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Posts Tagged ‘Bill Kristol’

Anonymous Tipster Charges ‘Drivel’

This remark from an anonymous reader rolled in over the long weekend. He or she is referring to our recent item on an upcoming appearance by HuffPost Editor Arianna Huffington and The Weekly Standard‘s Editor Bill Kristol at Vanderbilt.

“Being middle class I can’t afford the airfare to Nashville for this great ‘gabfest’ featuring Kristol and Huffington…and it’s probably not worth the 10 bucks either.  Why run such drivel???”

Note to readers: We didn’t give this anonymous reader our AnonymASS Tipster of the Week award as we’re not jumping on a plane for Nashville either. So point taken. We can only hope and pray for a podcast.

Huffington, Kristol to Talk Media and Middle Class

On Wednesday March 23 at 7 p.m., HuffPost editor-in-chief Arianna Huffington will join The Weekly Standard’s Editor Bill Kristol for a discussion titled “How Does the Media Speak to the Middle Class.” They’ll also sign books at the Vanderbilt University bookstore starting at 4 p.m.

The discussion is part of Vanderbilt University’s Impact Symposium, and will follow a discussion the night before with former Minn. Gov. Tim Pawlenty and Christina Romer, the former chair of President Obama‘s Council of Economic Advisers.

Both discussions, which will last between an hour and 90 minutes, will be moderated by Politico‘s Ben Smith.

Tickets are on sale at Ticketmaster for $10, but don’t worry if you can’t make it to Tennessee. The conversation will be posted on Vanderbilt University’s website following the symposium.

Presumed Gloatfest for Conservative Journos

The Weekly Standard and Washington Examiner are scheduled to hold a post-election panel in which political editors and writers will analyze midterm election results and the new political landscape.

Event organizers are presuming that come election day Republicans will take control of the House. The release states, “the Washington Examiner’s senior political and congressional reporters, along with The Weekly Standard’s Fred Barnes will analyze the 2010 election results and look ahead to how President Obama will deal with a likely Republican-controlled House, what Tea Party candidates will do in Congress, and how the results will shape the GOP presidential field for 2012.”

The Panel

Bill Kristol (moderator), Editor, The Weekly Standard
Michael Barone, Senior Political Analyst, Washington Examiner
Byron York, Chief Political Columnist, Washington Examiner
Susan Ferrechio, Chief Congressional Correspondent, Washington Examiner
Fred Barnes, Executive Editor, The Weekly Standard

When/Where

Friday, Nov. 5 at 11:30 a.m. at the National Press Club, 529, 14th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20045

More information: Contact Dan Wilson at dwilson@sbpublicaffairs.com.


Rep. Grayson and The Weekly Standard’s Continetti in a Perplexing Display of Sparring

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The Weekly Standard’s Associate Editor Matthew Continetti appeared on HBO’s “Real Time With Bill Maher” on the show this past weekend. On the panel was the ever outspoken Rep. Alan Grayson (D-Fla.), who wore a signature ugly American flag tie. Maher mistakenly called Continetti “Editor” of the magazine. That would be Bill Kristol.

Continetti offered Grayson sideway glances that showed increasing irritation with the lawmaker’s comments. At one point, Grayson began talking about the “exclusive” people in this country — you know, the ones who aren’t inclusive?

Continetti piped up and disagreed (we think): “I think there are fewer exclusive people than they’re are inclusive,” he said.
Maher, looking perplexed, asked, “Wait, fewer?”
Continetti reworded: “I think the majority of most Americans are inclusive, are tolerant.”

The associate editor went on to say that President Obama, during his presidential campaign, successfully projected inclusiveness. “And that’s something the GOP needs to work on,” Continetti opined.

FishbowlDC Interview With NPR’s Mara Liasson

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mliasson.jpg Say hello to NPR’s Mara Liasson. She’s also a FNC contributor and appears regularly on “Fox News Sunday”, where she sits on the weekly roundtable and spars with FNC’s Brit Hume and The Weekly Standard‘s Bill Kristol. She often sides with NPR’s Juan Williams.

If you were a carbonated beverage which would you be? Seltzer.

How often do you Google yourself? Once. That was enough!

Who is your favorite working journalist? Robert Siegel, host of NPR’s “All Things Considered.”

What’s the worst thing you’ve ever said to an editor (or vice versa)? You can’t fire me-I quit! (just kidding)

Do you have a favorite word? auschkaflipped

Who would you rather have dinner with – First Lady Michelle Obama or Bestselling Author and former V.P. candidate Sarah Palin? Michelle Obama.

What word do you routinely misspell? Recommend.

What’s the name of your cell phone ring? Old fashioned phone.

What swear word do you use most often? No comment.

What word or phrase do you overuse? “Heave the health care bill over the finish line” … but hopefully I will never have to say that again.

