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Posts Tagged ‘Craig Newmark’

Craigslist Founder Joins Board of Center for Public Integrity

Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist.org, has joined the board of directors of the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit investigative news organization.

Newmark launched Craigslist in 1995. The site reaches far and wide — including the halls of Congress. Craigslist recently grabbed headlines in Washington when then-Rep. Chris Lee (R-N.Y.) flirted with Washington blogger Yesha Callahan, and sent her a shirtless photograph on Craigslist. She went off about it on FlyBlackChic.com, her personal blog.

In a release, CPI announced a “major” new initiative called “craigconnects.org,” a 20-year plan to connect and protect organizations (including the Center for Public Integrity) that are doing good worldwide via the Internet.

Mediabistro Course

Social Media 201

Social Media 201Starting October 13Social Media 201 picks up where Social Media 101 leaves off, to provide you with hands-on instruction for gaining likes, followers, retweets, favorites, pins, and engagement. Social media experts will teach you how to make social media marketing work for your bottom line and achieving your business goals. Register now!

Real Housewives to Show up to V.I.P. Reception

We’re told a few of the Real Housewives are going to be at the chocolate lounge Co Co. Sala Thursday night for a V.I.P. reception to amp everyone up for Tuesday’s FedTalks 2010 with guest speaker HuffPost Editor-in-Chief Arianna Huffington. Tuesday’s all-day event, hosted by Fedscoop at Sidney Harman Hall, will include speakers on topics such as media’s role in government, Congress and technology, Cybersecurity and more. Speakers include Wonkette founder Craig Newmark, Nasa CTO Chris Kemp and GQ’s Ana Marie Cox (we’ll see if she dresses in stand-out rocker chic as she did for the recent Politico-Google midterm election forum). Huffington is not attending the V.I.P. reception (and she isn’t expected to dress like a rocker for the Tuesday event). At least one of the housewives who said she’ll be at the chocolate lounge is Cat Ommanney along with Lynda Erkiletian‘s boyfriend, Ebong Eka (no word on whether Lynda is coming too). Other bigwigs expected to attend include David Dejewski from the Dept. of Defense and Fred Humphries, VP of Govt. Affairs for Microsoft. If that’s not enough of a draw for you (or if, in fact, the housewives are a deterrent), we hear  “they have SICK chocolate mojitos that are to die for.”

Want to attend FedTalks? Visit here.

Morning Reading List, 01.16.09

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 08.19.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 08.12.08

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Good morning, Washington.

Did you survive the GMail outage last night? Thank God we use Yahoo! Moving on: What journo is the father of the adorable baby shown above? Let us know.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 03.03.08

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Good morning Washington. One year ago we said goodbye to Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. and AP said hello (again) to Ron Fournier. It’s the birthday of Alexander Graham Bell, Jessica Biel and, yes, me, which is the closest I’ll ever get to the lovely Biel. And to answer your questions: 1.) No, I don’t feel older, 2.) I was sick of my 20s anyway and 3.) A flat screen tv would be great, thanks.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • You think Willie Geist is hotter than Joe Scarborough.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Times reports, “It’s a bad day for those assigned to cover the Redskins on a daily basis — the team has parted ways with Chris Helein, the media relations chief since the summer of 2006.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Killing Competition Breeds New-Style Foreign Correspondents

  • The latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press shows, Barack Obama is riding high as the March 4 primaries approach. Obama has moved out to a broad-based advantage over Hillary Clinton in the national Democratic primary contest and holds a 50%-43% lead over John McCain in a general election matchup.”

  • On the Press Bus, Some Questions Over Favoritism

  • Gannett Blog reports, “Batting three for three, The Arizona Republic appears to be protecting another top Gannett executive from embarrassing online reader comments. The paper published its story about newly appointed newspaper division President Robert Dickey (left) — without allowing comments at the story’s end. Dickey, 50, the Republic’ s chairman, replaces retiring Sue Clark-Johnson, 61 — another former Republic executive.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “At the San Jose Mercury News, reporters have been instructed to wait at home on the morning of March 7. If they don’t get a phone call by 10 a.m. telling them that they’ve lost their jobs, they should head to work.”

  • The Crimson reports,Linda J. Greenhouse ’68, the New York Times reporter and former Crimson editor who has covered the U.S. Supreme Court for 30 praise-filled years, will retire from her beat, the newspaper confirmed yesterday.”

  • From a reader: “Here’s another one on everyone’s fave new media honco, Zell: If you look at the AP’s board of directors’ history, they hardly ever eliminate a Trib/NYT/WaPo member from their board, so Zell’s a shoo-in. If you were Ken Lowe/Gary Pruitt, would YOU piss off this man and vote ‘no?’ Me neither. When he visited the DC buros, I hear he had Randy Michaels, the up & coming CEO, in tow the whole time…”

  • Peggy Noonan on William Buckley.

  • The AP reports, “The Boston Globe says it plans to cut 60 jobs by offering voluntary employee buyouts. Publisher P. Steven Ainsley is telling staff that the buyout packages are a difficult but necessary step to lower costs and keep the business healthy. The plan is part of a broader cost-cutting effort.”

  • William F. Buckley’s Greatest Hits

  • The AP reports, “The New York Times Co. said Friday its January revenue from continuing operations dropped 5.5 percent, weighed down by a significant classified ad sales decline. The company, whose properties include The Boston Globe, International Herald Tribune and its namesake daily, said revenue from continuing operations slipped to $272.3 million from $288 million in the prior-year period.”

  • Newsday.com reports, “Newsday publisher Tim Knight Thursday announced that the newspaper will be cutting about 120 jobs throughout the company, citing declining sales and the ‘soft advertising revenue environment.’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “McClatchy Co., the newspaper publisher that paid $4.1 billion for Knight Ridder Inc. in 2006, wrote down the value of its publications for the second time in four months.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Harbinger Capital Partners NY LLC and its affiliate Harbert Management Corp. on Friday filed a proxy with the Securities and Exchange Commission to elect four directors to New York Times Co.’s board at the 2008 annual meeting, scheduled for April 22″

  • Regarding The New York Times, Jay Rosen asks Romenesko readers, “What were the editors thinking?”

