FishbowlNY TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Alex Burns’

Add MJ Lee to List of POLITICO Departures, Joins CNN Digital Politics

20140813js_mj_lee_005You can add MJ Lee to the growing wave of POLITICO reporters and editors who’ve been poached by CNN Digital Politics.  For those of you counting, Lee makes 5… Rachel Smolkin, Steven Sloan, Jedd Rosche and Eric Bradner all switched teams this fall.

“It’s as if Rachel built an arc and we’re following her two by two,” said a former POLITICO staffer turned CNNer who asked to remain anonymous.

But they’re not just flooding (pun intended) to CNN. MJ is the fourth POLITICO exit announced this week.  Alex Burns, Gregg Birnbaum and Dan Berman all jumped ship for gigs at new outlets in the past few days.  Sounds like a trend.  As for MJ, her hire was announced today via internal memo obtained by FishbowlDC.  See the note from Rachel Smolkin and CNN Money’s Lex Haris after the jump. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101

Freelancing 101Starting December 1, learn how to manage a top-notch freelancing career! In this online boot camp, you'll hear from freelancing experts on the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now!

Gregg Birnbaum Leaves POLITICO, Joins New York Daily News

More news of shakeups out of POLITICO. Gregg Birnbaum announced yesterday on Twitter that he would be stepping down as deputy managing editor at POLITICO, and will join the New York Daily News as their new managing editor and head of political content.

This morning, Colin Myler, NYDN editor in chief, announced Birnbaum’s appointment in a staff memo:

I am delighted to announce that Gregg Birnbaum is appointed Managing Editor, Head of Political Content.

Gregg is joining us from  Politico where he is currently a Deputy Managing Editor, supervising coverage of breaking news.

Before that, he was a government and politics reporter and editor at the New York Post holding the position of Political Editor for 10 years,  managing bureaus in Washington, Albany and City Hall.

Gregg will be joining us on January 5.

On a personal note, I’d like to thank Joel for his sterling work for the past two years. He has been a valued colleague and I wish him every success in his new executive role at New York 1.

Colin

Birnbaum’s departure from POLITICO is part of a recent exodus of big names from the news organization that includes Dan Berman and Alex Burns.

Alex Burns Leaving POLITICO

AFmafeDp

Senior political reporter for POLITICO, Alex Burns, is leaving the news outlet, according to Michael Calderone of Huffington Post Media.

Calderone claims that Burns had “recently been in talks with The New York Times about a New York-based position covering city and state politics.”

Burns, one of POLITICO’s best known and longest tenured reporters, has been with the organization since graduating from Harvard in 2008.

Round 3 Superlative Winners: Pamela Kirkland, Brad & Lauren Dayspring, Maggie Haberman

summersuperlatives(main)
Friday marked the end of the 2014 FishbowlDC Summer Superlatives after a long, grueling competition for more than 50 nominees in 10 categories.

PostTV, former XM-er Pamela Kirkland

In the category for Sexiest Radio Voice, former XM-er Pamela Kirkland, now with Washington PostTV, took the win, besting WMAL’s Chris Plante with nearly 50% of the 2,500+ votes in the category. Also nominated: XM’s Julie Mason and NPR’s Ari Shapiro and Robert Siegel.

 

Brad and Lauren Dayspring

In the Cutest Couple category, NRSC’s Brad and CNN’s Lauren Dayspring maintained a lead over competition, winning against Ron, partner, Singer Bonjean Strategies, and Sara Bonjean, president, Rose Strategies, FOX News’ Ed and CNN’s Shirley Henry, and POLITICO power couple Alex Burns and MJ Lee.

 

POLITICO's Maggie Haberman

Nominated for Best Writer, POLITICO’s Maggie Haberman and NYTimes Magazine’s Mark Leibovich held court against WaPo’s Nia-Malika Henderson, Yahoo’s Chris Moody, and NYTimesNeil Irwin. In the end, Haberman took the gold.

And in the category of Most Basic news outlet, POLITICO bested its competition, including Roll Call, The HillThe Washington Times, PBS Newshour, and NPR.

FishbowlDC Round 2 Superlative Winners: Jen Bendery, Dannia Hakki, Gindy

FishbowlDC Round 1 Superlative Winners: Jake Tapper, Ken Vogel, Kevin Cirilli

Congratulations to all involved! May you forever be remembered for your Fishbowl Superlative.

