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Posts Tagged ‘Anne Hull’

Top 10 Works of Journalism of Decade Include D.C. Scribes and Judges

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As alerted to us by Jay Rosen, a journalism professor at NYU, the faculty at NYU have chosen the top 10 works of journalism in the United States for the past decade between 2000-2009.

Some D.C. journos made the cut.

Number 6
Jane Mayer
The Dark Side: The Inside Story of How the War on Terror Turned into a War on American Ideals, 2008
A thorough and damning investigation, based on her New Yorker articles, of the Bush administration’s more questionable tactics in the war on terror. Read the piece here.

Number 9
Anne Hull, Dana Priest (reporters) and Michel du Cille (photographer)
Soldiers Face Neglect, Frustration at Army’s Top Medical Facility, February 2007, The Washington Post
This two-part, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation of abuses at Walter Reed Army Medical Center exposed the substandard treatment soldiers received at this Washington, D.C., hospital and led to firings, resignations, government investigations and efforts to better care for those returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Read the piece here.

Read the full list here.

Judges outside NYU including D.C.’s own Juan Williams of NPR: Madeleine Blais (University of Massachusetts), Gene Roberts (former editor Philadelphia Inquirer and New York Times), Dorothy Rabinowitz (Wall Street Journal), Morley Safer (60 Minutes), Ben Yagoda (University of Delaware), Eric Newton (Knight Foundation), Leon Dash (University of Illinois), Juan Williams (NPR), Sylvia Nasar (Columbia) and Greil Marcus (cultural critic).

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Morning Reading List, 10.13.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Midday Tidbits

  • From a tipster:

      Chucky T will be doing the 3pm hour on MSNBC today. Meet the Press tryout??

  • Lots of local news orgs made the finals of the 2008 Online Journalism Awards.

  • Erin McPike gets her digital camera on.

  • Woodward’s New ‘Wash Post’ Contract Includes Less Pay, Same Deal — As His ‘Bush IV’ Book Nears Publication

  • William Beutler, Kevin Drum, the Dallas Morning News and Ezra Klein (Stacy McCain, too!) weigh in the AJR’s glowing Politico piece.

  • New NBC DC Bureau Chief Mark Whittaker talks with NPR.

  • Lovejoy Award goes to WaPo’s Anne Hull.

  • Turns out the Politico sent out a similar “get back to work!” email (just like The Hill). Any one want to pass it along?

  • Speaking of Politico: “Embargo on Suskind’s Book Damn Near Holds; Politico Gets the Scoop on Alleged Bush Administration Forgery.”

  • Morning Reading List, 04.09.08

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    Good morning Washington. It’s Joe Scarborough’s birthday! Also: Hugh Hefner and Jenna Jameson (why are we not surprised they share a day…thanks MicCheck). Also, on this day in 1865, Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | NEWS NOTES | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • Most of you have broken a bone.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “My best friend was laid off, and she was the smartest person there. There was no good reason. It was ‘budgetary.’ I have no more faith in this industry.”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The slow-drip continues…more WHCA news.

  • Pulitzer Day: Keller Brings Up ASME’s, Polks; WaPo Rager

  • Hillary Clinton (55%) finished narrowly behind Barack Obama (56%) in the race for press exposure last week. But a Clinton-centric narrative was the focus of the campaign coverage for March 31-April 6, according to a Project for Excellence in Journalism study.”

  • The AP reports, “Newspaper readers agree with editors on the basics of what makes good journalism, but they are more apt to want looser rules for online conversations, a new study on news credibility has found.”

  • The Cornell Daily Sun reports, “Yesterday afternoon, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Nicholas D. Kristof delivered a lecture on the current human rights violations in Sudan and China’s controversial involvement in the continuation of the civil conflict. The New York Times columnist has visited the war-torn region of Darfur in Sudan on several occasions and urges the international community — especially Americans — to focus their attention on providing more aid, including political relief, in hope of ending the genocide.”