  • StuffWhitePeopleLike has The New York Times at #46. “Mornings are exceptionally important to white people, as witnessed by their love of breakfast places. However, some white people never go out for breakfast on a Sunday Morning. The reason? The Sunday edition of the New York Times.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “‘The Chris Matthews Show’ was the number-two rated Sunday morning public affairs show tying CBS’s ‘Face the Nation,’ and topping ABC’s ‘This Week’ and ‘FOX News Sunday’ in households nationally for the week ending February 24, 2008.”

  • The Washingtonian asks “Who’s Really The Best Political Team in Television?”

  • And NBC announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the top rated Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, February 24, 2008 in all categories.”

  • Griffin Compliments Countdown Demo Win

  • C-SPAN 2 & C-SPAN Radio will air the election results at 7:30 p.m., pending the Senate schedule.

  • A CNN release announced, “On the heels of CNN’s ratings win for the month of February and the network’s nine presidential primary debates, seven of which were among the most-watched in cable news history, CNN’s political team will report live from the CNN Election Center and across the country for the Tuesday, March 4 primaries. Voters in Texas, Ohio, Vermont and Rhode Island will cast their ballots and CNN journalists and analysts will be on-hand to report the results and what it means for the remaining presidential candidates.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox & Friends saw double digit gains year-to-year. The 7-9amET morning show is up 22% in Total Viewers, averaging 953,000 viewers this month. CNN’s American Morning is up 13% from last year, and is averaging 469,000 viewers.”

  • Poynter Online reports,Terry Gross, the Peabody Award-winning host of the NPR talk show Fresh Air, is a guest voice — as herself — on The Simpsons airing Sunday, March 2 on FOX. Actor Topher Grace also makes a guest voice appearance in the episode.”

  • TVNewser reported that Megyn Kelly got married this weekend. Sorry guys.

  • The Washington Post reports, “The recently resolved Hollywood writers’ strike took its toll on local ratings during the February sweeps period that ended Wednesday. Prime-time ratings declined last month compared with the same period in 2007 for nearly all Washington stations, which because of the strike aired more reruns and reality programming. The dip in prime-time viewership in turn affected ratings for some of the station’s late-night and early-morning newscasts.”

  • TVNewser reports,Liz Cox Barrett writes in the Columbia Journalism Review about an exchange on Morning Joe Wednesday morning with Pat Buchanan and Joe Scarborough. Buchanan and Scarborough were discussing Sen. Hillary Clinton and the difference between her speech pattern and that of Sen. Barack Obama.”

  • Power Line reports, “The Times Goes Looking for Media Bias … Not, as you might expect, in the mirror. Instead, the Times pointed its finger at a television station in the Republican South. This is a spin-off from the recent 60 Minutes story that apparently claimed it was Karl Rove’s fault that former Alabama Governor Don Siegelman was convicted of bribery and mail fraud. I haven’t followed that story closely, assuming that it is another 60 Minutes hoax.”

  • Jeff Greenfield: Sunday Nights Live

  • Media Money reports, “Time Warner’s new CEO Jeff Bewkes just showed Wall Street that he means business about cost cutting and getting the company on track. He just made his first big move: consolidating Time Warner’s New Line studio into its separate and larger Warner Bros.”

  • FreePress.net reports, “We just caught Comcast Corp. stacking an FCC hearing with paid (and apparently sleepy) seat-fillers. The hearing was set up to investigate Comcast’s recent blocking of the Internet. But Comcast packed the room so that the public couldn’t get in to voice their support for Net Neutrality.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS’ Bob Schieffer is this year’s recipient of the Leonard Zeidenberg First Amendment Award. It will be presented to him by PBS’ Jim Lehrer at the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation’s First Amendment Awards Dinner next week in Washington, D.C. CNN’s John Roberts will emcee the March 6 event. Other award presenters are to include ABC News President David Westin and NBC Universal CEO Jeff Zucker.”

  • TVNewser has a round-up of the ratings and reviews from MSNBC’s Tuesday’s Democratic debate.

  • Washingtonian presents, David Simon Chats About The Wire’s Final Weeks”

  • His Extreme-ness says, “If you base fictional politicians on real-life politicians, are you allowed to flip-flop on the issues — just like the real guys do? Apparently so if you’re David Simon, creator of the mega HBO hit ‘The Wire.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • It was Karl Frisch’s 30th birthday on Saturday.

  • A release announced, “New America Foundation’s Next Social Contract Initiative and Pollster Cliff Zukin released new findings on how public opinion shapes national values and informs the potential for policy reform, particularly in the areas of health care, education, taxes and economic security.” Check out the report entitled “The American Public and the Next Social Contract: Public Opinion and Political Culture in 2007″ here.

  • FaithfulAmerica.org, now operated by Faith in Public Life, sent a letter individually signed by 9,000 people of faith to the polling directors at the media organizations that sponsor the presidential primary exit polls. The letter asks ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox and the AP to stop stereotyping people of faith by asking all voters — Republicans and Democrats — the same religion questions on the exit poll surveys. We expressed particular concern that Republican voters in every state have been asked if they are evangelical, while Democrats have not been asked if they are evangelical in a single state. Signatures are still streaming in at FaithfulAmerica.org.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “In the convoluted saga of Microsoft Corp. bidding to gobble up Yahoo Inc., speculation about News Corp. emerging as the white knight to rescue the beleaguered Internet giant refuses to die.”

  • Post I.T. writes,Craig Newmark seems pretty content with his business, the hugely successful craigslist.org. He hasn’t accepted any outside funding, has declined offers to buy the site, and he doesn’t have any big plans to change its formats or features. So why was Newmark one of the keynote speakers this morning at the Southeast Venture Capital Conference in Tysons Corner? ‘I’m a curiosity,’ he said, sounding somewhat baffled by the attention he’s gotten since launching the site in 1995. The product hasn’t changed much. He still lists free classified ads from all over the world, charging only for job listings in 11 major markets and for apartment listings in New York City.”