Round 3 Superlatives: Sexiest Radio Voice, Best Writing, Cutest Couple, Most #Basic

It’s time for Round 3 of the FishbowlDC Summer Superlatives, the final round of our journey back to high school to name our colleagues for how they should really be remembered.

This time, we bring you the final four categories, Sexiest Radio Voice, Best Writing, Cutest Couple, and Most #Basic. Voting in Round 3 will be different than Rounds 1 and 2. Voting will extend only through Friday, August 15 at 6pm and results will be hidden, with updates along the way on the site and at @FishbowlDC on Twitter.

The full class of FishbowlDC 2014 Summer Superlatives winners will be announced on Monday, August 18. Happy voting!

 
Sexiest Radio Voice

 
Best Writer


 
Cutest Couple

  • Brad (NRSC strategist) and Lauren (CNN publicist) Dayspring
  • Ron (partner, Singer Bonjean Strategies) and Sara (president, Rose Strategies) Bonjean
  • FOX News’ Ed and CNN’s Shirley Henry
  • POLITICO power couple Alex Burns and MJ Lee

 
Most #Basic


Politico Steps Up Their Video Game

Politico is doubling down on their video production efforts with the debut of a new, snazzy “Driving the Day” video series featuring Anna Palmer, Manu Raju, Alex Burns, and Jake Sherman. Much of the Washington-based media, including The Hill, WaPo, USA Today, and Politico have already made forays into digital video -with middling results. Poor audio quality, along with on-screen talent better suited for print have been hallmarks of the online political video genre. But Politico‘s latest venture -complete with theme music and cable net-style intro sequence -is a marked escalation in production values over their competitors.

It’s no surprise that the political media would be eager to put their talent in front of cameras. It’s good business. Indeed, Politico pioneered a web-to-cable strategy that is largely credited with their meteoric rise to prominence. The website is housed in the same Arlington office building as fellow Allbritton Communications property WJLA ABC 7, and was able to take advantage of the station’s satellite hook-up to feed their reporters remotely onto the cable news channels.* The result was an explosion in name recognition for the brand as well as for the stable of reporters who could easily offer analysis on MSNBC or CNN without those networks having to do the work of bringing them in-studio.

Now, all the other DC pubs are following suit and web videos are a part of the strategy -essentially serving as sophisticated cable news audition videos for print talent. But Politico is still at the leading edge. Palmer, Raju, Burns, and Sherman are hardly as television-ready as say, Patrick Gavin -who was one of top contenders to replace Howie Kurtz on CNN’s “Reliable Sources,” but Politico clearly believes in them enough to give them a platform to develop their skills.

*Update, 2.19.14, 8:26 PM: It should also be noted that Politico had a partnership early on with “Face the Nation” and CBS News which resulted in John Harris, Jim VandeHei, and other Politico personalities making many appearances on that network prior to and coinciding with appearances on cable channels. 

Barack Obama: Underwood Gets Stuff Done. Alex Burns: False.

Barack Obama thinks DC pols should act more like House of Cards‘ Rep. Frank Underwood (D -SC).

He told a bunch of tech CEO’s today at the White House, “I was looking at Kevin Spacey['s character Underwood], I was thinking man, this guy gets a lot of stuff done.”

Politico’s senior political reporter Alex Burns begs to differ:

 

 

Burns forgets though – Frank Underwood also does a lot of rowing.

 

He also clearly spends lots of time coming up with witty asides and pithy monologues.

10 Journos You Don’t Want to Fight on Twitter

We’re not sure what we did for entertainment before we could watch what probably should be journalists’ private feuds unfold in public on Twitter. For all the talk about teens who have no social-networking shame, there are a few grownups in the media who haven’t seemed to learn the lesson either. Some days, our Washington Twitter lists look more like a Beltway Fight Club than they do a group of media elites.

Not that we’re complaining. We do need something to watch between episodes of Veep and Scandal reruns, and the journalists on our list below don’t disappoint. Fair warning though—if you take some of them on, you doing so at your own risk.

Honorable mentions: The Daily Caller’s Jim Treacher, Conservative radio host Dana Loesch, WaPo‘s Greg Sargent, the DNC’s communications director, Brad Woodhouse, and NRSC’s Brad Dayspring. If you don’t think Dayspring can fight, read this story published last night in which he was referred to as a “rabid dog.”

