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Posts Tagged ‘David Muir’

Diane Sawyer Introduces Incoming ‘World News Tonight’ Anchor David Muir in Promo

In a new promo for ABC News “World News Tonight,” former anchor Diane Sawyer introduces incoming anchor David Muir and highlights his reporting for the network, from the revolution in Egypt, earthquake in Haiti, and tsunami in Japan to Tehran, Iran and Mogadishu, Somalia.

Muir picks up where Sawyer left off at ABC News’ “World News Tonight” on Tuesday, September 2, at 6:30pm.

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Diane Sawyer Signs off as Anchor Wednesday Evening of ‘World News’

Screen Shot 2014-08-28 at 08.01.46Diane Sawyer signed off as anchor of ABC’s “World News” Wednesday night after announcing yesterday on Twitter it would be her final broadcast.

ABC said in June that Sawyer would soon step down after five years as anchor, to be replaced by the program’s weekend anchor David Muir.

Sawyer will remain with the network and in June, ABC News president James Goldston explained, “She will create innovative television specials and events, and, of course, continue to conduct the biggest interviews with the most important and extraordinary people in the world.”

Sawyer’s sign off:

“And now it is time to say good night. And I just want you to know what a deep privilege it has been to sit in the anchor chair at ”World News” these years, the flag ship broadcast of ABC where Peter Jennings created a signature of such curiosity and courage. It has been wonderful to be the home port for the brave and brilliant forces of ABC News around the world and to feel every single night you and I were in a conversation about the day together.

Sometimes, as we know, there have been tough stories on “World News,” but you always made it clear, like me, you believe better will come, that the future is one of possibility. And there has been so much to celebrate here as well, connections, community, America, and the generosity of our neighbors next door. I want you to know none of that will change. ”World News” is dedicated to what informs, and we always hope helps make your life better. On a personal note, as I said I’m not going far, down the hall, up the stairs, and I am not slowing down but gearing up in in a new way, already at work on some of the stories that take you into the real lives around us, the ones we rarely get to see.

And starting next week, the anchor and managing editor, David Muir will be right here. He is my friend and you are in strong and steady hands. So one last time: it is good to know you are watching tonight. To Mike and the four grandchildren and the perfect parents, I look forward to being home early for some dinners again. For gratitude during these years, I thank you and I’ll see you right back here on ABC News very soon. Good night.”

Click through for three videos from last night’s broadcast of “World News,” including a tribute to Sawyer, a thank you to her staff including many familiar Washington faces, and her well-wishes for Muir. Read more

DC Media Cover Downed Malaysia Airlines Jet

cnn-breaking-news1This morning, a Malaysia Airlines jet flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur was shot down along the Ukraine/Russia border.

Anderson Cooper quickly took over coverage for CNN’s John Berman, with CNN’s senior White House correspondent Jim Acosta contributing to the report. The network will reschedule “The Sixties” tonight for special coverage of the crash.

Fox News Channel national security correspondent Jennifer Griffin has been reporting on the matter from the Pentagon.

CBS News’ Major Garrett, Bob Orr, Jeff Pegues have reported from D.C. and the network is sending foreign correspondent Mark Phillips to Ukraine, Seth Doane to Malaysia, and foreign correspondent Elizabeth Palmer to Amsterdam.

ABC News’ Martha RaddatzJonathan Karl, and Jim Avila have each contributed to network coverage. Tonight’s ”World News” will air an extended broadcast tonight to cover the crash from 6:30-7:30 p.m. with David Muir anchoring.

Brian Williams took over for Matt Lauer and Savannah Guthrie at 12:59 p.m. on NBC.

Malaysia Airlines will hold a press conference at 4 p.m. ET.

FishbowlDC Top 5 Stories of the Week

This week’s top 5 stories across the site.

5 – David Muir to Replace Diane Sawyer in ‘World News’ Chair, ‘This Week’ Host Takes New Role

4 – CNN Names Samantha Barry Senior Director of Social News

3 – ‘Vote for Rangel’ Rap Ruins Youtube

2 – Chris Jansing Offers First Report as NBC News Senior White House Correspondent

