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Posts Tagged ‘Carl Bernstein’

Morning Reading List, 11.21.08

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Good morning Washington. What DC restaurant is featured above? Think you know? Then email us with your guess.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 07.31.08

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Good Morning Washington. Above, FishbowlDC’s “Word Cloud,” courtesy of World.net.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Bernstein Becomes a CNN Analyst

From the release:

    Award-winning journalist and best-selling author Carl Bernstein, best known for his reporting work with Bob Woodward about the Watergate scandal, will join CNN this election season as an analyst, it was announced today by Jon Klein, president of CNN/U.S. He will appear on the full line-up of CNN’s broadcasts and election coverage.

Morning Reading List, 10.08.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • This is a close one, but you would rather marry a hot poor person over an ugly millionaire.

  • “Lynn Cheney Profiled by CBS Reporter Whose Husband is Her Literary Rep

  • It was one year ago last week that R.W. Apple passed away.

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, September 30 in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.”

  • We reported that Brian Dufffy left USNews. As of October 1, Duffy joined join NPR News as Managing Editor.

  • A look at Washington’s Onion office.

  • O’Reilly Lets Loose: Says WH Reporters Need To Be ‘Wiped Out,’ Calls CNN ‘The Pagan Throne’

  • More changes, Radio One to pull the plug on Syndication One

  • Pepsi, erectile dysfunction and ‘MTP?’

  • Ouch. O’Reilly on Scarborough: “Nobody watches Scarborough. He’s like a test pattern.”

  • Robert Novak, Washington Post Chairman Donald Graham, and other jurors and judges give their perspectives on jury duty, October 18, 6 p.m. at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1313 New York Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. This public forum is produced by Council for Court Excellence.”

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is continuing its series with Presidential candidates. Last week, Dennis Kucinich was featured. Coming up this week, Mike Huckabee, Ron Paul and John McCain.

  • The Congressional Black Caucus Political Education and Leadership Institute (CBC Institute) announced that “a date has been set for a Democratic presidential debate in Myrtle Beach, SC. The debate will be held on the evening of January 17, 2008 and will be produced and broadcast by CNN.”

  • In a release, the American Civil Liberties Union “applauded the Senate Judiciary Committee’s passage of S. 2035, a bill that would give stronger legal protection to journalists and their sources by lessening the chance that they will be arrested or intimidated for their reporting, particularly when using government sources. The legislation shifts authority from the Department of Justice to the federal courts to decide when journalists must disclose information to the government.”

  • Press Gazzette reports, “AOL UK is planning to outsource some editorial operations to India as part of cutbacks that could halve the number of editorial staff at the web portal’s London newsroom, according to insiders.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The National Association of Broadcasters, seeking to prevent legislation requiring payment of new music royalties by radio stations, asked Congress to investigate the relationship between artists and labels.”

  • Media Week reports, “U.S.News & World Report has launched a new companion Web site that leverages the magazine’s America’s Best franchise. The new site, RankingsandReviews.com, is geared for consumers looking for information prior to making major purchase decisions, such as buying a new car or a digital camera.”

  • AP reports, “Luring new readers means connecting with them on the Internet through blogs, live online chats and interactive databases, industry leaders told newspapers editors Thursday.”

  • E&P reports, “Even as the Olympics pushes ad spending worldwide next year, newspapers’ share of the global advertising market by 2009 will decline to 26.2% from 29.0% in 2006, according to a study released Thursday by the international ad agency ZenithOptimedia.”
  • Mediabistro got NPR’s Adam Davidsonto describe the behind-the-scenes challenges and rewards of chasing international stories for radio.”

  • Mediabistro also spoke to Ken Sunshine’s “about how he’s forged his business by fusing celebrity representation with political interests, and why he doesn’t shy away from tangling with the tabloids.”

  • Where does your favorite pub fall in the Newsprism?