  • CJR’s Dean Starkman writes, “The big winner in yesterday’s Pulitzers? The investigation. Sure, The Washington Post won six. But newspapering’s highest—and most important—form won at least that many. Not only did our brothers and sisters upstairs on the Pulitzer Board award two investigative prizes, to Walt Bogdanich and Jake Hooker of The New York Times and to the Chicago Tribune staff for work on tainted medicine and consumer goods, an investigative thread ran through most of the major awards—including the Public Service award, given to The Washington Post staff for the work of Dana Priest, Anne Hull, and photographer Michel du Cille.”

  • Plain Dealer Columnist Ted Diadiun writes, “‘There is no patent on a good idea,’ an editor friend used to say. The pithy comment essentially summed up the source of most good newspaper stories: Other people.”

  • Dave Barry writes, “I’ve had many entertaining arguments with Gene on a wide range of issues, including which of us has a bigger oosik. (An oosik is the bone from the penis of a walrus. Gene and I each own one.) We’ve both won some arguments and lost some; neither of us, to my recollection, has ever been gracious about it. One of the running jokes that developed between us is that at some point in the argument, usually early, I will remind Gene that I have won a Pulitzer Prize, and he has not. I have used this particular argument — this is a conservative estimate — 119 million times. And Gene has never had a good answer for it. Until today. I am very pleased to report that Mr. Gene Weingarten has won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. Gene, congratulations on an honor that is well-deserved and overdue. I’m thrilled for you, and genuinely happy that I can never use that particular argument against you again.”

  • Check out yesterday’s chat with Pulitzer Prize-winner Gene Weingarten.

  • E&P’s Joe Strupp reports, “Inside Word at Pulitzer Announcement: Entries Down, But Online Up.” Also, E&P has a round-up of winners and their stories, including Steven Pearlstein, Gene Weingarten, Amy Harmon, David Umhoefer, The Chicago Tribune editors and Michael Ramirez.

  • AJR’s John Morton writes, “Shortsighted cutbacks pose a serious threat to the future of newspapers.”

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    TV

  • TVNewser’s Steve Krakauer says, “Strategy Room Becomes Part of FNC Weekend.”

  • An ABC release announced, “‘ABC’s World News with Charles Gibson’ placed 1st among key demo viewers last week, tying NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ in the demo rating and share; both broadcasts averaged a 2.1/8 among Adults 25-54. Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ averaged 7.98 million, placing second. Compared to a year ago, ‘World News’ posted gains among key demo viewers, increasing 6%. Additionally, for the twelfth time in thirteen weeks, the ABC News broadcast won among Women 25-54, averaging a 2.4/9.’”

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of March 31, 2008. The Williams-led newscast averaged 8.267 million total viewers”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Disney’s Bob Iger Explains Why ABC Passed On CNN Outsourcing, Why Media Concentration Is ‘A Joke’”

  • Silver Spring-based Discovery unveiled to advertisers yesterday its celebrity-encrusted plans for the new cable network Planet Green — the Prius of programming. Planet Green rises like the phoenix from the ashes of Discovery Home at 6 p.m. on June 4.

  • Small cable firms protest

  • CBS layoffs signal a financial squeeze on TV stations

  • DCTRV reports, “NBC Washington started handing out Sony HD cameras to all network field crews on Thursday, 4/3. NBC currently has four HD edit suits available and plans on upgrading the microwave system to full HD by the end of the summer.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Reuters reports, “Viral sensation Obama Girl and satirical political corruption fighters Swift Kids for Truth along with Web sites for the New York Times and National Public Radio (NPR) have been nominated for Webby awards.”

  • Britannica Blog reports, “We’ll launch our blog forum on ‘Newspapers & the Net’ with an excerpt from Nick’s book. Throughout this forum assorted writers, journalists, bloggers, and media scholars will discuss and debate the state of newspapers in the digital age. Some of the participants will address Nick’s ideas directly, and others will talk generally about the impact of new media on traditional avenues of publishing. Lively debate will occur along the way, and we welcome your input, your comments and perspectives, and encourage your participation in these discussions.”

