TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Daniel Schorr’

Fishbowl’s Finest: Guy Raz

Photobucket

Photobucket

Our male beauty of the day is NPR’s dapper Guy Raz. He’s the weekend host of NPR’s “All Things Considered.” Born and bred in Los Angeles, Raz, despite his super stylish hairdo, isn’t necessarily flashy. Word has it, he’s not stereotypical LA and is said to have a studious, mischievous streak. His bio says he’s just as likely to do a segment on international politics as he would a cooking feature or a chat with a Borneo-born jazz singer.

Raz jumped in from the lowest ranks of NPR as an intern in 1997. His first job there was as personal assistant to the late Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr. He became NPR’s Berlin Bureau Chief in 2000. In 2004 Raz left to be a Jerusalem correspondent for CNN. He returned to NPR in 2006.

He developed what has turned out to be a popular feature for NPR – it’s called “Three Minute Fiction.” Check it out here.

He’s a smart one, this Raz, and not just a pretty face. He has a master’s degree in history from Cambridge University (yes, the one in England).

Mediabistro Course Management 101

Become a better manager in our new online boot camp, Management 101! Starting October 27, MediabistroEDU instructors will teach you the best practices being a manager, including, how to transition into a management role, navigate different team personalities, plan a team event and more! Register before September 30 to get $50 OFF with early bird pricing. Register now!

The post Featured Post appeared first on MBToolBox.

NPR’s Daniel Schorr Dies at 93

cbs5.jpg
Schorr as a CBS News Correspondent

Daniel Schorr, a pioneer of broadcast journalism who was part of Edward R. Murrow’s legendary CBS team, died peacefully this morning after a short illness, his family informed NPR. NPR stated in a release that he was surrounded by his family at the time of his death. Since 1985, Schorr was a senior news analyst for NPR, interpreting national and international events in conversation and commentary on “Weekend Edition” and “All Things Considered.”

Scott Simon, host of Weekend Edition, which became Schorr’s broadcast home for the past quarter century, said of his passing: “I was privileged to know Dan Schorr for 25 years and cherish him as a fierce journalist, and a tender friend and father. We used to joke, ‘I’m not Dan’s son. But I play Dan’s son on the radio.’ Sharing the studio with him, and so many laughs and memories, has been the blessing of a lifetime.”

NPR is remembering Schorr on-air and online with obituaries, a photo gallery and an archive of Schorr’s commentaries. To view them, visit www.NPR.Org.

NPC Remembers Cronkite and Hewitt


Rather, Kalb, Schieffer and Schorr last night at the National Press Club.

Marvin Kalb moderated a discussion between Bob Schieffer, Daniel Schorr and Dan Rather last evening at the National Press Club called “A Tribute to Walter Cronkite and Don Hewitt.”

They shared their favorite stories and memories of the “most trusted man in America” and the creator of “60 Minutes.” And they reacted to comments the President made at Cronkite’s memorial service in New York last week. “We find ourselves wondering how he would have covered the monumental stories of our time. Would he have been able to cut through the murky noise of the blogs and the tweets and the sound bites to shine the bright light on substance?”

They agreed with how the President ended that thought too: “And somehow we know that the answer is yes. The simple values Walter Cronkite set out in pursuit of, to seek the truth, to keep us honest, to explore our world the best he could, they are as vital today as they ever were.”

NPC Remembers Cronkite and Hewitt

The National Press Club will hold “A Tribute to Walter Cronkite and Don Hewitt” this Wednesday evening. Former CBS newsman Marvin Kalb will moderate a panel of Bob Schieffer, Dan Rather, and Daniel Schorr, who will all share personal ancedotes about the “most trusted man in America” and the creator of “60 Minutes.”

This event is free and open to the public, though seating is limited. You can RSVP at 202-662-7501.

