far back as the late 1980s. But now that 111 employees at Washington Post Co.’s Newsweek have taken buyouts, including many longtime editors, it’s clear that their cultures are finally being blown up and reinvented. And some say that’s not such a bad thing.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Matthew Felling will host “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today. The show can be heard on DC’s National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.5 from 12-2pm.

  • Radio Ink reports, “In a letter to FCC Chairman Kevin Martin, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) notes that, although the Department of Justice has unconditionally approved the merger of XM Satellite Radio and Sirius Satellite Radio, ‘serious concerns remain as to how this merger will impact consumers if it is permiited to go forward.’”

  • FBLA Exclusive: Interview with Randi Rhodes’ Ex-Writer Barry Crimmins

  • NPR announced, “A special edition of NPR’s news-talk program Talk of the Nation will broadcast live from the Newseum on Tuesday, April 8, 2:00-4:00PM (ET). This broadcast — the first live national program from the new Washington, D.C.-based interactive museum of news – is part of the Newseum’s press preview day, in advance of its public opening on Friday, April 11, and will have a studio audience.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Just as the Eliot Spitzer sex scandal became the ultimate water-cooler conversation topic — if only for a few days — Sirius Satellite Radio launched Client 9 Radio, a 24/7 all-Spitzer channel, but just for a few days.”

  • New York Times reports, “In what would be the latest twist in the increasingly contentious battle over the $20 billion buyout of Clear Channel Communications, hedge fund clients of the banks balking at financing the deal are reportedly threatening to pull their business if the banks don’t move ahead with the deal for the radio broadcaster.”

    Top of post

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • E&P reports, ” In a harsh press release, The White House slammed The New York Times for a Thursday column that criticized President Bush’s reaction to the economic crisis.”

    Top of post

    EVENTS

  • Julie Ocean played at the Rock n Roll Hotel saturday night. Teh band’s CD comes out May 13. Check out their website here.

  • A release announced, “Andrea Rodgers, President and CEO of The Courage Cup, an IRS designated 501(c) (3) non-profit corporation established to help at-risk urban youth, is pleased to announce that Legal Times is inviting Washington law firms to attend Meadow Matches and participate in a Charity Segway Polo Challenge. This exciting day of polo matches will bring Washington’s legal community together for a day of charity in the picturesque Virginia Piedmont.”

  • PDN Pulse offers, “A Sneak Peek At The Newseum”

  • USAToday reports, “Massive Newseum opens window on journalism”

  • Kurtz reports, “At Sparkly Newseum, The Glory Of the Story Goes Above the Fold”

  • Lorraine Ahearn writes, “Determined to make the news ‘fun’ and ‘fresh,’ the Newseum has something for everyone. A 100-foot-wide screen lets visitors experience for themselves what it’s like to be interviewed by, say, Charlie Rose — with the help of 3-D glasses and complimentary Breathe-Right strips.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Unlike that bombastic structure, the journalism museum makes no attempt to bow and scrape to classical traditions. It is sheathed in glass, not masonry, to reveal some of its activity inside and counter the sealed-up monumentality so prevalent in Washington.”

    Top of post

    BOOKS

  • The Washington City Paper writes, “For decades, D.C. has been hurting for a classic novel all its own. Some suggestions on how to make it.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Latin America Deputy Regional Editor and a Global Media Services (GMS) Unit Manager.

  • YMCA of Metropolitan Washington is looking for a Communications Specialist.

  • Greenpeace Inc. is looking for a Media Relations Director and a Graphic Designer.

  • National Geographic is looking for a Specialist ,Group Retention & Billing.

  • Forbes.com is looking for an Unpaid Intern.

  • Association of American Medical Colleges is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.25.08

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington (unless you’re Jewish, in which case you’re bummed that the WHCA dinner falls on Passover). And, on this day in 1961, JFK held the first televised conference. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio)

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think Maureen Dowd would take Eleanor Clift in a street fight.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Tight schedule makes NY Times endorse early

  • The AP reports, “U.S. newspapers’ online audiences grew about 6 percent last year, an industry group reported Thursday, a rare bit of good news for an industry struggling to adapt as readers and advertising dollars continue to migrate online.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “Public interest in economic news soared last week amid continued stock market volatility and concerns about a possible recession. More than four-in-ten Americans (42%) followed news about the condition of the U.S. economy very closely and 20% listed this as the single news story they followed more closely than any other. That marks the highest level of public interest in economic news in five years. Interest was only somewhat greater during the recession of the early 1990s.”