Here it is, FishbowlDC’s 10 Journalists You Don’t Want to Fight on Twitter:

Read more

Male Reporters Harden Stances on Weiner Clash With Female Scribes

Some male reporters felt the need to get in a dick swinging contest with Donald Trump this afternoon. The subject matter: Ironically, ex-Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.).

On Wednesday we reported that TWT Senior Op-ed Writer Emily Miller wrote that she and a female colleague Susan Crabtree had alleged that Weiner had harassed them during conversations on Capitol Hill. In Miller’s case, she says a heated Weiner got inches from her face and subjected her to humiliating sexual comments as she tried to question him on the sexting scandal. Crabtree, meanwhile, says Weiner erected his middle finger at her in the Speaker’s Lobby in front of gobs of reporters.

Today, Trump, an expert on pretty much everything known to mankind, retweeted Miller’s story and the crowd went wild. Because retweets actually do mean endorsements now don’t they? Trump wrote, “Must read article by @EmilyMiller: ‘Anthony Weiner is a twit who treats women like dirt.’”

BuzzFeed‘s Andrew Kaczynski (pictured at left) and Politico‘s Alex Burns  jumped all over it, equating that Trump being divorced and sending nasty missives to a columnist was equivalent to harassing women in the workplace.

Burns pointed to a story in New York magazine story in which columnist Gail Collins, the first woman to hold the position of Editorial Page Editor at NYT, recounts the time Trump sent her story back to her with her face circled with “The Face of a Dog” written all over it. Burns added, “Seriously, Donald Trump doesn’t demean women?” And Kaczynski cracked, “Twice divorced Trump.”

Miller (pictured above in pink) shot back on Twitter, “Divorce has NOTHING to do with demeaning women in the workplace.” She told FishbowlDC, “I am shocked these male reporters will do anything to defend Anthony Weiner’s pattern of harassing female reporters on Capitol Hill. Clearly, they can’t understand how humiliating it was for us and how difficult Weiner made it to do our job.”

She remarked on what it was like to interview Weiner versus Trump. Read more

Politico, Salon, Overhype Juan Williams’ ‘Plagiarism’

First it’s Juan Williams blames the researcher. Then it’s Williams blames the “intern.” Suddenly his “researcher” became his “intern.” In the course of one column in The Hill, which was corrected and explained, followed by The Hill carefully investigating months worth of Williams’ columns to determine any existence of a pattern of “lifting,” by Salon and Politico standards, he became a plagiarist. Politico‘s headline this morning: “Juan Williams lifts work, blames the assistant.” And Salon‘s last night: “Juan Williams’ plagiarism problem.”

Only it’s a matter of interpretation. One publication’s “plagiarism” is another’s “honest mistake.”

“Is there anything lamer than blaming a researcher for plagiarism?” writes Politico‘s Alexander Burns on Twitter this morning. As a matter of fact, there is. How about calling something plagiarism that isn’t? Salon broke the original story last night with the aforementioned overhyped headline. Has this happened to Williams before? Is there a pattern? Actually, no. At least not shown by way of example in either story published in Salon or Politico. Williams, also a Fox News Contributor, did not try to hide anything. He made a mistake and the publication did everything in its power to correct it, including being honest with readers in an editor’s note just as Williams was with editors of The Hill.

The events unfold

Williams’ column was published Feb 18. In the column, as reported by Politico, a researcher had given Williams information that Williams thought were the researcher’s own words. Williams reworded it some, not realizing that the researcher had received the information from the Center for American Progress. CAP sent an email to The Hill the next day. But the recipient was on vacation and higher ups were told about it Feb 28. The Hill then moved quickly but methodically and Editor Hugo Gurdon (not “Gordon” as Politico has it) spoke with CAP on Feb 28, March 1 and March 2 and completed revisions to the article done on March 2.

The Hill took other steps not mentioned in the Politico or Salon stories — they reviewed months of Williams’ work to make sure there was no pattern of errors.

“CAP contacted us after Juan’s column came out to say several paragraphs were from one of their articles,” Gurdon wrote FishbowlDC by email. “The complaint was justified and we looked through all Juan’s columns back to October to make sure there was no pattern. There was nothing in them to suggest this was anything other than an isolated incident.”

Gurdon called Williams to learn more. Read more

NEXT PAGE >>