1 – POLITICO’s Dylan Byers Signs off from Life in DC

Mediabistro Morning Roundup – 6.26.14

TVNewser Diane Sawyer Leaving ABC World News; David Muir Takes Over

TVSpy Supreme Court Sides with Broadcasters in Aereo Case

FishbowlNY AP Names Lisa Gibbs Business Editor

SocialTimes Surviving the Facebook Reach Decline

AllFacebook Slingshot Now Available Globally

Lost Remote Remember Those FB Media APIs Announced at f8? They’re Now in Use

FishbowlDC Jose Antonio Vargas on Why He Brought Documented to CNN

AllTwitter Twitter’s Latest Experiment: Retweet with Comment

10,000 Words Truthdig Launches ‘Global Voices’ to Showcase Intl. Female Journos

Inside Mobile Apps Line Turns Three As Line Family of Apps Crosses 1B Downloads

InsideFacebook Snapchat Hires FB’s Global PMD Director Mike Randall

GalleyCat Lionsgate Unveils First Teaser Video for Mockingjay Part 1

PRNewser Q&A: How Can Brands Best Market to Millennials?

AgencySpy Deutsch LA Scores ECD from W+K

MediaJobsDaily How to Deal with the Gross Office Refrigerator

UnBeige Chicago Getting Its Own Architecture Biennial

David Muir to Replace Diane Sawyer in ‘World News’ Chair, ‘This Week’ Host Takes New Role

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David Muir, George Stephanopoulos, Diane Sawyer and ABC News president James Goldston.

ABC News this morning announced that ABC “World News’” Diane Sawyer is set to step down from the anchor chair and is to be replaced by the program’s weekend anchor David Muir starting September 2.

“For many years to come Diane will be a driving force at ABC News with her exceptional storytelling genius,” wrote ABC News President James Goldston in a note to staff this morning. “She will create innovative television specials and events, and, of course, continue to conduct the biggest interviews with the most important and extraordinary people in the world. Starting this summer she will begin to develop these new stories, working closely with me, David Sloan, Almin Karamehmedovic, Jeanmarie Condon, Claire Weinraub and Michael Corn. And, of course, Ben will continue to be a part of this creative process as Diane’s long time editorial partner.” Read more

Elizabeth Warren Sits Down With ABC’s David Muir

David Muir will interview Sen. Elizabeth Warren for ABC “World News with Diane Sawyer.” The Massachusetts Democrat will talk about her new book, “A Fighting Chance,” and field question about her political future. The interview airs tonight. CBS’s Mark Strassmann interviewed Warren for “Sunday Morning” yesterday.

Cubes: Tour of ABC News Headquarters

Here’s an inside look at ABC News. In this episode of mediabistroTV’s “Cubes,” David Muir, weekend anchor of “World News,” gives us a behind-the-scenes tour of the ABC News headquarters.

The ABC complex on Manhattan’s upper west side is home to ABC News, “Live! with Kelly,” and local New York station WABC. Diane Sawyer also makes a cameo in the video (as do her dozens of Emmys).

For more mediabistroTV videos, check out our YouTube channel, and be sure to follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV

Morning Reading List 04.24.09


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Good morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line.

Its day 95 covering the Obama administration and week 12 for us. What we know and what we’re reading this Friday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | NEWS NOTES | JOBS

NEWSPAPERS

Boston Globe: Janet L. Robinson, chief executive of the New York Times Co., today said the company intends to stick to its May 1 deadline to gain $20 million in concessions from unions at the Boston Globe. Without concessions, the Times Co. has threatened to shutter the money-losing newspaper.

And from NYT: The New York Times Company Foundation announced on Thursday that it was suspending grant-making and the company’s matching gift program. “This is a difficult but necessary step,” said Michael Golden, vice chairman of the company and a board member of the foundation.

Jon Friedman weighs in on why the New York Times will be sold.

TV

ABC was the only broadcast network to win an Overseas Press Club Award Wednesday. World News with Charles Gibson won for the David Kaplan Award for best TV spot news reporting from abroad. The winning series of segments, “China’s Earthquake,” featured correspondents Stephanie Sy and Neal Karlinsky.

Ted Koppel won an Edward R. Murrow Award for his Discovery Network series, “The People’s Republic of Capitalism.” All winners here.

TVNewser also reports NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams was awarded an FDNY Humanitarian Award last night.

CBS News has revived its CBS Reports brand for “CBS Reports: Children of the Recession,” a multi-platform initiative to raise awareness about the effects of the economic meltdown on America’s youth. WebNewser has more.

ABC’s David Muir joined today’s Morning Media Menu.

NEWS NOTES

North Korea will put two US journalists on trial- Laura Ling and Euna Lee. They have been under arrest since they were detained on March 17 on North Korea’s border with China. The pair, who work for Current TV, were reporting on Korean refugees living in China.