  • PostGlobal launched a blog called “Pomfret’s China“. “It will be
    written by Outlook Editor of The Washington Post John Pomfret and will cover the political, economic, and cultural elements playing into China’s rise as a world power.” Also coming to washingtonpost.com is “Intel Dump” by Phillip Carter. His blog will explore issues of national security and intelligence relating to American diplomatic, military and economic power.”

  • “C-SPAN wants to know, ‘What issue in this election is most important to you, and why?’ Shoot a short video response to this question and post it on our YouTube page! Now through the eve of the Pennsylvania primaries, YouTube users and C-SPAN viewers can upload their video to the YouTube/C-SPAN webpage.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Atlantic Media, owner of The Atlantic and National Journal, is close to selling its controlling stake in 02138 magazine to Sandow Media, WWD has learned. A spokesman for Sandow confirmed that the deal was in its final stages, but said it had not closed.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Former MSNBC VP Tammy Haddad, now president of Haddad Media, has been named to the Folio: 40. An annual list of magazine industry ‘influencers and innovators.’ Haddad is honored for showing ‘the magazine world that producing compelling video content doesn’t have to be an expensive proposition.’ Hadded is working with Newsweek on their video ventures.”

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    RADIO

  • DCRTV reports, “DC-based XM Satellite Radio will broadcast from the Newseum during the grand opening festivities on Friday, 4/11. XM’s presidential election channel (XM-130) will be live from the new newsgathering museum on Capitol Hill from 11 AM to 4 PM. Also, DCRTV hears that former WMALer Chris Core, who now works for the POTUS channel, will emcee the opening from 7 AM to 9 AM Friday.”

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    NEWS NOTES

  • Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam writes, “Samantha Power didn’t get the memo! Nor, apparently, did retired John F. Kennedy School of Government — sorry, Harvard Kennedy School — professor Francis Bator. Both have been using the K-School’s ‘old’ name in communications of late. The Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, whose ‘discussion papers’ stare up at me from the bottom of my wastebasket, is still using the no-longer operative moniker, ‘John F. Kennedy School . . . etc., etc.’”

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • The Washington Social Diary reports, “True to its nature, in this town the power lunch spots get ranked in hierarchical order. The top is the top, meaning the leading power dining room would be the White House ‘Mess.’ The name belies its quiet authority, sitting as it does in the West Wing basement, under the Oval Office, and across the hall from the ‘Sit Room.’”

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    JOBS

  • Arcom Publishing, Inc. is looking for a Staff Reporter.

  • Bristol Herald Courier is looking for a Sports Editor.

  • The Advisory Board Company is seeking a Copy Editor, Health Line Group.

  • Patuxent Publishing Co. is looking for a General Assignment Reporter.

  • PBS Newshour is looking for a Desk Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Pulitzers Announced…WaPo Cleans Up

    Where the WaPo took home the gold:

    Public Service:

      Awarded to The Washington Post for the work of Dana Priest, Anne Hull and photographer Michel du Cille in exposing mistreatment of wounded veterans at Walter Reed Hospital, evoking a national outcry and producing reforms by federal officials.

    Breaking News Reporting:

      Awarded to The Washington Post Staff for its exceptional, multi-faceted coverage of the deadly shooting rampage at Virginia Tech, telling the developing story in print and online.

    National Reporting:

      Awarded to Jo Becker and Barton Gellman of The Washington Post for their lucid exploration of Vice President Dick Cheney and his powerful yet sometimes disguised influence on national policy.

    International reporting:

      Awarded to Steve Fainaru of The Washington Post for his heavily reported series on private security contractors in Iraq that operate outside most of the laws governing American forces.

    Feature Writing:

      Awarded to Gene Weingarten of The Washington Post for his chronicling of a world-class violinist who, as an experiment, played beautiful music in a subway station filled with unheeding commuters.

    Commentary:

      Awarded to Steven Pearlstein of The Washington Post for his insightful columns that explore the nation’s complex economic ills with masterful clarity.

    (Oh, and Bob Dylan won a Pulitzer, too)

    As E&P notes, this is the second biggest sweep by a single paper ever (the NYT took home seven in 2002, thanks to its Sept. 11 coverage).

    And: Does this silence some of the anti-Len Downie chatter (accurate or not) we’ve been hearing recently?