  • The Press Gazette reports,Rupert Murdoch has become bored with Britain and his now obsessed with his ‘new toy’ the Wall Street Journal. This was the view of Andrew Neil, former editor of the Sunday Times, who told peers this today to explain why the News International tycoon was no longer ringing the editor of The Sun every day to ask what she was publishing.”

  • A release announced, “Junior Achievement today announced the inductees into its 2008 U.S. Business Hall of Fame, one of the most prestigious honors awarded for success in the business world. Junior Achievement selects inductees for their business excellence, courageous thinking and actions, vision and innovation, inspiring leadership, and philanthropy.” Among the 2008 Junior Achievement U.S. Business Hall of Fame laureates is Al Neuharth, the founder of USA TODAY; Founder and former Chairman, The Freedom Forum; Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Gannett Co., Inc.

    Top of post

    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News will broadcast President George Bush’s State of the Union address live on Monday, January 28. Coverage will begin at 9:00 p.m., ET and will also include the Democratic response. Charles Gibson will anchor ABC’s coverage from Washington, D.C. He will be joined by ‘This Week’ anchor George Stephanopoulos, Chief White House Correspondent Martha Raddatz, and ABC News commentator George Will. Dan Bartlett, former Counselor to President Bush, will also contribute.”

  • Lindsay Czarniak and Will Thomas make Washington Life’s “Young & The Guest List.”

  • Last Call reports, “In an episode of ‘Family Guy’ that references an infamous vice presidential hunting trip, Karl Rove, Antonin Scalia and Tucker Carlson are inadvertently killed.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “New research from MindShare concludes that the writers strike, which began in November, is beginning to take a serious toll on TV viewing behavior. Almost half of those surveyed in the poll said they were spending more time online as a result of the repeat programming they have encountered because of the strike. More than 60% of viewers said their favorite shows were now in repeat mode.”

  • Eat The Press reports,Jon Stewart: ‘Oh, Bill Kristol, Are You Ever Right?’”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Megan Carpentier, Greg Wasserstrom and Hunter Walker have started “The Cynic’s Party.”

  • Washington Times reports on Media CEO Roger L. Simon, the impact of the Internet on politics and the business of blogging.

  • The Bloggies are coming! The Bloggies are coming!

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “No presidential campaign would be complete without self-flagellation by the press about its overreliance on ‘horse race’ coverage. Politico honchos John F. Harris and Jim VandeHei donned the hair shirts earlier this month to compose an apology on behalf of the political press corps for pushing so many horse-race inspired ‘bogus narratives’ on readers. Among the bogus narratives cited by VandeHarris were ‘McCain is dead’ from last summer; Huckabee has no chance in Iowa; Obama is a dud—no, Obama is the bee’s knees!—and the Clinton machine will die in New Hampshire. While I appreciate the pair’s candor, self-reflection, and regret, you can no more divorce ‘horseracism’ (to pinch Brian Montopoli’s coinage) from campaign coverage than you can divorce horseracism from the coverage of horse races.”

  • A release announced, “Helium (www.Helium.com), the leader in online citizen journalism, and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, the leader in international nonprofit journalism, join forces to raise awareness on critical global issues. The partnership provides Helium members with a platform to write about issues raised by the Pulitzer Center, including international affairs that have been underreported, misreported or not reported on at all. … The partnership is the first of its kind online, and gives citizen journalists the opportunity to win an esteemed journalism award from the Pulitzer Center. Helium members can compete by writing to any of Pulitzer’s featured global crisis issues. The Center will then pick from the top-ranked articles in each category and award the winning writer with a Pulitzer Center Citizen Journalism Award.”

  • Reuters reports, “Popular video Web site YouTube.com is opening up its service to run on millions more phones which are capable of using high-speed wireless links, the company said on Thursday. YouTube, a unit of Google Inc, says it is extending its service from a handful of phones to a broader range of devices used by 100 million consumers worldwide that rely on high-speed links to stream videos to mobile screens.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “CSTV.com, a collegiate sports media division of CBS Sports, said Wednesday it entered a digital marketing partnership with USA Today, making several of CSTV’s assets available on USAToday.com.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The Wall Street Journal’s Web site, WSJ.com, will keep a significant portion of its content behind its paid-subscription wall, News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch said Thursday. … Speculation that News Corp. would make WSJ.com a completely free site had been rife in recent months, since Mr. Murdoch had signaled he was contemplating lifting the subscription wall. Mr. Murdoch had indicated that lifting the pay wall could broaden the Journal’s online audience and boost its Web advertising revenue, offsetting any loss in subscription revenues.”