  • NMA reports, “Hearst Digital Network, the online division of the National Magazine Company, is to close a host of its magazine websites. The move is part of a rationalisation of the network’s key brands that will see it reduce its focus from 13 titles down to five. The four magazine sites being closed include Good Housekeeping and Country Living, which will be wrapped into a single portal, Allaboutyou.com.”

  • Portfolio reports, “TechCrunch is the talk of Silicon Valley. Now the founder of the blog talks about the battle between Microsoft and Yahoo, Barry Diller, and why he says Gawker Media’s Nick Denton is ‘amoral.’”

  • ClickZ reports, “Yahoo has started testing behavioral and geo-targeting across its growing network of newspaper publisher sites. A preview of its nascent display ad management platform and recent statements from Yahoo execs indicate the firm’s sales restructuring, newspaper consortium project and network ambitions are aligning.”

  • Reuters reports, “Nearly 70 percent of Americans believe traditional journalism is out of touch, and nearly half are turning to the Internet to get their news, according to a new survey.”

  • A release announced, “DCist.com is pleased to announce its second annual DCist Exposed Photography Show, in partnership with Civilian Art Projects, running March 7-15, 2008. 44 local photographers, both amateur and professional, were chosen out of over 250 who submitted their work for the show through the DCist Flickr site. Every day DCist.com selects photos from a user-generated Flickr photo pool to use in its daily coverage of local news, arts and entertainment, politics, food and sports.”

  • Eric Boehlert writes, “The press will torment Obama, too”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar talks to George Carlin and finds out he “Reads More Blogs Than You Do”

  • Wonkette reports, “Important New York Times editorial decisions
    New Republic Investigates NY Times Newsroom Politics Over Single Article, Again”

  • “Two thirds of Americans — 67% — believe traditional journalism is out of touch with what Americans want from their news, a new We Media/Zogby Interactive poll shows.

  • Mark Glaser writes, “Distinction Between Bloggers, Journalists Blurring More Than Ever”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Ten years ago, he was a reclusive, pasty-faced 31-year-old who, bashing away on his laptop in his grungy Hollywood apartment, shot to prominence when he threatened to bring down Bill Clinton’s presidency by breaking news of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Now, Matt Drudge owns a luxurious Mediterranean-style stucco house on Rivo Alto Island in Florida’s Biscayne Bay, a condominium at the Four Seasons in Miami and is said to drive a black Mustang. He remains an elusive, mysterious figure but the internet pioneer is arguably the single most powerful journalist — though his detractors even deny that is his occupation — in the world.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Some say that the media have fallen hard for Barack Obama. Others note that journalists once carried a torch for John McCain and may well do so again. Watch the coverage closely, however, and it turns out that the most powerful media bias in this campaign is not for a person but for a decade.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Nation’s Richard Kim writes, “I won’t attempt a grand summary of the late William F. Buckley’s legacy. The man was undeniably one of the great political forces of the 20th century — so too were Ronald Reagan and Milton Friedman. But in seeking to capture the scope of his influence, writers on the left have taken to applauding Buckley’s ‘brilliance.’”

  • On Buckley, Slate’s Timothy Noah writes, “Why we should be (mostly) glad that he outlived his brand of conservatism.”

  • Slate’s Michael KinsleyOn Intellectual Honesty Bill Buckley had it, journalism should strive for it, and politics needs more of it.”

  • Yale Daily News reports, “William F. Buckley Jr. ’50, whose penchant for the pen beginning in his earliest years at Yale popularized the conservative movement and transformed a generation of American politics, died Wednesday at his home in Stamford, Conn. He was 82.”

  • DMNews.com reports, “In an effort to heighten brand awareness of its online and print magazine titles, Hearst Magazines Digital Media will participate in Yahoo Buzz. Yahoo Buzz allows readers to vote on the popularity of online stories. Yahoo then posts the winners on its homepage. Hearst has signed on ten of its titles, including Esquire, Cosmopolitan and Redbook, as Buzz content partners.”

  • The Progressive announced that they have added two new columnists: “Dave Zirin, who delves into the politics of sports, and Jim Hightower, the great—and funny—Texas populist.”

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    RADIO

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News journalists Larry Abramson and Marisa Penaloza have been honored by the Education Writers Association with its ‘National Award for Education Reporting’ in the radio category for a year-long NPR on-air and online series following a Baltimore-area high school’s efforts to improve student achievement.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “Conservative talker Laura Ingraham gave her a big break, and now former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright wants her own radio show. ‘I think it would be so much fun,’ she tells us. ‘I love talking, listening, and asking and responding to questions.’ Albright was recently on Ingraham’s show talking up Sen. Hillary Clinton when she felt the urge to have the mike to herself. ‘I like to be provocative and like to be provoked,’ she says. ‘Having been on many radio shows, I know they provide great opportunities to learn about many different subjects and allow you to have fun while doing it—all without having to put on makeup!’”

  • Radio Ink reports, “XM Satellite Radio CEO Nate Davis this morning detailed some cost-saving changes his company is making to its marketing strategy, and also revealed how he’s working with Apple to make XM programming more accessible to iPod users.”

  • Reuters reports, “XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc and Sirius Satellite Radio Inc have extended by two months a deadline to potentially terminate without penalty Sirius’s year-old proposed acquisition of its bigger rival.”

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    JOBS

  • Army Times Publishing Company is seeking Deputy News Editor for Navy Times and Navytimes.com.

  • Eurasia Group is seeking an Editor.

  • Liberty University is looking for a Promotional Copywriter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for an Assistant Documents Editor.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for an Editor.

  • MarketWatch is looking for a Financial Regulation & Housing Reporter.

  • The Humane Society of the United States is seeking an Associate Editor.

  • Carroll County Times is looking for a Features reporter.

  • Citigate Cunningham is looking for a Director of Technology Public Relations and an Account Manager for Technology Public Relations.

  • National Federation of Independent Business is looking for a Web Communications Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.23.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You are rooting for the Red Sox over the Rockies in the World Series. Go Sox!