What TV show do you have to watch? None.

Where do you shop most often for your clothes? Online.

Who do you prefer for daytime talk, Dr. Phil, Oprah, Tyra or the women of The View? I clearly am a cultural ignoramus. I’ve never watched a whole show of any of them.

Pick one: Leno, Letterman or Conan? Letterman.

If you were trapped on a deserted island, which public official would you want to be trapped with and why? President Obama. He’d get us rescued fast.

Who has been your mentor? Cokie Roberts.

What’s the best advice you ever received in the course of your career? From Cokie-keep your eye on the horizon-think long term.

What and where was your first job in journalism? Reporter for the Vineyard Gazette on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts.

Read more on Liasson after the jump to find out about her embarrassing bout of seasickness…

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Schieffer Brings Journo Friends to Fort Worth for Annual Symposium

If you’re lucky enough to ever have a conversation with Bob Schieffer, chances are he can’t go two or three minutes without mentioning Fort Worth, TCU or the Bullfrogs.

Well it was all TCU for Schieffer this week. The venerable “Face the Nation” anchor was back in his hometown of Fort Worth for the annual “Schieffer Symposium” at Texas Christian University’s School of Journalism, aptly named the Schieffer School of Journalism.

Bob was joined by some of the industry’s best- NBC’s Ann Curry, NYT‘s Maureen Dowd, Michael Eisner and the Weekly Standard‘s Bill Kristol- for a conversation on the state of journalism.

Of course, Schieffer’s old paper, the Fort Worth Star Telegram, was there to cover it. Check out some of their report after the jump…

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Labash Blowout Book Party: Marion Barry Has Arrived!

IMG_0217.jpgThe Weekly Standard/Daily Caller Matt Labash’s book, Fly Fishing With Darth Vader: And Other Adventures With Evangelical Wrestlers, Political Hitmen, And Jewish Cowboys came to life Thursday night as characters from his anthology filed in one by one to the beautiful home of Daily Caller Editor-in-Chief Tucker Carlson and his wife, Susie. The evening was one of fun, frolic and, of course, drinking, as the Distilled Spirits Council sponsored the party with a well-stocked Scotch-filled bar.

Characters from the book who showed up to the festivities included Democratic political strategist and former campaign aide to Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.) David “Mudcat” Saunders, Vanity Fair’s Christopher Hitchens and GOP consultant Roger Stone, who famously taught Labash how to properly tie a tie (he claims Labash still needs help). Stone (in photograph above with Labash) explained that he was leaving later to catch a train to Manhattan – his policy is to never stay overnight in D.C. as the town is too awful a place to remain too long. “I hate it,” he said. “People are phony.” (Stone splits his time between New York City and Miami.)

Soon the party turned into a roast.

“Nice house, not waspy enough,” Stone cracked. “I appreciate the enormous role I have played in making Matt Labash.” Stone joked that people always ask of Labash: ‘What’s with all the Hitler memorabilia?’

Saunders, to whom Labash devoted an entire chapter, said the author was much more than a writer but a life confidant whom he still phones for advice. “He knows enough about me to get me arrested,” he said. Initially, Saunders said, he feared a story about him appearing in The Weekly Standard: “I’m a Democrat. The Weekly Standard ain’t a damn Democrat publication.”

The party was the scene of scenes for D.C. journalists. Faces in the crowd included conservative radio personality Laura Ingraham, The Weekly Standard’s Stephen Hayes and Andy Ferguson, Politico’s Anne Schroeder Mullins, Patrick Gavin, Kiki Ryan, Michael Calderone and Pia Catton. Politico’s Jonathan Martin and NBC “Meet the Press” Executive Producer Betsy Fischer arrived simultaneously. The Daily Caller was represented well with opinion editor Moira Bagley, publisher Neil Patel, V.P. of sales Alex Treadway and congressional reporter Gautham Nagesh as well as Sean “Jim Treacher” Medlock on crutches. Others in attendance: The Hill’s A.B. Stoddard, the New York Post’s Charlie Hurt, Reason’s Michael Moynihan, Edelman’s Exec. V.P. Tony Blankley, National Review’s Jonah Goldberg, D.C. media consultant David Bass, former Time scribe Tim Burger and Slate’s Editor David Plotz. The Atlantic’s Josh Green was there and spoke of the story he has been living as of late – that of Rep. Eric Massa (D-N.Y.) and the old Navy buddies who told him, among other sordid details, about the ex-congressman’s infamous Massa massage and now compelling “snorkeling”. Green joked, “I feel dirty talking about it.” More seriously, he called Massa the “Andy Dick of Congress.”

Lightening struck when former D.C. Mayor Marion Barry arrived. Late and decked out in a suit and cherry-colored tie, Barry stole the show. And for a good while, it was all guests could do but stare and snap cell phone pictures.