  • Check out the washingtonpost.com’s new “Buzz Map” feature. It graphically displays the most blogged about places in the D.C., Maryland and Virginia areas.

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • XM’s POTUS channel cancels a Maine program.

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News will offer live, comprehensive broadcast and webcast coverage of President George W. Bush’s final State of the Union Address and the Democratic response on Monday, January 28m beginning 9:00PM (ET). The program will air on NPR member stations around the country, and can be heard online at www.NPR.org. Robert Siegel, Senior Host of the NPR newsmagazine All Things Considered, anchors the special coverage. He will be joined by NPR News correspondents, political analysts and members of Congress providing analysis of a number of key themes in the President’s address. January 29, the NPR newsmagazine Morning Edition will offer additional coverage, with post-address analysis and up-to-the-minute news from Capitol Hill.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Financial Impact Editor.

  • The Futurist magazine is looking for an Editorial/Administrative Assistant.

  • The Winchester Star is looking for a reporter.

  • Safety Net Hospitals for Pharmaceutical Access is looking for a Supervising Editor.

  • The Montgomery County Sentinel is looking for a Reporter.

  • Inside Washington Publishers is looking for Print and online reporters.

  • Legal Times is seeking an Editorial Assistant.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.18.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think the Yankees will make it to the playoffs.

  • Starting on Friday, C-SPAN Radio 90.1 FM in the Washington/Baltimore area is now broadcasting three channels in HD. If you have an HD radio, you’ll be able to hear these three C-SPAN Radio stations for free at 90.1. For more info, click here.

  • A release announced, “In an effort to ensure transparency and accountability in the continuing debate over the future of media ownership in America, Representatives Maurice Hinchey (D-NY), Bart Stupak (D-MI), Louise Slaughter (D-NY) and Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) … wrote to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Kevin Martin to request his immediate attention to a number of controversies surrounding the FCC’s activities on ten scientific studies released by the agency in late July.”

  • Shelly Palmer, “award-winning inventor, technologist, composer and television producer” will be the featured speaker at a seminar hosted by the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. “Mr. Palmer’s presentation takes place 7- 9pm, Wednesday, September 26th at the Intelsat Building, 3007 Tilden Street, NW, Washington. Admission is free to students and NATAS members, $15 for non-NATAS members, payable at the door.”

  • Cable Takes A Ratings Hit

  • TheGarance has a guide to Iowa every political reporter should check out.

  • New York Magazine reports, “Denizens of the Wall Street Journal’s genteel newsroom were in need of smelling salts last Wednesday after reports surfaced that the paper’s new owner, Rupert Murdoch, brought Col Allan, the editor-in-chief of the New York Post, to a kick-the-tires meeting with their bosses.”

  • Al Neuharth, USA TODAY founder and former chair and chief executive officer of Gannett Co., Inc., addressed more than 1,200 guests and staff at a reception at USA TODAY’s headquarters in McLean, Va., on the eve of the 25th anniversary of the nation’s newspaper. Founded in 1982, USA TODAY’s launch was the most expensive and closely watched newspaper debut in history; 25 years later it is the nation’s top selling newspaper.” Check out his remarks here.

  • FishbowlNY reports, “The Kurt Eichenwald underage porn/cash payment story just got a hell of a lot more creepy.”

  • “PoliticsOnline and the World E-Gov Forum are proud to announce the list for nominations of the Top 10 Who Are Changing the World of Internet and Politics.” Check it out here.

  • Portfolio’s Jack Flack has “10 things that Rupert Murdoch may need to do with Dow Jones”

  • The International Center for Journalists announced, “Three leading journalists with long experience in business journalism will join the international faculty of China’s first Global Business Journalism Program at Beijing’s Tsinghua University. They include Robert J. Dowling, former managing editor of BusinessWeek International; Ann M. Morrison, former editor of Time Europe; and Nailene Chou Wiest, who was a Knight International Journalism Fellow in China and had worked for Reuters there. Wiest also will serve as the program’s co-director.”

  • The Etelos Ecosystem has partnered with the Web application company Entrecore.

  • Reuters reports, “Fears that a possible U.S. recession will sap advertising spending have soured investors on the media industry, but some entertainment companies just might be more resilient than Wall Street thinks.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The New York Post is about to find out whether a glossy magazine can lift the fortunes of a gritty tabloid. Hoping to increase Sunday circulation and high-end advertising, the Post is introducing Page Six Magazine starting this Sunday.”