Book Bash: “The Emperor’s New Clothes”

At Ellen and Gerry Sigal‘s book party for 9/11 Commissioner and Mayer Brown Partner Richard Ben-Veniste, talk veered from Obama’s mission to the Middle East to Watergate (Ben-Veniste was chief prosecutor). His new book, The Emperor’s New Clothes, covers five riveting cases with which Ben-Veniste was associated and the Sigals’ living room looked like Kennedy Center Honors. From Congress, former Senators Ted Stevens and Paul Sarbanes, Congresswoman Jane Harmon and Congressman John Dingell and lobbyist wife Debbie. Media wunderkinds included Newsweek’s Michael Isikoff and Howard Fineman, Sam Donaldson, Daniel Schorr, Nina Totentenberg, Elizabeth Drew, Kim Eisler (Washingtonian) and the New York Times Neil Lewis. Lewis found plenty of time to chat with Senator Stevens’ wife Catherine – perhaps about Senator Stevens’ trial which Lewis covered for the Gray Lady.

kelly one.jpg
Sam Donaldson and Richard Ben-Veniste

kelly 2.jpg
Elizabeth Drew, Michael Isikoff and Howard Fineman

Read more

Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet the Press: Gov. Tim Pawlenty (R) and a roundtable with presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, NBC’s David Gregory, NBC’s Andrea Mitchell, GOP strategist Mike Murphy and NBC’s Kelly O’Donnell.

  • Face The Nation: Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) and former Hewlett-Packard Chairwoman Carly Fiorina and New York Times columnist David Brooks.

  • This Week: Cindy McCain, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) and a roundtable with ABC’s Sam Donaldson, Cokie Roberts, George Will and Matthew Dowd.

  • Fox News Sunday: John McCain and a panel with Brit Hume, Washington Managing Editor of Fox News, Mara Liasson, National Public Radio & Fox News, Bill Kristol, Weekly Standard & Fox News, Juan Williams, National Public Radio & Fox News and the Power Player of the Week is Mike Miller, Director of Operations, Republican National Convention.

  • Late Edition: Gov. Charlie Crist (R-FL); McCain supporter, Gov. Mark Sanford (R-SC); McCain supporter, Fred Thompson (R); former presidential candidate; McCain supporter, Rep. John Boehner (R-OH); House Minority Leader; McCain supporter, Rep. Eric Cantor (R-VA); McCain supporter, Gov. Tim Pawlenty (R) Minnesota; McCain Supporter, Nancy Pfotenhauer, McCain Campaign adviser, Tom Daschle (D); former Senate Majority Leader, Obama Supporter, Sen. Christopher Dodd (D) Connecticut, Obama Supporter, David Paulison, FEMA Administrator, Howard Kurtz, host, CNN’s “Reliable Sources” media reporter, The Washington Post, Dana Milbank, columnist, The Washington Post, CNN contributor, Roger Simon, chief political columnist, Politico, Lynn Sweet, political columnist, The Chicago Sun-Times, Rachel Sklar, media editor, TheHuffingtonPost.com and Amanda Carpenter, national political reporter, Townhall.com. This is a three hour special show.

  • Fareed Zakara GPS: Mikhail Saakashvili, President of Georgia, Sergei Ryabkov, Deputy Russian Foreign Minister, Fred Krupp, president, Environmental Defense Fund, Richard Haass, president, Council on Foreign Relations, Andrew J. Bacevich, author, “The Limits of Power”, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University.

  • The Chris Matthews Show: Howard Fineman of Newsweek; Elisabeth Bumiller of the New York Times; Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune; and Kelly O’Donnell of NBC News.

  • Roll Call TV with Robert Traynham: Roll Call’s David Drucker, Erin Billings and Emily Heil.

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Minority Leader Rep. John Boehner (R-OH), Republican National Convention Chairman will be interviewed by Patrick Healy, New York Times, Political Reporter.

  • Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Obama’s chief campaign strategist David Axelrod, Margaret Carlson, Kate O’Beirne and Bloomberg’s Hans Nichols.

  • This Is America with Dennis Wholey: NPR’s Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr, author of “Come to Think of It: Notes on the Turn of the Millennium”

  • Larry Kane, Voice of Reason: GOP Leadership Council political director Mike Inganamort and Obama Pennsylvania communications director Sean Smith.

    Note: Reliable Sources is pre-empted.

  • Morning Reading List, 03.20.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington. Did you go to The Express’ happy hour last night at The Greene Turtle? Or perhaps you were at Al Neuharth Free Spirit Conference’s evening gala, which recognized “Free Spirit of the Year” Cathie Black. Or yet another birthday party for that reporter with the curliest chest hair in the business?

    The Newseum’s getting some serious dough, Tim Russert’s bobblehead only went for $46 on eBay, U.S News & World Report’s Alex Kingsbury, just back from Iraq, will be on Jon Stewart Thursday night and Lauren Conrad’s coming to the WHCA dinner!