The NYP reports Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham, whose day job is running Newsweek, has already picked his next project. He will write a biography of former President George H.W. Bush. The book is not an authorized biography, but the Bush family is believed to be cooperating.

David Plouffe and Steve Schmidt go back to school.

HAT TIPS: Mediabistro, Romenesko

JOBS after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 02.04.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • Most of you don’t even wear a watch anymore.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • John Hendren and Jose Antonio Vargas shared a birthday this weekend.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Gannett Co., the largest U.S. newspaper publisher, said fourth-quarter profit declined 31 percent as advertisers cut holiday spending and its television stations sold fewer political ads.”

  • The AP reports, “The board of directors of The Associated Press gave final approval to a new pricing plan Thursday that will overhaul how the news cooperative’s services are packaged and sold to its newspaper members. The changes, which received initial approval from the board in October, will result in about $6 million in savings to AP’s newspaper members when they take effect Jan. 1, 2009, the company said in a statement.”

  • Press duels with Obama over access

  • Politico reports, “With presidential candidates dropping like flies, the television networks are pouring more resources into covering the most famous non-candidate on the campaign trail: Bill Clinton. Now, all the major players — NBC, ABC, CBS, Fox and CNN — have producers on the President Clinton beat, most joining within the past two weeks.”

  • Silicon Alley Insider reports, “When News Corp. bought Dow Jones and the Wall Street Journal last year, part of the rationale was that Rupert Murdoch could use the WSJ’s reporters to help bolster its fledgling Fox Businesss Network — but not for a while. That’s because the WSJ and GE’s CNBC had already signed a contract that gives the cable network the exclusive rights to the Journal’s talent through 2012. Or not. Fox Business now looks set on exploiting what it says is a loophole in the CNBC deal: Fox Business Network EVP Kevin Magee says he thinks he can use WSJ reporters and editors, after all.”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “A Jan. 7 essay on Jewish identity, published on washingtonpost.com’s popular On Faith site, caused a furor and led to two public apologies, a lost job and much recrimination.”

  • New York Times’ readers react to William Kristol.

  • Dan Steinberg writes, “When I saw Dan Hellie walk into the media room this morning looking like he had just taken a few crosses to his temple, I immediately thought…..well, you all can guess what I thought. But no, it turns out Hellie was headbutted yesterday while playing pick-up hoops in Bethesda. The wound required 14 stitches to patch up.”

  • A release announced, “The Los Angeles Times editorial board has endorsed Senator John McCain and Senator Barack Obama in this year’s presidential primary election, marking the first such endorsement since 1972.” Check out the full endorsement here.

  • AlterNet’s Nick Bromell writes, “At some point in our lives, we all dream of playing in the big leagues. But what if our fantasies came true? What if we were suddenly plucked from our crabgrass and dead clover and dropped magically onto the emerald outfield of Yankee Stadium? What would we feel — ecstasy or terror? I suspect that something like this happened to David Brooks when he was summoned from the obscure nook of the Weekly Standard and asked to write a regular op-ed column for the New York Times. Here was someone who had edited a cranky right-wing journal and written a clever book poking fun at baby-boomer bohemians suddenly being required to render informed opinion on everything from global warming to stem-cell research. Is it any wonder that for the past three years we have watched a drowning man flounder in a froth of chatty drivel?Fortunately, his legions of exasperated readers don’t have to wonder whether he’ll ever get his just reward. The truth is that Brooks is already being punished. Deep beneath his protective sheath of psychic blubber, he knows what the Wizard of Oz knew — that he’s a fake and a failure.”

  • Washington Whispers reports on one journo’s opinion of Sen. Barack Obama. “Another reporter, Chicago Sun-Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet, has worked out beside the candidate and describes him as ‘studious and serious, thorough and businesslike.’”

  • Khaled Hosseini writes in the Wall Street Journal, “Ever since the post-9/11 American invasion, the Afghan government has taken great pains to distance itself from the oppressive and unforgiving rule of the Taliban. Afghan leaders have pointed to greater personal freedom and improvements in infrastructure, education and health care as successes of the country’s nascent democracy. But last week we learned that Sayed Parwez Kaambakhsh, a young journalism student, has been sentenced to death for distributing an article that, religious clerics in Afghanistan say, violates the tenets of Islam.”

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    TV

  • A Clinton campaign release announced, “veteran journalist Carole Simpson will serve as moderator for Hillary’s Voices Across America: A National Town Hall. The three-time Emmy award winner will join Hillary at the anchor event in New York. The town hall will be broadcast live on Hallmark Channel and online on the eve of Super Tuesday, Monday, February 4, 2008 at 9 p.m. EST.”