    Congrats to all.

    More NPF Notes

    (Earlier: “Party Photos: National Press Foundation Dinner“)

    Some more notes from Thursday’s National Press Foundation Dinner (full list of winners and honorees here):

    -”Despite buyouts and layoffs, we need to keep doing our jobs, honestly and aggressively, now more than ever.” WSJ’s John Wilke (winner of one of the Everett McKinley Dirksen Awards for Distinguished Reporting of Congress)

    -1250 people in the audience (most ever)

    -They raised $800,000, $100,000 over last year.

    -WSJ’s Jerry Seib paid tribute to ABC’s John McWethy in his remarks.

    -In his remarks, the Houston Chronicle’s Jeff Cohen (recipient of The Benjamin C. Bradlee Editor of the Year Award) urged attendees to “keep fighting” for a federal shield law.

    -The Washington Post’s Dana Priest, who along with Anne Hull, won the Worth Bingham Prize for Investigative Journalism, said that “things have not been fixed as much as they should have” at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. “There’s so much work to be done.”

    -Mocking his age, the NYT’s Thomas Friedman (who took home the W. M. Kiplinger Distinguished Contributions to Journalism Award) quoted from Pete Seeger’s “My Get Up And Go Has Got Up And Went” during his remarks.

      I get up each morning and dust off my wits

      Open the paper and read the obits

      If I’m not there, I know I’m not dead

      So I eat a good breakfast and go back to bed

    Friedman assured the audience that he’s “only been on book leave for four months…I’ll be back….”

    He also put a positive spin on the doom-and-gloom scenarios being realized in newsrooms everywhere. “More people are engaged in journalism than ever before…I intend to stick around to see how this story ends.”

    Friedman thanked his wife, Ann, and his “other family, my New York Times family,” saying “without these two families I would have had a lifetime with a lot less achievement.”

    Priest/Hull Begin Awards Sweep

    From the release:

      Dana Priest and Anne Hull of the Washington Post are the 2008 winners of the Selden Ring Award for Investigative Reporting for their coverage of conditions at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

      The $35,000 annual prize, presented by the School of Journalism at the USC Annenberg School for Communication, recognizes the year’s outstanding work in investigative journalism that led to direct results.

      Beginning in February 2007, the Post published a series of articles detailing how the once “crown jewel of military medicine” has been transformed into “a holding ground for physically and psychologically damaged outpatients” living in poor conditions and struggling in a “messy bureaucratic battlefield nearly as chaotic as the real battlefields they faced overseas.”

    Morning Reading List, 02.19.08

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    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • The Oscars are your favorite awards show.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Science News, the weekly magazine of the Society for Science & the Public, has named Jonathan Oleisky its new associate publisher.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Readers are super-sensitive to any perceived slight to their favorite candidate — from Page 1 display to photos to the details of graphics. And they want guidance from The Post in issues coverage and editorial endorsements before they vote. Several readers were unhappy that on last Sunday’s front page, Sen. Barack Obama’s Feb. 9 primary victories were played below a story on the Washington Redskins naming Jim Zorn as head coach.”

  • William McGurn on “Press Corps Quagmire

  • Reflections of a Newsosaur reports, “Now that pending layoffs at the New York Times and Los Angeles Times have made newsroom cutbacks all but unanimous, some managers eager to maximize the feet on the street at their newspapers are wondering if they really need all those editors.”

  • A release announced, “The International Center for Journalists, the Washington-based nonprofit organization, is seeking nominations for the 2008 Knight International Journalism Awards. The Awards recognize international journalists who demonstrate an extraordinary devotion to the craft by upholding the highest journalistic standards despite overwhelming challenges.”

  • Crains New York reports, “On the heels of a 13% plunge in December’s advertising revenue, The New York Times said last week that it would cut 100 newsroom jobs over the course of this year. The paper isn’t the only suffering media business. Radio ad revenue for the New York marketplace took a slide in January, and television insiders predict a low-single-digit ad revenue drop in the first quarter for the local marketplace. Add magazines to the mix: Some are seeing the bottom fall out of their ad page counts.”