  • The Onion News Network reports, “For a majority of likely voters, meaningless bullshit will be the most important factor in deciding who they will vote for in 2008.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “About the same time that Rupert Murdoch was telling shareholders that his beloved News Corp. had become the world’s most valuable media conglomerate, the company’s worth was in the midst of sinking by $1.53 billion. But Friday’s massive stock market sell-off didn’t alter Murdoch’s message. By the end of Friday trading, News Corp. sported a market capitalization of $67.79 billion, larger than Time Warner, the former biggest media company in the world.”

  • From Richard Prince: “Williams’ Thomas Interview Goes to Time, Not NPR

  • The Weekly Standard’s Nick Swezey wins on Jeopardy! Tune in tonight to see if he wins again.

  • News.au.com reports,Rupert Murdoch praised by Franciscan monk”

  • FishbowlNY reports, “What happens when two well-mannered journalists decide to have a war of words? You get the great Jeff Jarvis vs. Adam Nagourney e-mail war of ’07.”

  • A release announced, “The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) announced on Oct. 22 the latest class of seven Knight International Journalism Fellows. In keeping with the program’s commitment to selecting the best international journalists, the group includes the first Egyptian, Indonesian and African Fellows, as well as Fellows from Britain and the United States. They will address key societal issues through hands-on media projects in eight countries.” For more info, click here.

  • Variety reports, “Cables hang from open raceways overhead and parts of NBC’s 30 Rock headquarters don’t have air conditioning. But on Monday, NBC will complete the physical integration of NBC News with MSNBC, part of a multimillion renovation of the third and fourth floors of the 69-year-old art-deco gem.”

  • New York Times reports, “How many people visited Style.com, the online home of Vogue and W magazines, last month? Was it 421,000, or, more optimistically, 497,000? Or was the real number more than three times higher, perhaps 1.8 million? The answer — which may be any, or none, of the above — is a critical one for Condé Nast, which owns the site, and for companies like Ralph Lauren, which pay to advertise there. Condé Nast;s internal count (1.8 million) was much higher than the tally by ComScore (421,000) or Nielsen/NetRatings (497,000), whose numbers are used to help set advertising rates, and the discrepancies have created a good deal of friction.”

  • The Examiner reports, “Dan Patrick returns to Washington sports talk radio starting today and can be heard weekdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on SportsTalk 980 AM. Patrick will replace the popular local show hosted by FOX 5 Sports Director Dave Feldman and Comcast SportsNet’s Carol Maloney.”

  • TVNewser reports, “To Frank Sinatra’s New York, New York, Joe Scarborough welcomed viewers to MSNBC’s new Manhattan digs. Multiple cameras worked their way around the combined studio and assignment desk space showing off the 3rd floor facelift, which took just nine months to complete.”

  • Washington Post reports, “When AOL chief executive Randy Falco was the No. 2 at NBC for all those years, he liked to call himself ‘the conductor’: He made the trains run on time. He still makes the trains run in his new job. But for 750 AOL employees let go last week, the trains run one way only — straight out of the company’s Dulles campus.”

  • Mutlichannel.com reports, “Comcast is working up its own version of Time Warner Cable’s Start Over, which lets viewers play back certain TV programs if they’ve missed the beginning of a show without the need for a digital video recorder.”

  • Media Post reports, “One of the strange conventions of science fiction film and television shows has been the idea that in the future, we will all dress alike. From “Twilight Zone” reruns to movies like The Matrix, Aeon Flux, and I, Robot, citizens of the distant future seem, for no obvious reason, to have given up the idea of dressing themselves as individuals. In the future, fashion is apparently doomed.”

  • B&C reports, “Meredith and Comcast are pairing up for a family-focused video-on-demand suite to launch in December.”

  • FishbowlNY reports, “As you may have heard, we celebrated our 10th anniversary earlier this month by honoring 10 media movers and shakers from the past decade with Golden Boas awards. Among the recipients was FBNY frenemy Stephen Colbert, who, due to prior commitments such as campaigning for president and practicing his brow furrow, couldn’t make the award ceremony. No worries, we had a secret weapon. Before last night’s Colbert Report, Craig Newmark, our partner in mischief and Golden Boa winner, presented Mr. Colbert with his award, and boy did he look pleased. Well done Craig, well done.”

  • A release announed, “Carol Lin Reporting will mark Breast Cancer Awareness Month with a DarynKagan.com branded video series beginning on October 22. This special series will be available on the Carol Lin Reporting homepage, and will feature 10 hopeful and inspirational news stories about cancer survivors committed to creating change in the world through their journeys with cancer. This marks the very first time the two former CNN news anchors will collaborate on a project since each left CNN in 2006.”

  • Washingtonpost.com and Newsweek today launch the second series of “How the World Sees America,” “a multimedia diary covering international news. Washingtonpost.com reporter, Amar Bakshi is on the ground in Istanbul today talking with protesters about the deaths of seventeen Turkish soldiers by the Kurdistan Workers’ Party.” For more info, click here.

  • An American University release announced, “John Douglass, associate professor and director of the film and media arts division at American University’s School of Communication, received the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Washington D.C. chapter of the International Television Association (ITVA-DC) during the organization’s 2007 Peer Awards ceremony held Oct. 20 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.”

  • Baltimore Sun’s John McIntyre writes, “Copy editors have made a big mistake. For years, coming in to work, typically in the evening, after the Important People at the paper have gone for the day, editing through the night and producing, all things considered, a remarkably clean newspaper, they saw no reason to trumpet their achievements. The work, after all, the product, speaks for itself. Their misjudgment was thrown into high relief last week when Joseph Lodovic, the president of Dean Singleton’s MediaNews publishing concern, was quoted as saying, ‘We have to find ways to grow revenue or become more efficient by eliminating fixed costs. Why does every newspaper need copy editors? In this day and age, I think copy-editing can be done centrally for several newspapers.’”