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • It’s not even close — you think the D.C. protests yesterday were annoying as hell.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Barbara Paulsen, former senior editor of National Geographic magazine, has been promoted to assistant executive editor for text.”

  • Washington Business Journal reports,Cliff Sloan, the publisher of Slate and vice president of business affairs at The Washington Post Co.’s online media subsidiary, will join the law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP in June as a partner in its intellectual property group.”

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The New York Observer reports,David Paterson and the Art of the Leak”

  • Reuters reports, “Dow Jones & Co, recently bought by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp, is ending an agreement of more than 40 years to carry news from the Associated Press after the AP said it wanted more money.”

  • The Chicago Tribune reports, “Now that Tribune Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Sam Zell’s not swearing so much in his meetings with staff, his national tour of the Chicago Tribune parent’s properties hasn’t gotten much attention. Which is too bad. Because what’s being said as he and Randy Michaels, Tribune Co.’s chief executive of Internet and broadcasting, continue their road show is still newsworthy—even if it has nothing to do with cursing, Cubs and Wrigley Field.”

  • E&P reports, “The Audit Bureau of Circulations has moved closer to an overhaul of how it counts paid newspaper circulation. During a meeting of its board of directors last week in Kiawah Island, S.C., the bureau approved modifications that will affect how publishers report starting April 1, 2009. Among those changes: Newspapers will be considered ‘paid’ by ABC regardless of the price.” And, BtoB reports, “ABC gives initial approval to U.S. newspaper rule changes”

  • The Washington City Paper’s City Blog announced, “You’re invited to celebrate the Best of the Nation’s Capitol at Washington City Paper’s Best Of D.C. Ballot Party at Lounge 201.” It is tonight! “Here’s what you get: Free drinks, free hors d’oeuvre, free conversation with other people who you may or may not like but you can at least make fun of. Plus: An opportunity to cast your votes for the best places and people in the DC Metro Area. Votes for the Best Of D.C. will be tallied on March 27th and the results will be showcased in the City Paper Best Of Issue, hitting newsstands April 18th! Best Of categories include Food and Drink, Arts and Entertainment, Goods and Services, and People and Places.”

  • E&P reports, “You may be surprised to learn that, precisely five years ago, at least one-third of the top newspapers in this country came out against President Bush taking us to war at that time. Many of the papers may have fumbled the WMD coverage, and only timidly raised questions about the need for war, but when push came to shove five years ago they wanted to wait longer to move against Saddam, or not move at all.”

  • John McCain failed the Jeff Stein test — a question Stein asked in 2006, “Can You Tell a Sunni From a Shiite?”

  • The New York Observer reports, “It’s 1 P.M.: Who Is on Clinton Phone? Howard Wolfson: Hillary Spokesguy’s Daily Conference Call Is Hottest Party Line”

  • The Tribune Chronicle reports, “It was incorrectly reported in Tuesday’s Tribune Chronicle that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton answered questions from voters in a local congressman’s office. Reporter John Goodall, who was assigned to the story, spoke by telephone with Hillary Wicai Viers, who is a communications director in U.S. Rep. Charlie Wilson’s staff. According to the reporter, when Viers answered the phone with ‘This is Hillary,’ he believed he was speaking with the Democratic presidential candidate, who had made several previous visits to the Mahoning Valley. The quotes from Viers were incorrectly attributed to Clinton.”

  • The Crimson reports, “Former Managing Editor of the Wall Street Journal Paul E. Steiger spoke last night at the John F. Kennedy Forum at the Institute of Politics about the current recession in the newspaper business, contending that ‘we have not reached the bottom yet.’”

  • Politico’s Michael Calderone reports, “Lame duck reporters are bored”

    Top of post

    TV

  • Obama Ratings Hit, Schedule Stays Packed

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research in metered markets for March 18, 2008, ABC News’ exclusive interview with Barack Obama which aired first on ‘Nightline’ beat ‘Leno’ and ‘Letterman’ in the metered markets. ABC’s ‘Nightline’ averaged a 4.0/9 household rating/share among the 56 metered markets which flew past ‘Leno’ 3.9/10 and ‘Letterman’ 2.5/6. Compared to the prior four week time period average, ‘Nightline’ is up 18% among households.”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “Oh, It’s On: Dan Rather’s Lawsuit Proceeds As Discovery Moves Forward”

  • Huffington Post’s Maia Szalavitz writes, “Wire v. The Media on Drugs II: You’re Right, David Simon, We Suck”

  • Bloomberg reports, “News Corp.’s Fox passed CBS as the most-watched television network after its ‘American Idol’ singing contest topped ratings and the Hollywood writers strike limited competition from scripted shows.”