“It took me an hour to find this place,” Barry told the awed crowd, explaining his tardiness. “I wandered here and there and everywhere.”

Initially Labash had no idea that Barry that arrived. “No, no, I don’t publicly speak!” the author was imploring guests, unaware that his most striking character was about to weigh in.

Carlson explained to guests that The Weekly Standard Editor Bill Kristol was sorry he couldn’t attend – he was in Manhattan hanging out with former N.Y. Gov. Eliot Spitzer and Massa (everyone laughed). Carlson read a note from Kristol that said, in part, “When we hired Labash, we had hoped he’d become a star – we’re still hoping.”

Carlson, who wrote the introduction to Labash’s book, had solemn praise for Labash with a twist. “Matt doesn’t simply write about people,” said Carlson. “He takes them as lifelong friends – almost in a proctological way.” He said when subjects first read the stories Labash has written about them their first response is “horror.”

Then they realize that what Labash has written is true, that the author has maybe captured them more deeply than anyone ever has.

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More party pictures after the jump…

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Sunday Show Preview: 02.28.10

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NBC’s Meet the Press: Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), WH Director of Health Reform Nancy-Ann DeParle, Rep. Eric Cantor (R-VA), President and CEO of National Urban League Marc Morial, BBC’s Katy Kay and Atlantic Media’s Ron Brownstein.

CBS’ Face the Nation: Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD), Sen. Kent Conrad (D-ND), Sen. Tom Coburn (R-OK), Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN), Politico’s Jim Vandehei

ABC’s This Week: Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN), NYT’s Paul Krugman, ABC’s George Will, Sam Donaldson and Cokie Roberts.

CNN’s State of the Union (with Candy Crowley now): Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY).

Fox News’ Fox News Sunday: Sen. Jon Kyl (R-AZ), Sen. Robert Menendez (D-NJ), Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI), Dale Earnhardt Jr. and a panel with Weekly Standard’s Bill Kristol, NPR’s Mara Liasson, Liz Cheney and NPR’s Juan Williams.

CNN’s Reliable Sources with Howard Kurtz: WaPo’s Dana Milbank, David Frum of FrumForum.com, The Nation’s Katrina Van Heuvel, ABC News’ Brian Ross, Fred Francis.

Washington Week with Gwen Ifill and National Journal: John Dickerson of SLATE Magazine and CBS News, TIME’s Karen Tumulty, WSJ’s Naftali Bendavid, David Shepardson of The Detroit News

CNN’s GPS with Fareed Zakaria: The Soros Foundation’s George Soros, Columbia University’s Simon Schama, FT’s Lionel Barber

NBC’s The Chris Matthews Show: NBC News Capitol Hill Correspondent Kelly O’Donnell, Washington Post Columnist David Ignatius, TIME Assistant Managing Editor Michael Duffy, Washington Post Columnist Kathleen Parker

Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Sen. Chris Dodd (D-CT), Bloomberg’s Mike Firn, Lizzie O’Leary, Julianna Goldman, Margaret Carlson and Kate O’Beirne.

CNN’s Amanpour: Ehud Barak, Israeli Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense

C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Sunday at 10:00 AM / 6:00 PM
This week’s guest is George Miller (D-Calif.). Guest reporters are Perry Bacon of WaPo & Steven Dennis of Roll Call.

We’ll update as we get ‘em.

Esquire Rips Kristol (Semi-Jokingingly We Think…)

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Esquire’s Mark Warren interviews The Weekly Stanard’s/Daily Caller’s Matt Labash in a must-read interview as it nastily rips apart everyone from author Labash to his boss, Bill Kristol to Politico, which Warren says brings on his narcolepsy. (“ZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzZZZZ”, he writes.)

Labash’s Fly Fishing with Darth Vader was released today.

A sampling:

Warren: Does Kristol realize you work for him? And what are you doing in Washington? Every writer there except you sucks hard.

ML: First off, I don’t know which of your pets Bill Kristol ran over, but if you like me, you like Kristol, because he’s one of the few editors in America who’d let me do what I do. That said, no, Kristol actually has no idea I work for him. I introduced myself once around ’95, but I don’t think he caught the name. I just kept showing up to editorial meetings, so he started calling me “David Brooks.” I played through, and have kept doing so. Which is odd, as now he tells me that he loves my column in the New York Times. I don’t know what he’s going to do when they hide my/Brooks’s column behind the pay wall. It’s not fair to him. It’s not fair to anyone.

Read more here.

Matt Labash Unplugged: On Deer Turds, Journalism, Trump’s Hair and Dick Cheney

Fly Fishing with Darth Vader Cover.jpg Today is the debut of The Weekly Standard’s/Daily Caller’s Matt Labash’s first book, Fly Fishing With Darth Vader – And Other Adventures With Evangelical Wrestlers, Political Hitmen, and Jewish Cowboys [Simon & Schuster]. His philosophy on reporting: “The best details always come when you think you already know everything.”