  • Fox Business Network has a new logo.

  • Connecticut Post’s Paul Janensch writes, “Q: Professor News, why did many journalists call USA Today ‘McPaper?’ A: Because, they said, it was the news equivalent of fast food — easy to swallow but not very nourishing. The criticism may have been warranted in its early years. But ‘The Nation’s Newspaper,’ which turned 25 last week, has proven to be enormously successful and widely imitated.”

  • At 25, ‘McPaper’ Is All Grown Up

  • Reuters reports, “Six months after grabbing Oscar glory for his eco-documentary ‘An Inconvenient Truth,’ former Vice President Al Gore collected an Emmy Award on Sunday for his fledgling youth-oriented cable network, Current TV.”

  • Economist leaves news fluff to others

  • The Associated Press reports, “Shares of New York Times Co. hit a 52-week low for the second day in a row Thursday as a Goldman Sachs analyst cut his price target and lowered some earnings estimates, citing disappointing August ad revenue results.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “NYT Has Seen Future: It’s All the Blogging That’s Fit to Print”

  • WAMU 88.5 announced, “Senior Commentator and Washington, D.C., radio veteran Fred Fiske will celebrate 60 years on the airwaves in Washington, D.C., on September 27.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Reed Elsevier Plc and Wolters Kluwer NV, two publishers that abandoned a merger in 1998, should again consider combining because of the ‘compelling’ strategic and financial logic of such a step, Merrill Lynch & Co. said.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Dow Jones & Company and its main labor union have moved close to agreement on a contract for reporters and other employees at The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires, union officials said yesterday.”

  • From the Houston Chronicle, “Hardly a day passes without a reader (or two) accusing the paper of having an unabashed affinity for the opinions of ‘liberal’ columnists — eschewing those of conservatives. It’s a spurious assertion to which I reply: ‘What paper are you reading?’”

  • Chicago Tribune’s Michael Tackett writes, “The president lost another member of his senior staff Friday when Tony Snow ended his stint as White House press secretary. Snow is the third man to hold that job for President Bush, and by almost any measure, the best. His loss may be felt even more directly than that of the talented Mr. Rove.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “A newsroom without news editors might be the dream of many a trod-upon reporter. But if that really were the case, and it was online users instead who set the news agenda, a new report from The Project for Excellence in Journalism suggests the stories they’d choose to lead the day, and the sources of news to which they’d pay attention, would put us in a very different world of news.”

  • Check out Andrew Sullivan’s first reader contest and vote for the best movie line ever.

  • Daryn Kagan’s documentary film, “Breaking the Curse”, aired last night on WETA and will re-air tonight at 5PM.

  • Laura Rozen reports, “The network says it acted quickly when it discovered consultant Alexis Debat had misrepresented his credentials. But sources say a real investigation of his work is beginning only now.”

  • Gawker reports, “Times deputy managing editor Jonathan Landman, in one of his weekly memos to the staff about ‘Innovation,’ lays this deepness on you (emphasis ours): ‘Times have changed. Our online storytelling skills have evolved to the point where you really can get the whole story without reading a newspaper article.’”

  • The cover of Alan Greenspan’s new book, The Age of Turbulence: Adventures in a New World, features a cover portrait shot by U.S. News & World Report’s Jeff MacMillan several years ago for the magazine.

  • The Washington Post’s Frank Aherns writes, “The head of a burgeoning Afghan media empire looked down at his new BlackBerry, vibrating against a table in Washington earlier this week. ‘Afghan civilians injured in Gereshk suicide bombing,’ read the e-mail headline. Another day, another suicide bombing in another town. Another too-typical news event for Saad Mohseni’s stations to broadcast across a country where prime-time programming is scheduled to fit the nighttime hours when electrical generators are switched on.”

  • “News media organizations must become portfolio entrepreneurs that make experimentation and ‘iteration’ a way of life and that ‘put risk and speed at the center of the corporate altar,’ a new report from the Media Management Center concludes.”

  • A tipster tells us, “hotline is having a party, just later this fall. or so i hear.”

  • Variety reports, “News Corp. topper Peter Chernin has urged British TV chiefs to adopt innovative, risk-taking strategies and embrace new media — or risk extinction.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc is testing an experimental social network service called Mash that makes it easy for Yahoo users to share tidbits of their lives with friends and family online, the company said on Sunday. Mash, to which a limited number of public users began being invited as testers on Friday, was described by a spokeswoman as a new, next-generation service that is independent from the company’s 2-1/2 year-old Yahoo 360 degree profile service.”