  • CNN Money reports, “Last week could hardly have been grimmer for the newspaper industry. First off, Gannett and McClatchy — the two biggest newspapers publishers in the U.S., respectively — reported diminished revenues and profits. Meanwhile, following the lead of Belo, publisher of the Dallas Morning News, Scripps announced it was splitting its growing television and interactive businesses off from the company’s newspaper business so that investors could get excited about the company’s slumping stock price.”

  • Times Leader Editor and Publisher Richard L. Connor writes, “Smaller media markets, like TL’s, doing fine.”

  • Poynter Online’s Maurreen Skowran writes, “Amy Gahran is right that ad departments need to be souped up, as she said in comments to Rich Gordon’s Oct. 15 Tidbit on business models.”

  • John Robinson, News & Observer Editor discusses, “Yellow journalism and selling newspapers”

  • AU also announced, “American University’s Center for Social Media and the Digital Freedom Campaign will host a panel discussion on digital media rights featuring executives from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), followed by a free concert with independent musician Samantha Murphy. The panel begins at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday Oct. 24, in the Wechsler Theater, located on the 3rd floor of the Mary Graydon Center on the university’s main campus. The concert will start at 7:30 p.m. in the Tavern on the 1st floor of the Mary Graydon Center.”

  • “Bad Legal Week For Reporters” reports FishbowlNY.

  • ValleyWag reports, “NBC Universal has quietly pulled the official channel on YouTube the two companies established last June.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Can you believe GodTube.com? First, the upstart Christian video site became the nation’s fastest-growing Web property for August, according to ComScore’s Media Metrix. Its 1.7 million unique visitors represented a 973% increase in traffic over the previous month. In September, the number of visitors leveled off, but the length of the average user’s stay nearly doubled to a healthy 7.7 minutes, ComScore said.”

  • New York Post reports, “As the entertainment industry ramps ups the pressure on Google, MySpace and other Web companies to better police the illegal online trading of movies and music, it’s already looking toward even bigger fish to join in its battle against digital piracy: Internet service providers.”

  • San Francisco Chronicle reports, “In 2005, when Silicon Valley entrepreneur Michael Arrington started TechCrunch, his popular blog on Internet startups, he saw it mainly as a chance to indulge his obsession with young technology companies. But it turned out that Arrington had latched onto something big. TechCrunch became the go-to site for the scoop on new Web companies. And, as technophiles flocked to TechCrunch, advertisers followed suit. Arrington’s blog morphed from a labor of love into a fast-growing business.”

  • Media Post reports, “You’ve heard this before but probably have a hard time believing it. After all, your local newsstand is crammed with all sorts of newspapers, magazines, newsletters and free copies of The Onion, while Barnes & Noble has mountains of new titles and attracts legions of highly caffeinated book buyers. Perhaps you think rumors of print’s impending demise are exaggerated. They aren’t. But don’t worry. You won’t miss it either.”

  • FishbowlNY reports, “Friend of Mediabistro Russ Baker’s new Real news Project just scored an interesting story in conjunction with The Nation: Hillary Clinton has lured away ex-George W. Bush financier Alan Quasha to work with the Clinton campaign in an undisclosed capacity”

    Jobs

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Newsperson.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.05.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • We can’t say we are shocked by the results of yesterday’s poll. You would rather fight like Mike Tyson than talk like him.

  • An ABC release announced, “In the largest expansion of ABC News’ foreign bureaus in two decades, ABC News’ President David Westin announced the deployment of seven reporters to posts around the globe. ABC’s reporters will be based in New Delhi, India; Mumbai; India, Seoul, South Korea; Jakarta, Indonesia; Rio De Janeiro, Brazil; Dubai, UAE; and Nairobi, Kenya.”

  • Cartoonists enjoy evening in the sun

  • ABC also announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday September 30, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among both Total Viewers and among Adults 25-54. ‘This Week’ posted the most growth of the Sunday discussion programs compared to last year, in double-digits, among both Total Viewers and Adults 25-54. ‘This Week’ is also the only Sunday discussion program up year-to-date (5%) among Total Viewers.” Also, for the week of September 24, 2007, “ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ continued its growth trend in Total Viewers. ‘Nightline’ grew for the second straight week in a row reaching its best Total Viewer number since May.”

  • Today’s edition of National Journal On Air will feature Senator Edward Kennedy in the weekly newsmaker interview with host Linda Douglass. “Douglass will ask Senator Kennedy about the battle over children’s health insurance, the Democrats’ efforts to change course in Iraq, and the political landscape in 2008.” The show airs on Friday at 1pm on XM channel 130. It will also be streaming live and available to the public on http://nationaljournal.com/onair/

  • Telemundo announed in a released that along with mun2, the preeminent voice for Latino youth, launched “‘Vota Por Tu Futuro’ — ‘Vote 4 UR Future,’ the networks’ national non-partisan Hispanic voter registration campaign.”

  • Slate’s Ron Rosenbaum writes, “Don’t get me wrong, I love magazines. I’ve written for a wide range of them, from Punk to The New Yorker. They are—or were—a great American phenomenon. But magazines, many of them anyway, are now slowly killing themselves, killing their credibility, by turning into fawning fools for access.”

  • ‘E&P’ Goes Audio! Listen to Exclusive Discussion About Troubling Drop in Newspaper Ad Revenue Now”

  • Politico’s Mike Allen will soon go on a diet: “Playbook is coming to you live from the Radisson in Manchester, N.H. Yesterday’s Rudy road trip included the Chocolate Moose, three diners (yum.) and a town hall.”

  • The Federal Citizen Information Center of GSA’s Office of Citizen Services is launching our new blog, Govgab. The purpose of the blog “is to highlight government services and information that many people may not know about and show them how to use it in their everyday lives. We have five bloggers and one will post each day of the week.”

  • In a release yesterday, MySpace announced an agreement with PayPal “enabling non-profits and political candidates to virally fundraise throughout the site’s civic and political hub, the Impact channel (http://impact.myspace.com). This marks the official launch of the Impact Channel which will feature new tools including a volunteer search and match tool ‘Volunteer Space,’ a daily issue-based poll, and a voter registration tool.”