  • “Pundit Police Watch News Talkers

  • Stephen Hunter talks about his heart attack.

  • Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson asks, “Are the news media being beastly to Hillary Clinton? Are political reporters and commentators — as Bill Clinton suggested but didn’t quite come out and say in a radio interview Tuesday — basically in the tank for Barack Obama?” In response, Terence Smith writes, “Gene’s answer: no and no. My view: yes and yes.”

  • The New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes, “Three articles in The Times last month raised an intriguing question: When does fairness demand that a newspaper walk down the middle in a scientific dispute, and when does responsibility demand that it take sides? It is hardly a new question, and The Times, historically, has been slow to declare victors.”

  • A release announced, “The American Society of Newspaper Editors has selected the winners of its annual awards for distinguished writing and photography.” Among the winners are Anne Hull and Dana Priest, The Washington Post for their stories “exposing the deep and widespread problems at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.”

  • Edward Wasserman, the Knight professor of journalism ethics at Washington and Lee University, writes, “Beneath the somber tales of shrinking revenues and staff cuts is an even more somber reality about the news business: The nearly two-century-old marriage between consumer advertising and journalism is on the rocks.”

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz writes, “Coverage Adds to Clinton’s Steep Climb”

  • The New Yorker reports, “few days before Senator Barack Obama swept the Democratic primaries in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia, people across the country, picking up their favorite newspaper, were greeted with the following headline: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Big Part In Obama’s Young Life. In any event, that’s what some readers thought they read. On second glance, they realized their mistake. The headline actually said this: Old Friends Say Drugs Played Bit Part In Obama’s Young Life. Maybe, though, the mistake wasn’t just the readers’, especially the bleary-eyed among them who hadn’t yet had their morning coffee. After all, it wasn’t exactly news that ‘drugs’ had played a part (and only a ‘bit part’ at that) in the adolescence of the junior senator from Illinois. That particular factoid had been on the public record for more than twelve years. And if it wasn’t news, what was it doing on the front page of the New York Times?”

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “The Washington Post Co. has acquired $60 million worth of shares of Corinthian Colleges Inc. over the past three weeks as part of its push to grow its education business.”

  • Market Watch reports, “A pair of hedge funds seeking representation on the board of directors of New York Times Co. disclosed on Thursday that they have raised their stake in the media company above 10%. Firebrand Partners and Harbinger Capital Partners reported holding 15.1 million New York Times shares, or a 10.54% stake, after a Harbinger fund bought 441,100 Class A shares for $17.62 a share on Tuesday. The funds had previously reported holding 14.25 million shares for a 9.96% stake.”

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    TV

  • Do we have too many pundits? Paul Farhi looks into it.

  • A CNN release announced, “This Week in Politics will move to the 6 p.m. (ET) time slot on Saturdays beginning this weekend. The one-hour program, anchored by Tom Foreman, previously aired at 7 p.m. on Saturdays.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Some Shuster Defense on Rival Networks”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “It’s official: The strike drove writers nuts. No, not TV and film writers. Journalists. Fourteen weeks of covering bitter trench warfare between the Writers Guild of America and the studios, and the ink-stained wretches are feeling wretched. It’s not just that covering a complex, polarizing news story for more than three months left them fried. The worst part has been the blowback. And we don’t mean from the studios and networks, either. No, friends, it’s the ugliest kind of warfare: writer on writer.”

  • TVNewser reported this weekend, “This morning on Fox & Friends Weekend, an entirely new group of anchors graced the FNC screen. Ainsley Earhardt, Adam Housley and Clayton Morris greeted viewers at 7amET. Johnny Dollar has some clips of the trio’s first day.”

  • From Playbook: “ABC’s Ann Compton e-mails that when President Bush landed today in rural Arusha, Tanzania, in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro, he was greeted by Masai tribal dancers, hundreds of cheering Africans lining the — and three people, standing apart, waving OBAMA signs. ‘Not certain whether Bush saw them,’ Ann writes. ‘Just bought Mike Allen a ZEBRA — bringing it home on press plane. Really!’”