  • NY Post reports, “By the time many of this fall’s new TV shows premiere later this month, a number of Web-savvy viewers will have already given their thumbs-up or thumbs-down. That’s because networks including NBC and Fox are offering free sneak peeks of the pilot episodes of their new shows online.”

  • Slate reports, “Why the WSJ Exodus Is Good for Murdoch”

  • New York Times reports, “Next year, The Wall Street Journal will introduce Pursuits, a glossy monthly magazine about the lifestyles of the rich, in hopes of drawing more ads for expensive consumer goods”

  • A reader writes in, “From a fan: Is Jose Antonio Vargas bumping fogies like Woodward off the front page? Vargas has had 9 front page stories on his online political beat. Where’s the NYT and WSJ?”

  • Forbes reports, “How’s USA Today celebrating it’s 25th anniversary this weekend? With shares of parent company Gannett at their lowest closing level in 10 years.”

  • AP reports USA Today “starts its second quarter century with plans to expand its brand beyond the world of journalism.”

  • E&P reports, “In another Web first, The New York Times has posted on its Web site a video Letter to the Editor from Charles Ferguson, the anti-war filmmaker, responding critically to L. Paul Bremer’s recent Op-Ed defending his order to dismantle the Iraqi Army in 2003 after the U.S. took Baghdad.”

  • Reuters reports, “Your cell phone may be one of the last spots around that’s relatively free of advertising — but not for long. Media and advertising companies have found a way of latching on to people’s handsets by beaming ads to them via Bluetooth, the same technology used in some hands-free headsets.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “The Screen Actors Guild announced Friday that it signed a contract to cover performers on “quarterlife,” a Web series that will debut Nov. 11 on MySpaceTV.com”

  • Need to Know News, LLC is looking for a Financial Markets Reporter.

  • The Guardian is looking for an Online Journalist.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Medical Writer.

  • The American Institute of Physics is looking for a News Reporter/Writer.

  • Diverse: Issues In Higher Education magazine is looking for a higher ed reporter.

  • ThinkTalk is seeking a Smart Dynamic Host.

  • UCG is looking for a Medical Coding Reporter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Social Policy Editor.

  • Stars and Stripes is looking for a Photo Graphics Technician.

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

  • The Washington Center for Politics & Journalism is offering a Politics & Journalism Semester Internship.

  • Campaign for America’s Future is looking for a Senior Communications Associate.

  • Spitfire Strategies is looking for a Senior Associate.

  • US Newsventures is looking for an Editor.

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Experienced Editor.

  • Girls’ Life is looking for an Online Editorial Director and Online Editorial Assistant.

  • TeamPeople is looking for a General Manager: Media Support, AV.

  • Legal Times is looking for an Advertising Director.

  • The Distilled Spirits Council is looking for a PR Manager.

  • The Hill newspaper is looking for a production designer/web assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • USA Today Turns 25

    Top-selling USA Today — “The nation’s newspaper” — is gearing up for its 25th anniversary on September 15.

    “When we decided to create a national newspaper we knew it had to be vastly different,” said Al Neuharth, founder of USA TODAY and former chairman and president of Gannett. “USA TODAY was designed to make newspaper readers out of the television generation. The innovation set in place 25 years ago did change the face of the new media and continues to have influence today.”

    “25 years later USA TODAY is stronger than ever,” says Craig Moon, publisher and president of USA TODAY. “We are committed to moving forward with the same enthusiasm and talent that have made this newspaper successful over the last two-and- a-half decades. USA TODAY will always remain at the forefront of the industry, providing information to our consumers in any way they would like it.”

    Some stats from the release:

      The newspaper has a circulation of 2.3 million with a daily readership of 4.4 million. Its website, USATODAY.com, is an award winning news site with 10.9 million visitors a month. The newspaper has more than 500 editorial staff and almost 2,000 total employees. In 2006, USA TODAY advertising pages totaled 4,387. USA TODAY’s International edition reaches more than 2.8 million readers traveling and working abroad and is printed in four countries.

    The paper is partnering with American University on a series of free live events to be held Sept. 10 through Sept. 14. In addition, a special exhibition of 25 USA TODAY front pages will be exhibited in the Katzen Arts Center throughout the week.

    The events hosted by American University will cover various topics including the First Amendment, reinventing the news business and how USA TODAY changed the media industry. Participants will include Founder Al Neuharth and Editor Ken Paulson. All events are open to the public but space is limited.