1. If this book were to become a film whom would you want to play you? Daniel Schorr. Because he’s 93, which I think is an accurate reflection of my old soul. If we can’t get him, then Nick Jonas, because the book could easily be re-imagined as a teen musical.

2. Where is your favorite place to write? Due to stacks of books and misplaced files, my home office is basically a dump/archaeological dig. I can’t even get into it without a Hazmat suit. So I no longer write there. I basically find some squatters corner in my house – most often the dining room table. But I might write anywhere that I can find quiet. Though it’s hard to find quiet. Especially with the voices. Who said that?

3. Have you ever gotten stereotypical writer’s block? That’s such a terrifying question, that it could jinx me to even answer it. So I won’t.

4. In writing the Detroit chapter you say, ‘It’s the only time I’ve ever felt like I was going to physically expire while writing a piece.’ Elaborate, please. Did you think you were having a heart attack? Also, you once ended up in the emergency room. Elaborate on that one, too. Actually, I had a writing-induced trip to the emergency room another time. I did a New Orleans trilogy during and after Katrina, over the course of a year and a half. The second installment came after spending a week in New Orleans during Mardi Gras. Tough assignment, I know. But I was keeping very late nights and really trying to drill down on the wreckage and misfortune of friends of mine who live there, cutting across all strata of the city. I cared a lot about the piece. Maybe a little too much. About once every year or two, when I’m real fatigued, and my resistance is down – which usually happens when I’m coming off the road – I get this lip edema, some type of allergic swelling that’s triggered by stress. About half your lip grows to the size of a pregnant nightcrawler. Pop a few Benadryl and it goes down. This time, however, it didn’t go down. It just kept growing. I looked like one of those Amazon tribesmen with a plate in their lip. It was troubling, though my kids thought it was hilarious. I was on deadline, but I had to go to the emergency room before my throat started closing up. So while there, I had to keep knocking out interview tape on the laptop while laying on a gurney, or I’d never get done in time. (More on stress after the jump…)

5.How did Donald Trump get reporters like you to agree to go off record for the rest of the luxury flight? In the end, did you like him? What was his hair like up close? His hair is not to be believed. It has to be real. Nobody would buy a rug that bad. Up close, it looks like an abandoned bird’s nest. Or maybe apricot-flavored cotton candy. (More on Trump after the jump…)

6. Your new Daily Caller boss, Tucker Carlson, writes that former subjects still seek your advice. Is journalism a form of psychotherapy? Have you had a subject cry mid-interview and how do you deal with it? Oh, hell yes. Journalism is definitely like psychotherapy. When you successfully get into a subject’s head, you’re their priest, their best friend, their spouse, their bartender, their shrink. They end up telling you, a stranger, things they often don’t tell the people they know best. And you know why? Because you asked (More on journalism as psychotherapy after the jump…)

7. What, if anything, surprised you in the writing of this book? Hard to say, because I get surprised by something almost every story. In fact, I live for those surprises. That’s the best part. If I had to pick one, though, it’s probably that Mudcat is a woman trapped inside a man’s body. He didn’t say that, or anything. But he didn’t have to.

8. One gets the sense reading your book that each word is vigilantly chosen. Tell us about your writing process – do you ever throw out what you’ve done and start over? Do you ever think, ‘Damn, that is good.’? I don’t do drafts. I edit as I go along. So I’m always throwing stuff out. And then when I finish, I read and read and re-read. I do so at the computer about 10 or 15 times, all the way through, hammering things out here and there. Then when I have it pretty close, I print it out, and I read and read and read some more, while I pace. Because walking helps, for some reason. We live in our own heads too much. It’s good to make writing as physical as possible. Sometimes I read out loud, not because I need to sound out big thesaurus words, but because it’s easier to tell if you’re missing a beat or have an extra beat too many. Writing and music – same difference. It’s all about rhythm. And I look like an idiot doing this, quite frankly. During the Iraq War, I roomed with my colleague Steve Hayes, who couldn’t get enough of this process. He told everybody back home that ‘Labash loves to walk around the house reading his own stuff.’ That’s why I don’t speak to Hayes anymore.

9.You profess to despise Facebook and Twitter. You say the tweeters “can tweet until their tweeters fall off” – do you still have accounts in either? Is any of it good or is it all sh-t? Such naughty language, Betsy. Is that how the kids talk in their social networkings? You ask if I still have an account? That would suggest I ever did. The answer is no on both counts. And I’m not getting one, either. Almost all of my friends and colleagues are on both, of course, which doubles my resolve not to join them. My goal is to serve as a totem of their shame. (More on Facebook and Twitter after the jump…)

10. What’s next for Matt Labash? Lunch, I suppose. I try not to think too far ahead.

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