  • Washington Post reports, “In Washington, politics and the press always manage to inject themselves into the proceedings, even at a music awards show honoring the best and brightest on the local music scene. So at a long-standing music awards ceremony like the Wammies, you pretty much expect that at some point, CBS newsman Bob Schieffer is going to take to the stage. After all, there is no moment more quintessential D.C., more inside-the-Beltway, than the sight of Schieffer — who won a Spotlight Award last night — rocking at the mike with the local band Honky Tonk Confidential, speak-singing with a country-western twang a little ditty called ‘TV Anchorman.’ He also extolled the wonders of the ‘American dream’ — and promised that after the presidential inauguration next year he’ll forswear TV life for a full-time music career.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “ABC newsman Bob Woodruff’s long recovery from a brain injury suffered in an IED attack in 2006 in Iraq is turning a new page. Literally. He tells us that in the upcoming paperback version of his hit book, In an Instant, his kids will write of how they dealt with their father’s injury, coma, and recovery.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Washington Post reports,Barry Schuler moved to Washington from Silicon Valley to join AOL during its golden days, one of the many top technology professionals the Internet giant recruited to the region. But when the former chief executive left in 2003, he returned to California to become an investor and start a technology company, following other executives who have drifted away from the region. … Departures like Schuler’s are one reason Washington’s technology industry is still struggling to mature a decade after Dulles-based AOL became a magnet for talent.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Media Work Force Sinks to 15-Year Low”

  • The Guardian reports, “Media companies including the BBC, Channel 4, Google, Yahoo and social-networking site Bebo have signed up to a new code of conduct … designed to give parents more information about the suitability for children of audiovisual content available on the internet and mobile phones.”

  • Ad Age.com reports, “With recession talk in the air, marketers are scrutinizing their spending. But old, reliable tricks such as counting on coupons to goose sales might not work this time around. Luckily, cheaper options abound in emerging media such as mobile, e-mail and search.”

  • Variety reports, “Amid all the recent headlines about tie-ups and acquisitions involving Yahoo, Microsoft, Google and Facebook, one player continues to look more like a perpetual bridesmaid than bride. Few could dispute that AOL, the onetime buyer of Time Warner, has become a burr under its parent company’s saddle financially. Q4 2007 results released Feb. 6 showed an array of less-than-scintillating numbers. Division revenue slipped below 10% of the conglom’s total for the first quarter since 2000. Fiscal-year operating profit was just 14% of the total. Display ad revenue gained just 3% for the quarter, to $252 million, and paid search rose only 1%.”

  • Arianna Huffington writes, “The Right Strengthens its Hold on McCain, the Media Refuse to Notice”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Reed Elsevier, the Anglo-Dutch media group, is drawing up plans to axe more than 1,000 jobs as part of a continuing efficiency drive, The Sunday Telegraph has learned. The company, which owns the LexisNexis information service and the medical journal, The Lancet, is understood to be preparing to cut the jobs over the next couple of years as it centralises functions such as procurement, human resources and IT across the group. Analysts expect the job cuts — the majority of which will take place outside Britain — to contribute to a restructuring that will shed as much as £100m from Reed’s annual costs bill. It is unclear whether the cuts will be acknowledged formally in its annual results announcement on Wednesday.”

  • Kiplinger.com’s Business Resource Center launched a new Politics blog. Check it out here.

  • The Telegraph reports, “AOL, the American internet company, is attempting to piece together a deal with Yahoo! designed to help the Silicon Valley-based search engine evade the clutches of Microsoft, the world’s biggest software group”

  • New York Times reports, “In the middle of a media-saturated political season, Jared Kushner, publisher of The New York Observer, has been quietly nurturing an ambitious political journalism venture. The plan is to pull together 50 Web sites, one for each state, into a political hub called Politicker.com. Each site will serve as an intensely local source for political articles, speculation and scandal, Mr. Kushner said.”

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press reports, “Illinois Shooting Tragedy Pushes Election Off The Top, Mostly”

  • Chris Cillizza admits, “The Fix is a non-voter — for a few reasons”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Washington Monthly may team up with Common Cause.