  • Machinist reports, “How local TV embraced fake news”

  • Media Daily News reports, “Big Video content producers need to come up with aggregate ratings that combine television viewing with online video consumption, says Patrick Keane, vice president and chief marketing officer for CBS Interactive, speaking Monday morning at MediaPost’s OMMA Global conference in Hollywood. The combined rating would provide media buyers with a cross-platform option that’s simpler and more detailed in terms of data, because of online metrics.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “An unusually hefty though widely expected U.S. Federal Reserve rate cut Tuesday led to the biggest Wall Street rally in five years, but media stocks underperformed.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Los Angeles Time reports, “Facebook Inc. is rolling out tighter privacy controls that allow users to decide which friends can see their profile information and other personal details, the popular social networking site announced during a briefing at its headquarters Tuesday.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “The Federal Communications Commission’s auction of valuable wireless airwaves ended yesterday after raising a record $19.6 billion and setting the stage for the first nationwide network that would be open to all devices and software. The FCC would not yet name the winners of airwaves, so it was unknown whether a new company would enter the wireless world to compete against the two biggest carriers, AT&T and Verizon Wireless. Further, the sole bid for a block of spectrum to be used for public-safety workers was far below the minimum price set by the agency.” And, The Wall Street Journal reports, “After 261 rounds of bidding, a government auction of airwaves ended yesterday, raising almost $20 billion from companies hoping to build new broadband wireless networks for next-generation phones and other devices.”

  • Folio reports, “There’s still a lot of Internet out there. And for publishers joining — or cobbling together — mini ad networks, that means revenue. So says a new white paper released late last week by media investment banking firm DeSilva + Phillips. According to the report, Ad Networks: Monetizing the Long Tail, the approval of Google’s $3.1 billion acquisition of DoubleClick shouldn’t spell doom for smaller ad networks.”

  • The National Press Photographers Association announced, “One of the most comprehensive and powerful visual compilations of America’s past five years of war in Iraq has been published by Reuters in partnership with MediaStorm.org. ‘BEARING WITNESS: Five Years Of The Iraq War’ is a multimedia gallery of photography, video, audio interviews, and informational graphics that’s a must-see for photojournalists.”

  • ars technica reports, “The man who spoke for Comcast at Harvard last month has told the Federal Communications Commission that the agency has no legal power to stop the cable giant from engaging in what it calls ‘network management practices’ (critics call it peer-to-peer traffic blocking). Comcast vice president David L. Cohen’s latest filing with the Commission claims that regulators can do nothing even if they conclude that Comcast’s behavior runs afoul of the FCC’s Internet neutrality guidelines.”

  • CyberJournalist reports, “Microsoft is building a new site called ‘Blews’ that scans the blogs to determine what are the hottest news stories.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Mediabistro reports, “So What Do You Do James Bennet, Editor of The Atlantic?”

  • The AP reports,Lynndie England, the public face of the Abu Ghraib prison scandal, told a German news magazine that she was sorry for appearing in photographs of detainees in the notorious Iraqi prison, and believes the scenes of torture and humiliation served as a powerful rallying point for anti-American insurgents.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Politics and Prose announced, “Veteran reporter Daniel Schorr, the last of Edward R. Murrow’s legendary CBS team and currently senior news analyst for NPR, will discuss his book, Come to Think of It: Notes on the Turn of the Millennium, at the Friendship Heights Village Center on Thursday, March 20, at 7:30 p.m.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive is looking for a Senior Producer.

  • Voice of America is looking for a Reporter and a News Division/writer.

  • Freedom House is looking for an Editorial/Program Assistant (Iran Programs).

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.12.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Hooray for hair conditioner.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of October 29, 2007, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ increased among total viewers and Adults 25-54 compared to last year while both CBS’ ‘Letterman’ and NBC’s ‘Leno’ declined.” Also, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday November 4, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ won the key Adults 25-54 demo, outperforming both CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ and NBC’s ‘Meet the Press.’”

  • The New York Observer reports on The Atlantic’s anniversary party, “‘This is so offensive! Why is there a visible VIP area where people are gorging themselves on drinks and shrimp?’ said Steve Ruddy, a 35-year-old actor who lives in the West Village. ‘This is the strangest event I’ve ever been to,’ said Linda Lakritz of the Upper West Side. She said she was expecting a gift bag, and got a copy of The Atlantic instead. ‘It made me really sad,’ said Jennifer Vanasco, another member of the audience. ‘I expect something more from The Atlantic. I mean, I can get this from New York magazine.’”

  • XM-Sirius Merger Made Simple: One Is Always Less Than Two

  • Gannett Blog reports, “A private investment company, Brandes Investment Partners, disclosed today that it has nearly doubled its ownership stake in Gannett. Brandes now owns 11.25% of GCI vs. 6.6% as recently as March 15. The firm was already Gannett’s single-biggest stockholder, after buying a chunk of shares around February of this year. That’s when it appears to have emerged for the first time as GCI’s top investor.”

  • American University announced, “American University’s Center for Social Media, a center within the School of Communication, will host a lecture by Keith Richburg as part of the ‘Foreign Correspondence and the Future of Public Media’ speaker series at 12:45 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 12 in the university’s Mary Graydon Center, Room 324.”

  • FCC Moves to Place Restrictions on Cable TV

  • An ABC release announced, “In a special Veterans Day edition of ‘Nightline,’ Vanity Fair and ABC News’ Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross partner to take a harrowing look at the other war seldom talked about in eastern Afghanistan. Over a six month period, ‘Vanity Fair’s’ Sebastian Junger and Tim Hetherington were embedded with the Second Platoon of the 173rd Airborne and given unprecedented access to the ongoing ground war. … The report brings the viewer inside soldier life in one of the most dangerous region of the war on terror in Afghanistan at a time when the major U.S. ally in the region, Pakistan, roils from a dire political crisis. Brian Ross and ‘Vanity Fair’s’ report on the war in eastern Afghanistan will air on ‘Nightline’ Monday, November 12, 2007 at 11:35pm (ET/PT).”

  • Inside Cable News reports, “CNN is trying a new gimmick during commercial breaks; a countdown clock with a progress bar that keeps track of how long until a program resumes…”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “IAC/InterActiveCorp., which recently announced plans to split off several major businesses, today launched a comedy news site as part of its broader push into online media and entertainment.”

  • A release announced, “The Magazine Group took home 11 Pearl Awards at a November 8 ceremony in New York City. Among the Washington, DC-based firm’s honors were four Gold, three Silver and four Bronze awards. Sponsored by the Custom Publishing Council, the fourth annual Pearl Awards saluted the best in design, editorial and strategic initiatives for B2B and consumer custom publications. A panel of marketing executives, academics, journalists, designers, corporate strategists and publishers evaluated 572 entries from 29 companies.”

  • Washingtonian has the details of the Yahoo summit where Karl Rove “revealed what ad his party would have run if Howard Dean had become the Democrat’s presidential nominee in 2004.”

  • A release announced, “RCN Corporation, a leading provider of video, data, and voice services to residential and business customers, announced today that it has become an official sponsor of
    American University Athletics.”

  • The News Interest Index shows, “Currently, just 16% of Americans name the Iraq war as the news story that first comes to mind when asked what has been in the news lately. In December and January, a period when U.S. policy toward Iraq and President Bush’s troop surge drew extensive news coverage, as many as half or more named the Iraq war as the first story that came to mind.”

  • A release announced, “Yahoo! Inc. … announced that the New York Daily News, the fifth largest newspaper in the United States, has become the largest newspaper to join the Newspaper Consortium.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNBC sure has a fan in Sen. Judd Gregg (R-NH). Today, during Senate floor remarks, he said he was working out at the gym this morning when Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) appeared on the network.”

  • Huffington Post reports, “YOU! Should recycle, but you probably already do — because lovin’ Mother Earth has never been more front-and-center in the national — nay, global — consciousness…and you heard it from Time’s annual “Person of the Year” panel first.”