  • Journal-isms reports, “CBS-TV and ABC-TV defended their networks’ pieces on Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas amid criticism that ’60 Minutes’ and ‘Nightline’ had offered up uncritical ‘puff pieces’ as they interviewed Thomas in connection with his new memoir, ‘My Grandfather’s Son’” And, “Justice Holds News Media in Contempt

  • Joseph Turow is the Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication, writes, “Google’s decision to spend $3.1 billion to buy little-known DoubleClick will affect the future of American media and the way advertisers tell stories about you and me. Eventually, if Google has its way, what we see on the Web, hear on the radio or read in print will largely be based on decisions Google computers make about how different we are and why.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Gannett Co., the largest U.S. newspaper publisher, would see ‘minimal’ impact if it spun off its television business from the newspaper operations, according to a report from bond-research firm Gimme Credit LLC.”

  • Do you know who the second longest-serving senator from New Mexico is? Test your knowledge with this week’s CQ Political Trivia.

  • Freakonomics reports, “In my opinion, Craigslist is one of the most revolutionary elements of the Internet revolution: simple, scalable, useful, powerful, and therefore omnipresent. So I am very happy to announce that Craig Newmark and Jim Buckmaster, the company’s founder and CEO, respectively, have agreed to answer your questions about Craigslist. As always, leave your questions in the comments section below, and we will post their answers within a week or so. Although many questions are welcomed, time and space may not allow for all of them to be answered.”

  • Sydney Morning Herald reports, “Rupert Murdoch is set to face a challenge to his family’s control of News Corp at its annual shareholder meeting this month, after one of the world’s most powerful shareholder advisers recommended fund managers back a move to change the company’s share structure.”

  • BtoB reports, “Senior executives, including C-level officers at large and midsize companies, have a voracious appetite for quality business information, according to a survey released Tuesday by Ipsos Media.”

  • TV Week reports, “In a world of turbocharged media options, word of mouth remains the most trusted form of advertising around the world. In a semi-annual survey, the Nielsen Co. found that consumers trust other consumers more than they trust messages from paid media advertising.”

  • Susan D. Whiting is the executive vice president of the Nielsen Company and chairman of Nielsen Media Research writes, “Conventional wisdom these days has it that television is dying. Like most conventional wisdom, it’s dead wrong.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Mel Karmazin, chief executive of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc., said the U.S. Department of Justice is seeking more details on the broadcaster’s proposed acquisition of XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc.”

  • Folio Magazine reports, “CMP has launched a new Web site that it touts as, ‘investigating the future of the Internet.’ Internet Evolution leverages four Web 2.0 content sources: bloggers; broadband video documentaries and interviews, investigative reporters from CMP writers and user-generated content.”

    Jobs

  • Reuters is looking for a Freelance Junior Producer and Journalism Interns for Summer 2008.

  • PBS Newshour is looking for an Online NewsHour Associate Editor/News.

  • AUVSI is looking for a Magazine Associate Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 08.27.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Redskins? You’re not really into it.

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News Digital increased unique visitors 19% to 9.9 million in July 2007 versus the same time last year, and ranked in ninth place in the Top 20 of general news sites, according to the Nielsen NetRatings.”

  • CNN announced in a release, “Former President Bill Clinton will appear on CNN’s Larry King Live on Wednesday, September 5, at 9 p.m. (ET) to discuss his latest book, Giving: How Each Of Us Can Change The World.”

  • This week, the Washington Journal will focus on 5 major cities and their issues. Each day, they will first talk with the city’s mayor about the economic and political issues facing their areas. They started yesterday in Dallas and today they are in Detroit. Tomorrow — Miami.

  • Dana Bash knows her Seinfeld.

  • Watching Matt Drudge

  • Jeff Gannon looks at Dana Milbank and asks, “Why does anyone take him seriously?”

  • Deborah Howell on “How to have your say.”

  • Why are we showing you this? Because it’s the funniest thing we’ve seen in a long time.

  • According to the Pew News Interest Index, “For the second week in a row, the plight of six miners trapped in a Utah mine dominated public interest.”

  • Reuters reports, “The presidential election is 14 months away and with as many as 17 candidates now running, U.S. television and radio broadcasters are elated at the prospect of billions more in advertising dollars.”

  • There are only 10 days left to take advantage of Mediabistro’s Back to School Sale. The deadline is Friday, August 31. Take any online class starting in September and get a Mediabistro On Demand video for free. Get details here.

  • Michael Silence on knoxnews.com raises the question of “Proper attribution on blogs”

  • Ed Driscoll.com reports that Technortati has reached 100 million blogs.

  • Huffington Post reports, “MSNBC Victimized by Even Faker Source of Fake News”

  • Media Matters reports, “O’Reilly asserted ‘most journalists give money to Democrats’ — but study on subject refutes him”

  • TMZ.com reports, “Alleged Mom Beater Gets Testy with Reporter”

  • Think Progress reports, “Fox News and the CBC Institute have decided to postpone their planned Sept. 23 Democratic presidential debate in Detroit. The CBC Institute explained in a statement that the ‘overwhelming number of party presidential debates has created a scheduling challenge.’”

  • Lloyd Grove is now a columnist for Portfolio.

  • Christian Science Monitor takes a look at Omar Fekeiki, an Iraqi intern for the Washington Post. “It was two weeks into his Washington Post internship when the difference between life here and life in Iraq — the different value placed on death, and in turn, life — became startlingly apparent.”

  • E&P reports, “In a decade-plus of Web exploration, nearly every daily has felt the growing pains that any new news tool requires.”

  • His Extreme-ness tell us, “Why C-SPAN Is Better Than Nancy Grace And Dennis Hopper Combined”

  • The Age’s Rachel Buchanan writes, “the closed universe of the newspaper office, those trade-based temples to type where printers and proofreaders and journos could all sit down in a staff canteen and eat the same awful food together, is vanishing. Did we journalists miss this story because it is our own?”

  • Laura Sessions Stepp has an article in the latest Cosmopolitan, Feministing reports.

  • Washington City Paper’s Erik Wemple writes, “The Washington Post goes on, and on, and on about the lazy, hazy days of August.”