  • Variety reports,Don Imus’ long-rumored return to the radio dial seems to be quickly coming to fruition. The impending deal appears to rule out any potential move to satellite radio. Sirius Satellite Radio chief Mel Karmazin indicated over the summer that he, too, would be interested in doing a deal with Imus.”

  • FT.com reports, “Peter Chernin has been Rupert Murdoch’s right-hand man for more than a decade. … In a video interview with FT.com, Mr Chernin talks about the threat from Facebook, News Corp’s $5bn acquisition of Dow Jones and its Wall Street Journal newspaper and the outlook for the US economy.” For highlights, click here.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. shares will reach $700 by the end of next year as the company lures more users to its YouTube video site and companies shift advertising spending to the Web, Bear Stearns & Co. said.”

  • Mediabistro turns 10!

  • Ken Paulson, editor of USA TODAY, has been named a Fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists; “this is the highest honor SPJ bestows upon a journalist for extraordinary contributions to the profession. Also named are Carl Bernstein, Muriel Dobbin, and John Markoff.”

  • Public Eye reports, “Okay, first things first: This space is going to be a ‘cackle’-free zone. No poking fun at irrelevant personal characteristics or foibles. At least not this week. That’s why this writer didn’t pick up on the ‘Chucklegate’ story yesterday, which referenced ‘The Daily Show’ and Jon Stewart. I’m just not going there.”

  • The AP reports, “Five journalists who covered the most tumultuous of 20th Century times are being honored by the Postal Service. These distinguished journalists risked their lives to report the events that shaped the modern world,” said Postmaster General Jack Potter, who announced the stamp series at the Associated Press Managing Editors Meeting in Washington Friday. The stamps are due out next year”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The Cleveland Plain Dealer is bemused — and frustrated — that presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich seems to be freezing out his own hometown newspaper.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “what’s amazing is how little effect the original O.J. story and its spawn — Anna Nicole Smith being the latest — have had on the serious business of serious news.”

  • RTNDA reports, “The young journalists are bringing a great deal of skill to the newsroom but often give the impression they think a diploma proves they’ve learned all they need to know about the craft.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Today’s Hardball news had us wondering about the show’s EP-less status. Sources tell TVNewser the search continues with a candidate identified, but no announcement is imminent.”
  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “‘The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers’ was Thomas Jefferson’s motto. Drew Curtis shares the sentiment to the extreme in his splenetic takedown of the press, It’s Not News, It’s Fark: How Mass Media Tries To Pass Off Crap As News, which came out late last spring.”

  • Public Eye reports, “You ever have a conversation where you thought afterwards, ‘I wish that had gone a bit better.’ Maybe after a date, or a job interview? According to Matt Elzweig’s new piece for the New York Press, New York Times Magazine writer Deborah Solomon has had that thought. And she decided — on at least two occasions — to change her weekly Q-and-A to be the conversation she wished she’d had.”

  • USA Today reports, “As channel choices and technological options have expanded, fewer of us are watching the same shows at the same time on the same day. And it’s increasingly affecting the national conversation.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc would be worth far more to shareholders if it broke up its Internet businesses or embarked on a major overhaul, including a departure from Web search, but management is unlikely to do either, according to an analyst note issued on Friday.”

  • Chris Matthewstalks about his fascination with politics and his trademark style of rapid-fire questioning” on NPR.

  • ABC News presents a new slideshow: Politicians Behind Bars.

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. online advertising spending topped $5 billion in the second quarter, a record for a three- month period, signaling that more advertisers are abandoning newspapers and television.”

    Jobs

  • Washington Life Magazine is looking for an Executive Assistant.

  • Cambridge University Press is looking for a Trade Sales Representative.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Director of Operations

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a part time News Assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • NYPost: Matthews an “Immoderate Moderator”

    Over the weekend, the NY Post’s editorial page took “Hardball” host Chris Matthews to task, writing:

      Now, “Hardball” is an opinion show, and Matthews is certainly entitled to his opinions – however offensively he chooses to express them.

      But why should any Republican candidate expect fairness from Matthews now?

      More to the point, why should potential voters expect Matthews to treat the candidates’ views fairly?

      By engaging in this sort of intemperate rhetoric, Matthews has effectively disqualified himself as an “honest broker” for this coming debate.

      NBC needs to replace him as a debate moderator immediately. The job – by definition – requires an attempt to display objectivity going into an event.

    CNBC’s Larry Kudlow, who will host the post-debate show, called Matthews remarks “stupid” and said that he would “rap him very, very hard” if he wasn’t on “his best behavior” during Tuesday’s GOP debate in Michigan.

    Fox News continued to stay on the story, bringing it up over the weekend, and even this morning. Carl Bernstein appeared on Fox on Saturday, but defended Matthews.

    Wilshire & Washington also writes up the party here.

    Also, why isn’t Matthews (and Maria Bartiromo) mentioned in the promos for tomorrow’s debate that appeared on yesterday’s “Meet the Press”? Best we can tell, promos for previous debates always include the moderator(s)…

    Morning Reading List, 09.19.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC’s ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ extended its run as the #1 evening newscast last week, winning among Total Viewers, Households, and Adults 25-54 for the nineteenth time in twenty-one weeks. The ABC broadcast averaged 7.70 million Total Viewers and a 1.9/8 among Adults 25-54, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 380,000 Total Viewers and 20,000 key demo viewers.”

  • The Washington Blogger Meetup has a Meetup tonight! To RSVP and see who else is going, click here.

  • Congrats to Washington Examiner columnist La Shawn Barber for her “Daily Show” appearance last night.

  • Broadcasters Urge FCC to Reject Digital Transition Mandates

  • AP reports, “If you’re not plugged into the Internet, you still have to buy the whole newspaper even if you only want to do the crossword puzzle. But online, that and other stand-alone features are increasingly popping up all over the Web.”

  • Matthew Felling will finish out the rest of the week on MSNBC’s
    “Morning Joe.”

  • Blitzer, Matthews try to woo Ellen

  • Murdoch’s Choice: Paid or Free for WSJ.com?

  • Roger and Me: Some CNBC Staffers Are Pining for Ailes

  • FCC Draws Fire for Emmys Bleeping

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp., the media company controlled by Rupert Murdoch, expects to save $100 million after its acquisition of Dow Jones & Co. and might scrap the fee for reading the Wall Street Journal’s Web site.”

  • For Time Warner, a time to break up?”

  • AOL takes on The Big Apple. CNet News.com reports, “770 Broadway is in a notably ambiguous location, to the point where AOL could really stake a claim to one of a handful of Manhattan locations depending on how it wants its new “advertising, not access” incarnation to be branded.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The Emmy telecast on Fox attracted 13.1 million viewers, the fewest since 1990, as the television industry’s annual awards show faced competition from football, baseball and reality programs.”

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media reports, “You heard it here first, folks: The New York Times is indeed putting paid to its paid-content program, TimesSelect.” Content Bridges reports, “So the New York Times’ decision to eliminate Times Select tonight at midnight leaves its emerging online business in a more precarious state — in that one-legged balancing position that any yoga newbie knows is a tough position to maintain.”

  • “CBS White House correspondent Jim Axelrod — you might remember him as the fellow labeled ‘defeatist’ by then-White House press secretary Tony Snow — was involved in another tense exchange last week, this time with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi.” Public Eye has the details.

  • Indiana Daily Student reports, “When Bob Woodward uncovered the first details of the Watergate scandal with Carl Bernstein in 1972, he worked against a government that clouded itself in secrecy and became infamous for hiding important information from the American people. Woodward believes the current administration is much the same.”

  • “Pictures of the Year International is beginning its 65th year as the world’s oldest and one of the most prestigious photojournalism competitions and collections. POYi has just scheduled dates for our 2007-08 program. An advance look at the categories and guidelines will be posted on this Web site at www.poyi.org in early December”

  • AScribe Newswire reports, “TechPresident.com, a data-rich, nonpartisan group blog that covers real-time, online activity of the 2008 presidential candidates — and chronicles online content from voters who will elect them, is this year’s $10,000 Grand Prize winner in the Knight-Batten Awards for Innovations in Journalism.”

  • New York Business reports, “The New York Times Book Review said Monday that it will redefine and expand its best seller lists starting with the Sept. 23rd issue.”

  • Bill Steigerwald writes, “Is Morton Kondracke a conservative op-ed columnist? Are David Broder, Cokie Roberts and Thomas Friedman centrists? That’s what Media Matters for America, the left-wing media watchdog outfit in Washington, would have you believe.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “New York Times Co., Lee Enterprises Inc. and McClatchy Co. fell to decade-long lows in New York Stock Exchange composite trading after Merrill Lynch & Co. cut its ratings on the three newspaper publishers to ‘sell.’”

  • Business 2.0 reports, “Newspaper ad sales are expected to decline 5 percent in 2007, so it’s no surprise that print publications are eager to squeeze more cash out of their Web sites. One obvious source: local advertising, which accounts for more than 80 percent of ad spending but less than 20 percent of Internet ad sales.”

  • “News Corp. said its $5.2 billion acquisition of Dow Jones & Co., a deal that will give Rupert Murdoch control of the Wall Street Journal, probably will close in about two months,” Bloomberg reports.

  • From CJR: “Our Score: Murdoch 2 — Journalism 0. No Ingrassia book, Varadarajan quits as readers learn to play Austrialian rules”

  • “Nielsen’s Adweek Media is launching a business networking site, At the Roundtable, for professionals in advertising, marketing and media.” Check it out here.

  • Portfolio reports, “Once in a while, Maureen Dowd is terrific. More often, she’s lazy, smug and shallow, trafficking in little but caricature and innuendo. Her most recent column, on Hillary Clinton’s perceived weakness on military issues, contains a prime example of Dowd at her worst.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “O.J. was back. O.J. was proclaiming his innocence. O.J. was doing the perp walk. The Juice was under arrest, and television was magically transported back to the mid-1990s, when all of America argued about every facet of the double-murder case. … ‘It’s the story that just doesn’t go away,’Fox News host Greta Van Susteren, who has interviewed Simpson several times, said by phone from Las Vegas.”

  • Peter Barnes, Jenna Lee, Nicole Petallides and Cody Willard are joining the FBN anchor team.” TVNewser has the details.

  • Also from TVNewser, “Weatherman Tony Perkins, a former GMAer, is now part of Washington, DC’s WTTG-TV/Fox 5 morning team.”

    Jobs

  • National Association of Manufacturers is looking for a Web Designer.

  • NHK Japan Broadcasting Corporation has an opening for Washington Producer position.

  • Fox News Channel is looking for an Associate Producer.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.14.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Most of you open up new web pages in a new tab, as opposed to a new window. And most of you are sorta geeky too.

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, September 9, 2007 in all categories.”

  • NBC also announced, “‘The Chris Matthews Show’ was the number-two
    rated Sunday morning public affairs show tying CBS’s ‘Face the Nation,’ and topping ABC’s ‘This Week’ and ‘FOX News Sunday’ in households nationally for the week ending September 9, 2007.”

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News Digital increased unique visitors 13% to 10.7 million in August 2007 versus the same time last year, and ranked in eighth place in the Top 20 of general news sites, according to the Nielsen NetRatings.”

  • Some shuffle at The Washington Times. A tipster tells us, “Assistant Metro Editor Ellen Sorokin and Metro investigative reporter Jim McElhatton have moved to National Desk. Robert Stacy McCain now reports to Times Internet Managing Editor David Eldridge.”

  • Brian Ross reports, “Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Microsoft founder Bill Gates and former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan have added their names to the list of people who say they were the subjects of fake interviews published in a French foreign affairs journal under the name of Alexis Debat, a former ABC News consultant.” TVNewser has more.

  • From E&P: “Top Execs Assess ‘USA Today’ Impact After 25 Years”

  • John Dickerson brings us “the best moments from the Democratic presidential mashup.”

  • Check out NxE’s list of the “Fifty Most Influential Bloggers

  • Washington Post’s Rob Pegoraro explores an interesting question: “Some coworkers and I were discussing The Future Of The Newspaper yesterday (a cheery topic–no, really), and one asked what sort of electronic device we might want to read ‘the paper’ on.”

  • CJR reports, “Unnamed sources have their way with — and say in –the NYT”

  • The Society of Professional Journalists announced that Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein “will be headlining a panel discussion at the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference in Washington, D.C. … The event will take place at 1:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW in the Ticonderoga room.”

  • Huffington Post reports, “Last night — at long last — Stephen Colbert brought the seemingly endless saga of WristGate to an end, tying together all open threads into one magical unbroken circle of love, like a cleanly-knitted bone. … Colbert shared the news (already reported on ETP) that his all-star signed cast had sold for $17,200 on eBay — with proceeds to the Yellow Ribbon Fund”

  • Bloomberg reports, “New York Times Co. and Clear Channel Communications Inc., the largest U.S. radio broadcaster, are among the most vulnerable media companies in the event of a U.S. recession, according to a report by Moody’s Corp.”

  • Brown University’s Justin Elliott explores, “Why college newsrooms are often neither diverse nor racially sensitive.”

  • “The editors of FOLIO: magazine announce the Finalists for the 2007 Eddie and Ozzie Awards for excellence in magazine editorial and design.” For the complete list, click here.

  • “The New York Times is looking to inform all the Web’s denizens, or at least guilt them into scanning RSS headlines. It’s launched a Facebook App dubbed The New York Times News Quiz. After a answering five questions based on the day’s headlines, takers are awarded a “Times IQ” and ranked against their friends and collective Facebook users. Brilliant move. Even cheaters will end up learning something. No one wants to look like an idiot in front of friends.”

  • TVNewser reports, “During a month of much-anticipated book releases, 60 Minutes keeps getting the high-profile authors. Alan Greenspan will be featured this Sunday. And, according to law.com, a Clarence Thomas interview will air September 30. Tony Mauro of Legal Times writes, ‘sources say that CBS correspondent Steve Kroft interviewed Thomas at the Court and elsewhere recently for the 60 Minutes segment.’”

  • EWeek reports, “Responding to customer demand, market researcher comScore Sept. 11 said it would start counting the audiences for blogging sites in what it is formally calling a Conversational Media Report. The report will tally the number of readers of blogs both popular and obscure, as well as some social networking sites.”

  • Forbes reports, “All the networks are scrambling to develop Web strategies. Even against this backdrop, the flurry of dealmaking at CBS stands out. Leading the charge has been former Silicon Valley venture capitalist Quincy Smith, named chief executive of CBS Interactive in November 2006.”

  • The AP reports, “the 62 percent of Americans who say that TV programs are getting worse, according to a poll by The Associated Press and AOL Television. Only 22 percent said they are getting better.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. advanced in Nasdaq Stock Market trading after a Cowen & Co. analyst said their proposed merger may get regulatory approval as soon as next month.”

    Jobs

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editorial Assistant, Arts and Features, NP

  • A full Service Advertising Agency in Washington DC is looking for a Graphic Designer/Art Director

  • Kiplinger Washington Editors is looking for Associate Editor, Kiplinger.com

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.28.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Permanent reporter’s notebook? Hmm… no. Most of you go for whatever’s around and available.

  • An ABC release announced that “World News with Charles Gibson” was “the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers” for the week of March 19-23. Averaging 8.35 million Total Viewers “World News” outperformed NBC’s “Nightly News” by 260,000 Total Viewers for the week. “This also marks the sixth time in seven weeks the ABC broadcast has ranked first among Households.”

  • An NBC release announced that “NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams” “outperformed ABC and CBS in the key demographic adults 25-54 during the week of March 19-23.” For the week, “Nightly News” delivered 2.447 million among adults 25-54, 1% more than ABC “World News” and 7% more than CBS “Evening News.”

  • E&P reports, “The percentage of minority journalists working in U.S .newsrooms decreased slightly to 13.62% this year from 13.87% a year ago, according to the American Society of Newspaper Editors’ annual survey, which included full-time online journalists for the first time.” ASNE has more.

  • Jay Rosen talks to Leonard Witt about his Newassignment.net’s first experimental project. And The Huffington Post is joining in on the fun.

  • Tonight, will pre-parties be the new post-party?

  • UMD’s Diamondback announced, “The governing board for the university’s independent student publications elected chief news editor Kevin Litten as The Diamondback’s next editor in chief during its monthly meeting.”

  • The PEJ News Coverage Index shows that the fall out over Alberto Gonzales was the biggest story for the week of March 18-23, 2007.

  • The News Observer looks into TNR’s Alex Heard‘s accusations of David Sedaris “flubberizing the truth for comic effect,” in an expose titled “This American Lie.”

  • The AP reports,Barack Obama has picked up the endorsement of Sheila C. Johnson, the ex-wife of media pioneer Robert Johnson, who is backing rival Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential bid.”

  • TNR announced the finalists in the Ira Glass contest. The winner will be announced today.

  • American Enterprise Institute is looking to fill two positions — a web editor and a director of book marketing.

  • TVNewser reportsChris Wallace ripped Keith Olbermann on the nationally syndicated Mike Gallagher Show Friday.” Nice.

  • A reader notes, “Isn’t there just a smidge of irony that Dobbs is speaking about the ‘War on the Middle Class’ at one of the most expensive universities in the country ($50,000/year if I’ve heard right)?”

  • Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein spoke at UT Austin last week on “The Legacy of Watergate: Why It Still Matters.”

  • E&P reports that Woodward and Bernstein’s Deep Throat notes went on public display Friday at the University of Texas at Austin.

  • Glen Greenwald questions the relationship between Drudge and the Politico “poisonously joined at the hip.”

  • Lost Remote reports that Verizon’s IPTV network FiOS “will take the wraps off a local TV channel called FiOS1 later this week in the D.C. area. It’s Verizon’s first ‘owned and operated TV channel in the country,’ and it will carry local news, weather, traffic and sports programming — including live college games.”

  • A tipster tells updates us on Chuck Babington: “You probably already know, but he’s leaving the Post to cover Congress for AP. No plans yet on a replacement, but Kim Hart is still editing and we expect Alan Sipress may step in.”

  • Carl Sessions Stepp looks at the contradiction of young journalists: “They value what papers do but find them often dull, out of touch and sluggish. They have passion for their craft but are positioning themselves for a future that may leave newspapers behind.”

  • YouTube announced the winners of its inaugural awards, “paying tribute to the wannabe stars who have used the site as a launching pad to fast fame.”

  • Carl Howe writes on “Why Print Journalism Will Never Really Die.”

  • WWD reports, “After more than a decade at Dennis Publishing, The Week publisher Carolyn Kremins is returning to Condé Nast as the vice president and publisher of Cookie.”

  • Variety reports that The Onion “is launching a video newscast dubbed Onion News Network, or ONN, a 24-hour fake news net marketing itself as, ‘faster, harder, scarier and all-knowing.’”

  • Check out the 2006 IRE Award Winners.

  • Raw Story Media is looking for a full-time correspondent.

  • Gannett News Service is seeking a Congressional Editor.

  • The Center for Public Integrity is hiring an editorial assistant for major investigative journalism project.

  • The Daily Progress is seeking a copy editor/page designer.

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