  • A release announced, “My Damn Channel, an entertainment studio and new media platform, … announced the launch of the Big Fat Brain Channel. Two original episodic comedy series will debut this month from web video veterans Troy Hitch and Matt Bledsoe, who have designed the My Damn Channel site and produced many of its promotional videos including ‘Landlord 2027,’ ‘Doggy,’ ‘The Dizruptor’ and ‘The Way of Harry’ series.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “NPR’S Laura Sullivan named Daniel Schorr journalism prize winner.”

    Jobs

  • The Hill newspaper is looking for Reporters and a Features writer.

  • Washington and Lee University is looking for a Reynolds Program Coordinator.

  • Al Jazeera International is looking for an Assistant Producer.

  • Access Intelligence, LLC is looking for an Assistant Managing Editor.

  • American Lung Association is looking for a Vice President, Communications.

  • Argus Media is looking for a Power & fuels reporter.

  • The Israel Project (TIP) is looking for applicants for a Media Fellowship is open to undergraduate and graduate students as well as recent college or graduate school alumni who are starting their careers in journalism or strategic communications/Israel advocacy.

  • Smithsonian Magazine Online is looking for an Editorial Intern.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Broder: Schorr’s My Role Model

    From here:

      Re: 77 years old: Sir, you may be 77 and The Post may ease up, but watch out, Daniel Schorr keeps a fair pace. I believe he has one or two years on you!

      David S. Broder
      : Daniel Schorr is my role model. I hope to have half his smarts when I’m his age.

    Taking Out The Trash, 03.15.07

  • Imus is not a big hit among media folk.

  • Politico’s Ben Smith reports that it isn’t just the Nevada Democrats who are on the anti-Fox bandwagon. The CBC Political Education and Leadership Institute is has jumped on too.

  • In the wake of the Libby trial, Jack Shafer notes, “The press (including me) may have overreacted in regarding special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald as some sort of Torquemada, and our fears of a shredded First Amendment are starting to look a little overwrought.”

  • From DCRTV:

      XM Ups Straley – 3/14 – DC-based XM Satellite Radio promotes Kevin Straley to senior VP of news, talk, and sports programming. He had been VP for talk programming. Before joining XM in 2001, Straley was program director for Boston talker WRKO…..


  • Silent treatment: Solving the press’s credit problem”

  • Media Fight Request to Close Parts of Israel Lobbyists’ Trial

  • “Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the suspected mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, …confessed to the beheading of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl.”

  • More on TMZDC.com…

  • Coming newspaper wars: The freebies

  • This blogger weighs in (not positively) on the Politico.

  • “‘Fair & Balanced’ Could Enter Hall of Fame

  • The Associated Press reports that Charles Forelle, James Bandler and Mark Maremont from The Wall Street Journal won this year’s Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting for their expose on top business executives who manipulated stock options to reward themselves massive payouts. The prize is $25,000. NPR’s Daniel Schorr won the Goldsmith Career Award for Excellence in Journalism.

  • A reader notes that yesterday was the first day in more than a week that Jeanne Cummings was not on Politico’s front page.

  • Wired News and NewAssignment.net announced the launch of Assignment Zero yesterday, “an attempt to bring together professional writers and editors with citizen journalists to collaborate on reporting and writing about the rise of crowdsourcing on the Web.” Jay Rosen is serving as executive editor. The Washington Post’s Joel Achenbach describes it as “a bit like Wikipedia-meets-Woodward-and-Bernstein.” (Hat Tip: Romenesko)

  • Dude, did the Politico hire the same voice artist that did that Geico ad for their new video?

  • A reader asks, “So… I don’t get it. Are you suggesting that if City Paper wrote a story (on a somewhat pegless, evergreen topic) that The Washington Post shouldn’t even bother? Can’t tell, you might just be joking, but it’s a mentality that affects too many journalists as it is, prompting them to talk themselves out of stories they really should be writing because they don’t want to make the six or seven people who actually read both sources to think that they’re behind the curve. Who loses? The average readers.”

  • A reader weighs in on Politico’s chat: “I find it really annoying that the politico chat was upside down. Reading from the bottom up annoys me.”

  • The Washington Examiner is hiring a Payroll Coordinator and a Sales Assistant.

  • Congressional Quarterly is hiring a User Interface Designer and Developer.

  • Fox News Channel is hiring a producer for their Washington DC bureau.

  • Marketing Associate, Atlantic Media Company

  • Web Developer, U.S. News & World Report