  • PBS Ombudsman Mike Getler reports, “Over the last many years, reporters have grown fond of the once-secret tape recordings of White House conversations made by former President Richard Nixon. They are sometimes jokingly referred to as ‘the gift that keeps on giving,’ not just because each new batch that gets released is likely to reveal something new, but because they almost always produce stories and give journalists and commentators something to write about. I’m beginning to think the same way about Bill Moyers and his weekly Journal on PBS.”

  • Woodruff Chronicles Senator’s Recovery

  • Web 2.Oh…really? writes, “The folks at CNN have figured out what editors of newspapers figured out by the 1920s or so but then (how?) forgot when they made the transition to the Web: People skim the news, scanning headlines, decks, picture/captions, and reading (sometimes) ledes and (rarely) the story to the jump and (very rarely indeed) all the way to the end.”

  • Slate asks, “Do soldiers have free speech rights?”

  • Radio Ink reports, “In a just-released study, SNL Kagan estimates that 84% of the US population, including consumer, business and double users, will have mobile phones by the end of 2007, with this percentage surging past 100% by 2013.”

  • Reuters Health reports, “People who spend more pre-bedtime hours using the Internet or watching television are more likely to report that they don’t get enough sleep, even though they sleep almost as long as people who spend fewer pre-bedtime hours in front of a computer or television screen, survey findings show.”

  • From a reader and GW alum: “Cover of city paper is why gw is so expensive. One reason: full page gw ad on page nine. Thanks for spending my money well, oh alma mater.”

  • Time’s Mark Halperin is on CBN.com. Watch Halperin on Hillary Clinton here and Halperin on The Power of Drudge here.

  • “Join Reason, MTV’s Kurt Loder, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters, Fox News Channel’s Judge Andrew P. Napolitano, SEC Commissioner Paul Atkins, Lynn Scarlett, deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Interior, and numerous others at ‘Reason in DC’ at the Ritz Carlton, October 26th and 27th. The event will also feature a launch party for Reason.tv, Reason’s new video journalism project featuring The Price Is Right and Power of 10 host Drew Carey. For registration details and more information, please click here.”

  • Dana Perino was on NPR this weekend, defending one of the first dogs, Barney. A hilarious exchange ensued:

      MR. SAGAL: Alright, well. Dana, so — and we know that you, unlike Mr. Rove, are still employed at the White House — and we ask you this: Is Barney, in fact a lump?

      MS. PERINO: I wouldn’t call him a lump. Of course, you’re right, Karl is on his way out the door. Look, Barney’s kind of standoffish, but he’s got personality. He’s got a little bit of sass. You know, I don’t think — he doesn’t let people get too close to him.

      MR. SAGAL: What does Barney think about Rove?

      MS. PERINO: Well, I did see one thing last week when we were down in Texas. In fact it was actually more Ms. Beasley. They alternated from wanting to be petted by him to growling at him. So it was maybe a love/hate relationship.

      KYRIE O’CONNOR: So Karl didn’t have to, like, carry the pooper-scooper or anything?

      MS. PERINO: No, that job is reserved for other people. Like me.

      MR. SAGAL: Really?

      MS. PERINO: Well, I do deal with — I deal with the press a lot.

    Touche Dana. Touche

  • Poynter Online reports, “This week Congressional Quarterly and the St. Petersburg Times launched Politifact, a refreshing approach to campaign coverage that pulls the rhetoric apart into components that can be examined, analyzed, and compared.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “A high-calorie tradition that started in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks is still going strong at cnn’s Washington HQ thanks to the sweet tooth of Larry King Live senior editorial producer Carol Buckland. Surrounded by harried and hungry colleagues covering 9/11, she decided to bake some brownies one day and has been hauling in the treats every Monday since. … Newsman Wolf Blitzer is her biggest fan: ‘If left unchecked, I could become a cookie monster.’”

  • Media Life reports, “When readers think of their newspapers, one of the last things they think about is design. Newspapers are utilities, information delivery systems. Delivery systems need to work, not look pretty. Newspaper editors especially have stuck with that notion, resisting all but the most minor redesigns. Suddenly, all this is changing. What’s likely coming is a period of dramatic change in newspaper design.”

  • A reader points us to this from Thursday’s Last Call: “And speaking of the Watergate, we have a mouse.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Rupert Murdoch doesn’t yet own the Wall Street Journal, but he’s already flexing his muscles. In the last two weeks, the chairman of News Corp. has called at least three reporters who were considering leaving the top financial publication and asked them to stay, people familiar with the calls said Thursday.”

  • Mercury News reports, “Craig Newmark, founder of the eponymous craigslist classified site, had left his creation behind, the Silicon Valley gossip blog reported Thursday.”

  • NewsBusters Noel Sheppard writes, “As the new season of HBO’s ‘Real Time’ began Friday night, I watched with great trepidation, especially given host Bill Maher’s disgraceful special on that network back in July wherein he spent virtually two-thirds of the program bashing President Bush and anyone with an “R” next to his/her name.”

    More fallout from Salon’s FishbowlDC Hottest Media Types article

  • From Knoxnews.com: “Media credibility takes another hit”

  • And from Reason: “Revenge of the Nerds”

  • Yet some more hotness coverage, this time from Freakonomics.

    Conservatives continue to hammer away at TNR over the “Baghdad Diarist”

  • From Pajamas Media: “TNR Targets Bill Kristol, NOT Pajamas Media”

  • From The Corner: “… that apparently has become Sullivan’s modus operandi — in frenzied fashion to toss out slurs and then to grow silent when they are refuted.”

  • From Classical Values: “Confabulation of fabulism?”

  • From Confederate Yankee: “A Sorry State of Affairs”

  • From Roger L. Simon: “Changing the story when you’re under attack is such an overused and obvious technique that you’d think people would be embarrassed to employ it. But not Jonathan Chait at The New Republic who jumps into the fray with a largely ad hominem attack on William Kristol in order to deflect criticism of TNR in the ongoing Scott Beauchamp scandal.”