  • “In the press, Hillary has been trapped by her own story, whereas Obama has been freed by his,” writes John Heilemann.

  • New York Post reports, “While magazine circulation inched up an average of just 1.1 percent in the second half of 2007, a few magazines with innovative approaches and partnerships managed to beat the odds.”

  • The Feed reports, “Time magazine senior political analyst Mark Halperin joined a small, yet growing club this week, when he issued an apology for saying John Edwards considered Barack Obama ‘kind of a pussy’ on a satellite radio talk show.”

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    RADIO

  • FMQB reports, “Clear Channel Communications released its 2007 and Q4 fiscal results, with the company’s quarterly profit up 51.7 percent. Earnings in the quarter jumped from $211 in 2006 to $320 million in 2007. Revenue was up four percent to $1.84 billion. For the entire year, revenue was up six percent to $6.82 billion. Net income increased by 37 percent to $938.5 million.”

  • Canadian Business reports, “XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. spent roughly $1.2 million in 2007 to lobby for approval of its proposed $5 billion acquisition by rival Sirius Satellite Radio Inc., among other issues. The satellite radio operator spent $580,000 in the second half of 2007 to lobby Congress and the Department of Justice about the pending merger, according to a disclosure form posted online Tuesday by the Senate’s public records office.”

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    BOOKS

  • Newsweek asks, “What to make of ‘Ultimate Blogs: Masterworks From the Wild Web’? The new book, edited by Sarah Boxer, the New York Times’s first (now former) ‘Web critic,’ endeavors to compile an anthology of the best posts from the best Web logs. ‘W,’ you might ask, ‘TF?’ To what end this dead-tree blogroll? Is this a sincere attempt to explain the blogging phenomenon-which some estimate is, in its current form, more than 15 years old to off-the-grid grandmas across America? Or is this compilation a cynical ploy to cash in on free content?”

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    JOBS

  • The McLaughlin Group is looking for a Television Producer-Writer.

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors is looking for a Financial Services Reporter.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Web Producer and a Web Editor.

  • Summit Business Media is looking for a DC Reporter for Credit Union Times Magazine.

  • BNA is looking for a Reporter.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Will Other Washingtonians Say “No” To “Imus”?

    MediaMatters has the comprehensive list of Imus guests for 2007, including such Washingtonians as Howard Fineman, Tim Russert, Andrea Mitchell, David Brooks, Mary Matalin, Bob Schieffer, Chris Matthews, Judy Woodruff, Jim Lehrer, Evan Thomas, Pat Buchanan, Chris Wallace, Paul Begala, Howard Kurtz, David Shuster, Thomas Friedman, George Stephanopoulos, Kelly O’Donnell, Jim Miklaszewski, Stuart Taylor Jr., David Gregory and Anne Hull.

    Ana Marie Cox
    has said no mas to Imus. Will anyone else? And, more importantly, should they?

    Taking Out The Trash, 03.16.07

  • Valerie Plame on Capitol Hill today.

  • More Money, Less Booty For BET

  • An NBC release announced that “Meet the Press with Tim Russert” won the week ending Sunday, March 11, 2007 in all categories both nationally and in Washington, D.C. The show attracted 3.599 million total viewers, a 28% advantage over “Face the Nation”, a 31% lead over “This Week” and 159% more than “News Sunday”.

  • TNR also had a story recently on the Comedy Central/Rahm Emanuel story.

  • CJR’s Paul McLeary outlines, “How TalkingPointsMemo Beat the Big Boys on the U.S. Attorney Story.”

  • E&P reports that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed’s confession that he killed former Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, “brought back powerful memories of Pearl’s horrific death” for Paul Steiger, the Wall Street Journal’s managing editor.

  • American Journalism Review senior contributing writer Lori Robertson spoke with Dana Priest and Anne Hull about their Walter Reed series.

  • Priest discussed the story yesterday in a WashingtonPost.com chat.

  • Eric Alterman looks at why the Bush administration’s firing of eight federal prosecutors won’t just go away.

  • Meanwhile, Powerline doesn’t think it is a story, or rather a scandal, at all.

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