  • A release announced, “The Comcast Network on Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. as CN8 Political Director Lynn Doyle hosts a special three-hour edition of ‘It’s Your Call,’ featuring live, expert analysis of Super Tuesday and the 24 state primary elections taking place that day. The coverage follows CN8′s launch of ‘America’s Next President,’ the network’s most expansive election package to date tracking all major events leading up to the presidential election.”

  • ABC’s David Muir sat down with Sen. Barack Obama. The interview aired this weekend on ABC’s World News Saturday.

  • TVNewser reports, “In addition to coverage on BBC World News America, CNN International and Euro News, MSNBC is getting into the international game this Super Tuesday. NBC has signed an agreement with Channel NewsAsia to carry the network’s coverage from 6pmET Tuesday night to 6amET Wednesday morning.”

  • TVNewser reports, “From politics to parties; from Hooters girls to the President of the United States, FNC’s two hours on the Fox broadcast network this morning accomplished what it set out to do: ‘explore the social impact of the Super Bowl and how it intertwines with politics.’ That line from the press release is about as dry as the Arizona desert. Fox Super Sunday, however, was more exciting.”

  • B&C reports, “Nobody was happier to see John Edwards drop out of the presidential race last week than CNN. That’s because it set up what many Americans—and CNN—wanted to see last Thursday: a one-on-one debate between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. And while the debate didn’t turn into the slugfest many expected, it set the stage for a riveting Super Tuesday matchup between the top Democratic candidates.”

  • The Guardian reports, “Al-Jazeera’s troubled English language news channel is facing a ‘serious staffing crisis’ after scores of journalists left or have not had contracts renewed amid claims of a revolt over working conditions.”

  • From B&C, check out “some thoughts, notes and quotes that didn’t make it into this week’s Left Coast Bias column on spending the day with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer at Thursday’s Democratic debate at the Kodak Theater in Los Angeles.”

  • Huffington Post reports, “Last December, conservative author and CNN election analyst William J. Bennett gave over two thousand dollars to Sen. John McCain’s presidential campaign, a fact that Bennett has not mentioned during any of his appearances on the network, according to a review of transcripts by the Huffington Post.”

  • TVNewser reports, Jon Stewart’s take on The Situation Room’s multitude of monitors, with a special appearance from Spongebob.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS and ABC joined Fox to ask the Supreme Court not to review a lower-court decision that essentially took the Federal Communications Commission to the woodshed for failing to justify its crackdown on fleeting profanity.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser tipster tells us about a situation in New Hampshire (which seems like a really long time ago, now) during the coverage of the primary there. MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was talking with a New Hampshire politician about the state of things in Washington. Matthews told the local pol, ‘Nothing will get done in Washington until there is a large enough majority in the Senate — maybe I’ll run for Senate.’ After explaining he was from Pennsylvania, Matthews said, ‘Casey pulled it off so it’s do-able.’”

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox News Channel ends January with 8 of the top 10 programs. CNN’s Larry King Live (8th) and Lou Dobbs Tonight (10th) filled out the top 10. MSNBC’s highest rated show Countdown with Keith Olbermann came in 19th.”

  • CNN Dem Debate Most Watched in Cable History

  • His Extreme-ness wrote last week, “Send Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton to the freedom of speech woodshed. Boy, did they exhibit a fundamental misunderstanding of C-SPAN during last night’s debate”

  • TVNewser reports, “MSNBC is going to begin Super Tuesday coverage a couple hours early” on Monday night. “The Super Tuesday preview will be anchored by Dan Abrams from 10-11pmET, and by Norah O’Donnell and David Shuster from 11-Midnight.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Reid Wilson’s birthday was Saturday!

  • “KassyK” is leaving D.C.

  • Radar Online reports, “One of the joys of the presidential campaign season is that it allows the Washington press corps to ignore even more substantive stories than usual. With so many reporters detached to the campaign trail, dozens of big stories are either left to the wire services or ignored altogether. Last week the press buried two big stories about how many times the Bush administration has lied in public, and how it has covered up those lies in private. They belonged on the front page.”

  • Salon’s Joe Conason asks, “Will the press get over its love for McCain?”

  • AlterNet reports, James Glassman, the nominee for Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy, probably won’t have much of an impact on how the United States presents itself to the rest of the world. For one thing, he’ll only have 11 months in the post. For another — as his predecessor Karen Hughes proved — putting shinier lipstick on the pig of U.S. foreign policy doesn’t do much to assuage widespread anti-American sentiment. Still, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s January 30 hearing on Glassman’s nomination provided some insight into Washington’s evolving view of public diplomacy.”

  • A release announced, “ABC News NOW’s wall-to-wall coverage of the Super Tuesday Presidential primaries and caucuses will be available LIVE on the Homepage and the Politics section of ABCNEWS.com. Coverage will begin on Tuesday, February 5 at 7:00 p.m., ET and continue through at least 12:15 a.m., ET to report results across all time zones, including California, where polls close at 11:00 p.m., ET.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “As j-schools struggle to keep the skills they teach relevant to the fast-changing media landscape, hundreds other journalists and students have mobilized to teach and support each other informally through a new online social network. Wired Journalists was recently created by Ryan Sholin of GateHouse Media, using Ning (a free set of tools for rolling your own social network). As of this morning, the group has 778 members. Many of them appear to be 20-somethings (j-school students or recent grads) — but there are some gray-hairs there, as well as some notable luminaries from the field.”

  • For Super Tuesday, washingtonpost.com will have six hours of live online-only video coverage and analysis of the results as they come in.

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    MAGAZINES

  • Media Life reports, “Magazine publishing in the U.S. may have become gloomy for certain categories, but worldwide it’s in healthy shape, with emerging markets making up for the slowdowns in mature markets like the U.S. And the picture for magazines worldwide looks brighter still going forward, even if they’re not seeing anywhere the growth in ad revenue as the internet. Worldwide ad spending on magazines grew 2.7 percent in 2007, and that pace is forecast to pick up to 3.4 percent a year through 2010.”

  • Newsweek is “Catching Up With ‘Obama Girl’”

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    RADIO

  • All Forgiven, WIMUS-AM Is on a Roll

  • A release announced, “XM Satellite Radio and SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT today announced that they have resolved the lawsuit brought by SONY BMG against XM over its Pioneer Inno, a portable satellite radio with advanced recording features. The companies did not disclose terms of the deal.”

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    BOOKS

  • Boston Globe reports, “Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Co. is laying off employees in Boston and other offices as it consolidates some of its operations in the wake of its $4 billion acquisition of Harcourt Education, Harcourt Trade, and Greenwood-Heinemann from Reed Elsevier.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes,Craig Silverman’s devotion to the correction as a literary form dates to 2004, when the Montreal-based writer launched his Web site Regret the Error, which traps and displays journalism’s best (and funniest) corrections, retractions, apologies, and clarifications. Silverman’s essential site spawned an equally essential book last fall titled Regret the Error: How Media Mistakes Pollute the Press and Imperil Free Speech, which tells you everything you need to know about the history of journalistic fallibility and the culture of corrections.”

  • The New York Times reports, “A federal grand jury has issued a subpoena to a reporter of The New York Times, apparently to try to force him to reveal his confidential sources for a 2006 book on the Central Intelligence Agency, one of the reporter’s lawyers said Thursday. The subpoena was delivered last week to the New York law firm that is representing the reporter, James Risen, and ordered him to appear before a grand jury in Alexandria, Va., on Feb. 7.”

  • A Friday release from the ACLU announced, “After reports that a federal grand jury issued a subpoena to New York Times reporter James Risen last week in an attempt to force disclosure of a confidential source, the American Civil Liberties Union today strongly objected to the subpoena, saying that basic First Amendment principles are at stake when reporters are called into the courtroom against their will. According to reports, a chapter in Mr. Risen’s book on the Central Intelligence Agency, ‘State of War,’ piqued the interest of the Justice Department and consequently he has been ordered to appear before the grand jury next week.”

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    JOBS

  • Children’s National Medical Center is looking for a PR and Marketing Specialist.

  • The National Academies is looking for a Media Relations Officer.

  • Virilion, Inc. is looking for an Account Director.

  • The Gazette is looking for a sports reporter.

  • JBS International, Inc. is looking for Writer/Editors.

  • The Baltimore Examiner is offering Photo and Writing Internships.

  • Roll Call, Inc. is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Editor.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Reporter, Budget & Appropriations and a Managing Editor, CongressDaily PM.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a News Editor, CQ Today.

  • USATODAY.com is looking for an Ambitious Digital Designer, a Design Developer and a Digital Storyteller.

  • The Martinsville Bulletin is looking for a News Editor.

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