  • From Hugh Hewitt: “The journalistic Romper Room that is The New Republic has belched forth another seminal piece that future historians will use to chart the once great magazine’s decline into extinction.”

  • Slate reports, “Andrew Sullivan excoriates pundits who exhibited ‘spectacular misjudgment about the war in Iraq,’ something that he says ‘should consign the author to irrelevance.’”

  • From NonParty Politics: “Andrew Sullivan: Blaming Everyone But Beauchamp

    Jobs

  • American Federation of Government Employees is looking for a Communication Specialist.

  • “Save the Bay” Chesapeake Bay Foundation seeks a Virginia Media & Communications Assistant.

  • Susan Davis International is looking for a New Media Director.

  • Times Community Newspapers is looking for a Reporter.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Director, Operations, News & Administration, a Director, Afternoon Programming, a Director, Morning Programming, a Deputy Managing Editor, News & Information
    and a Supervising Senior Producer, Weekend All Things Considered.

  • The Washington Times is looking for a Content Producer.

  • U.S. News & World Report magazine is looking for an Investing/Personal Finance Reporter.

  • The Washington Post is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

  • Patrick Henry College is looking for a Journalism Professor.

  • The Society for HR Management is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • The News and Advance is looking for a Reporter.

  • Council for Advancement and Support of Education is seeking a Magazine Editor.

  • Oxfam America is looking for a Press Officer.

  • The Townsend Group is looking for a National Sales Manager.

  • The Magazine Group is looking for a Managing Editor/Technology.

  • Dana Press is looking for a Production Director.

  • Fox News Channel is looking for an Associate Producer, Weekend Live.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 05.09.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • An ABC release announced “World News with Charles Gibson” was “the #1 evening newscast among Total Viewers, Households and Adults 25-54 for the week of April 30.” Averaging 8.10 million Total Viewers, “World News” won every night last week in both categories, outperforming NBC’s “Nightly News” by 610,000 Total and 210,000 key demo viewers. “This marks ABC’s greatest Total Viewing advantage over NBC in twenty months.”

  • Robert Stacy McCain has excerpts from the interview The Washington Times did with Michelle Malkin and HotAir.com’s Executive Producer Bryan Preston.

  • From a reader: “The most fun of the North Portico was the race of the photogs the brits against the US to get first on to the Stands…. sort of finished off a race horse weekend. Which do you think the Queen would have bet on?”

  • TNR gives readers “a selection of foreign authors whose domestic reputation far outpaces their standing in the United States, and whose work has recently become available in English.”

  • Washington Post Assistant Managing Editor of Investigations Bob Woodward, did an online chat yesterday about former CIA Director George Tenet’s book, “At the Center of the Storm: My Years at the CIA.”

  • Carl Bialik reports, “Mike Conway, an assistant professor of journalism at Indiana University, “set out to study the number of times Fox News commentator Bill O’Reilly used name-calling and other propaganda techniques on his show. Mr. Conway released his report and then watched Mr. O’Reilly employ some of the same methods to ridicule the research —- the TV host even counted how many times he called someone a name in his rebuttal.”

  • News And Tech reports, “Craigslist founder Craig Newmark said newspapers’ hallmark should be in investigative journalism, even as he predicted a dismal future for ink-on-paper distribution.”

  • Express’ Fit section’s Vicky Hallett is a new columnist for The Post’s Health section. Hallett and The Post’s Howard Schneider are now the weekly MisFits columnists.

  • Guardian Unlimited reports, “Reuters chief executive Tom Glocer will take the top job if the proposed takeover by Thomson is successful.”

  • C-SPAN announced the 2007 C-SPAN StudentCam winners are announced during “Washington Journal,” yesterday. The grand prize winning video is “Jupiter or Bust: The El Sol Solution,” by Zach Chastain, Bryan Cink and Ryan Kelly of Jupiter, Fla. which explores the national issue of illegal immigration and the proposed solution in their community.

  • The New York Observer reports that Jill Abramson was in a traffic accident yesterday morning and Bill Keller sent a memo to the newsroom explaining what happened: “She is conscious (in fact, she managed to be both funny and stoic through her morphine haze, so the essential Jill seems to be intact) but she has a badly broken leg and is being checked for other injuries.”

  • The controversy generated by George Tenet’s “new book was the fourth biggest story last week, filling 5% of the overall newshole, according to PEJ’s News Coverage Index from April 29 through May 4. But the Tenet tempest was really part of a bigger subject—the conflict in Iraq—that continues to dominate the media landscape like no other issue, and which last week spawned many different story lines.”

  • The former features editor at the Boston Globe, Lincoln Millstein, “suggested Monday to attendees at the Newspaper Association of America’s annual convention in New York: turn over all lifestyle and service-oriented features stories to readers and have them write the stories,” writes Forbes’ Louis Hou.

  • The Salt Lake Tribune reports, “In the Friday night matchup between Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson and conservative pundit Sean Hannity, it was local Fox affiliate KSTU Channel 13 that came out the big winner.” The station “garnered the best Friday night ratings in at least 15 years and possibly ever, said KSTU marketing research director Melissa Freeman.”

  • A reader shares a homemade joke: “Q: What do the new Newseum and Katie Couric have in common? A: They both cost just as much with the same amount of public interest”

  • Will Bunch asks, “why in the name of God are four working journalists among those attending this state dinner — not as reporters with a notebook or a camera but as guests munching on Dover sole and dancing into the night with America’s own brand of dukes and earls?”

    Jobs

  • The American Gastroenterological Association is looking for a Design/Production Manager.

  • Richmond.com is looking for an Editor.

  • The United States Coast Guard is looking for someone in Public Relations.

  • Intelligence Press, Inc is looking for a Reporter.

  • Bisnow on Business is looking for Writers/Reporters/Editors.

  • Oceana, Inc. is seeking an Editor/Writer with a passion for Ocean advocacy.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Department Coordinator and a Communications Specialist.

  • National Association of Manufacturers is looking for a Corporate Communications Specialist.

  • The Daily Record is looking for a Lawyer with a passion for journalism.

  • One Economy Corporation is looking for a Senior Content Producer for Health and a Copy Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext