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Posts Tagged ‘Eleanor Clift’

Party Pics: Meet the FT DC

The Financial Times hosted GE Chairman and CEO Jeff Immelt at the Halcyon House in Georgetown last evening. Edward Luce, Tammy Haddad, Chris and Kathleen Matthews, Bob Woodward, Luke Russert, Margaret Carlson, Peter Cherukuri, Eleanor Clift and Charlie Cooke were all in attendance.

Clift, On “Two Weeks Of Life”

Eleanor Clift and Rachel Rosen.JPG

That was Eleanor Clift discussing her new book, “Two Weeks of Life,” with CNN’s Rachel Rosen yesterday at a book salon held by PR firm Dezenhall Resources.

Clift’s book is a personal narrative examining the death of her husband Tom Brazaitis and Terry Schiavo, who died within days of Clift’s husband and became a national news story because of Congress’ involvement. Brazaitis was a Washington columnist for the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Morning Reading List, 03.06.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Alan Greenspan’s birthday and, on this day in 1981, Walter Cronkite signed off from CBS.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • You think John King is hotter than Wolf Blitzer.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • CQ’s Patrick Yoest is heading to Dow Jones

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Daily Collegian reports, “About 400 students gathered in the HUB Auditorium last night to hear esteemed journalist Dana Priest of The Washington Post speak as part of the Foster Conference of Distinguished Writers. Priest is a 2006 recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for her disclosure of secret overseas CIA prisons. She has spent nearly 20 years reporting for The Washington Post, covering the CIA, military and counterterrorism.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “Pulitzer-Winner David Cay Johnston on Times Buyout List”

  • From a tipster:

      the city paper’s article on david nakamura at the post is so silly. the city paper FOIA’d all these emails between Fenty and Nakamura — how much did that process take away from real government work? was this FOIA in the service of the public? or in the service of a bruised ego looking to settle a score?

  • API has “Five questions for … Richard Honack

  • Newspaper Association of America reports, “Some newspapers are methodically going greener, reducing energy consumption and saving money”

  • The Washington City Paper reports, “Nothing seems to make our local paper happier than spotting a neighborhood in the midst of a renaissance, a rebirth, or just sort of coming back. Today, we get the happy headline: ‘A Rapid Renaissance in Columbia Heights’ under the byline of Paul Schwartzman.”

  • Iraq Was Invaded In 2002, As Far As Times Critic Is Concerned

  • The AP reports, “Moody’s Investors Service is considering downgrading New York Times Co.’s credit rating because of declining advertising revenue, the ratings agency said Tuesday. Moody’s is reviewing New York Times’ ‘Baa1′ credit rating, which implies ‘lower-medium grade” credit quality.’”

  • The Washington Post reports, “Regular readers of the Wall Street Journal will notice something new in Friday’s editions — a sports page that uses content from one of the many businesses owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.”

  • Politico reports, “Obama’s Rezko ties escape national radar”

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    TV

  • A tipster tells us, “In a promo for MSNBCs political coverage this morning, shots of most of their ‘personalities’ were shown (in the context of the best political team on TV, or whatever the slogan was) with one notable exception: Tucker Carlson. Why is he ignored by MSNBC management?”

  • TVNewser provides an abridged version of Howard Kurtz’s 2,500 word dissertation on election coverage.

  • In the Center On Primary Night

  • The Deal.com reports, “Timing is everything: Time Warner-Cablevision deal likely”

  • Reuters reports, “Landmark Communications is seeking up to $5 billion for the Weather Channel cable television network, with preliminary bids due next week, according to multiple sources familiar with the matter.”

  • A release announced, “Senator Kerry sent a letter to Kevin Martin, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission today, asking him to investigate an Alabama television station that ‘blacked out’ during a controversial segment of 60 Minutes. Allegations have been raised that the blackout, which the station blames on ‘technical difficulties’, was an example of censorship.”

  • Super Tuesday II: The Cable Ratings

  • TVWeek reports, “Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin may be winning the fight he has picked with TV networks that air racy programming. Mr. Martin’s agency lost the last major indecency court case in federal appeals court and he’s awaiting the Supreme Court’s decision on whether it will resuscitate that action against Fox.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “TV ratings have been the gospel for the broadcasting and ad industries for nearly 60 years. They are the yardstick by which our business has determined success or failure; the reason why ‘Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip’ was canceled, why Fox loves Simon Cowell and why the Super Bowl continues to be the most important TV event every year.”

  • TVNewser reports, “America’s Election HQ, the one-hour political show that premiered last week at 5pmET, has been extended past its original end date of yesterday. The FNC program, temporarily taking the place of Big Story, will air through the end of this week.”

  • A Situation Room viewer writes, “When the phone rings at 3:00A.M., We want Wolf Blitzer to answer the phone in the situation room.”

  • Who’s That Reporter In My Studio?

  • Columbia Journalism Review writes, “Fox Business Network’s populist sensibility is refreshing, sort of, but nobody’s watching. Here’s why

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Mark your calendars! The Washington Blogger March Meeting is set for Wednesday, March 19 at 7:00PM at RFD. To RSVP, click here.

  • Nieman Watchdog reports, “Saul Friedman: Mainstream Black Columnists and Barack Obama”

  • A tipster writes in “pr maven gloria dittus won a big award last night and the national museum of women in the arts. charlie cook introduced her, debbie dingell also at the party.”

  • Folio reports, “National Geographic Renews Legal War Over Digital Archive”

  • DMNews reports, “Southern Progress Corporation (SPC), a subsidiary of Time Inc., has launched an online portal, MyHomeIdeas.com, highlighting content from its shelter magazines and book line.”

  • Journalism.co.uk reports, “iReport launched to be like ‘YouTube with focus on personal reporting’, claims CNN director”

  • Columbia Journalism Review reports,Jeannie Kever began her Houston Chronicle column yesterday — a column applauding the ‘US media’ for avoiding the ‘Texas cowboy stereotype’ in its primary coverage of her state”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Time Online reports, “Permira, the British private equity group, has emerged as a potential suitor for Reed Business Information, the trade magazines arm of Reed Elsevier, which could soon be for sale for about £1.25 billion.”

  • iReport, You Decide (if This Crap is Worth Your Time)

  • Washington City Paper’s Erik Wemple reports, “Washingtonian Publisher Has ‘Liable’ Concerns”

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    BOOKS

  • Washingtonian’s Garrett Graff writes, “Newsweek columnist Eleanor Clift likely wishes she didn’t have a reason to write her new book, Two Weeks of Life: A Memoir of Love, Death and Politics. Two of her previous books were written with her late husband, Tom Brazaitis, Washington bureau chief of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. The new one is Clift’s journal of Brazaitis’s last days, when he was in hospice care with cancer.”

  • Publisher’s Weekly reports, “The New York Times reported Monday that the Far Eastern Economic Review, which Rupert Murdoch recently acquired, killed a review of the Viking Australia book Rupert’s Adventures in China due to the book’s unfavorable look at Murdoch. With the book set for U.S. release this summer, it’s unclear how the media will handle it.”

  • Ars Technica reports, “Book lovers have a message for e-book makers: you can have my paperback when you pry it from my cold, dead fingers. We reported yesterday on the 2008 Digital Entertainment Survey from the UK, which found that 70 percent of Internet users would stop sharing files if they received notification from their ISP. But tucked in the survey data was another fascinating finding about the strength of consumer attachment to traditional paper books.”

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    JOBS

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for an Education Programming Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • “John McLaughlin Is The Funniest Man On Television”?

    Esquire’s Chuck Klosterman looks at “The McLaughlin Group” in the latest issue and has some interesting things to say:

  • “I can’t think of any program that has taught me more about human interaction, if not necessarily about politics or journalism.”

  • Critics sometimes suggest that the success of The McLaughlin Group has led to the erosion of serious discourse in American media, but that’s like complaining about AC/DC because of Rhino Bucket. The failures of its followers only serve to illustrate why The McLaughlin Group is — almost exactly — what televised arguing should look, sound and feel like. The shows that plagiarized the ‘McGroup’ format copied the wrong things; the only quality they duplicated was the volume. What actually makes The McLaughlin Group so continually watchable is a) its inherent understanding of how personal dynamics operate, b) its supernatural ability to incarnate idealized semiotics, and c) the force of one specific personality. The show remains brilliant.”

  • Klosterman describes Pat Buchanan explaining how Eleanor Clift helped Buchanan grieve over his cat Gipper, when he passed away.

  • On John McLaughlin (whom Buchanan describes as “a benevolent dictator”): “The moment the taping concluded, he jumped into a town car, was driven to Reagan airport, and flew to Florida. Our only interaction was a handshake ninety seconds before airtime. He shook my hand and asked his assistant, ‘Who’s this guy?’ It was like shaking hands with a humanoid owl.”

  • “John McLaughlin is the funniest man on television. Has anyone ever generated so much entertainment value from the process of loudly asking questions?”

  • Morning Reading List, 01.25.08

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    Good morning Washington (unless you’re Jewish, in which case you’re bummed that the WHCA dinner falls on Passover). And, on this day in 1961, JFK held the first televised conference. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio)

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think Maureen Dowd would take Eleanor Clift in a street fight.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Tight schedule makes NY Times endorse early

  • The AP reports, “U.S. newspapers’ online audiences grew about 6 percent last year, an industry group reported Thursday, a rare bit of good news for an industry struggling to adapt as readers and advertising dollars continue to migrate online.”

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “Public interest in economic news soared last week amid continued stock market volatility and concerns about a possible recession. More than four-in-ten Americans (42%) followed news about the condition of the U.S. economy very closely and 20% listed this as the single news story they followed more closely than any other. That marks the highest level of public interest in economic news in five years. Interest was only somewhat greater during the recession of the early 1990s.”

  • The Press Gazette reports,Rupert Murdoch has become bored with Britain and his now obsessed with his ‘new toy’ the Wall Street Journal. This was the view of Andrew Neil, former editor of the Sunday Times, who told peers this today to explain why the News International tycoon was no longer ringing the editor of The Sun every day to ask what she was publishing.”

  • A release announced, “Junior Achievement today announced the inductees into its 2008 U.S. Business Hall of Fame, one of the most prestigious honors awarded for success in the business world. Junior Achievement selects inductees for their business excellence, courageous thinking and actions, vision and innovation, inspiring leadership, and philanthropy.” Among the 2008 Junior Achievement U.S. Business Hall of Fame laureates is Al Neuharth, the founder of USA TODAY; Founder and former Chairman, The Freedom Forum; Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Gannett Co., Inc.

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    TV

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News will broadcast President George Bush’s State of the Union address live on Monday, January 28. Coverage will begin at 9:00 p.m., ET and will also include the Democratic response. Charles Gibson will anchor ABC’s coverage from Washington, D.C. He will be joined by ‘This Week’ anchor George Stephanopoulos, Chief White House Correspondent Martha Raddatz, and ABC News commentator George Will. Dan Bartlett, former Counselor to President Bush, will also contribute.”

  • Lindsay Czarniak and Will Thomas make Washington Life’s “Young & The Guest List.”

  • Last Call reports, “In an episode of ‘Family Guy’ that references an infamous vice presidential hunting trip, Karl Rove, Antonin Scalia and Tucker Carlson are inadvertently killed.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “New research from MindShare concludes that the writers strike, which began in November, is beginning to take a serious toll on TV viewing behavior. Almost half of those surveyed in the poll said they were spending more time online as a result of the repeat programming they have encountered because of the strike. More than 60% of viewers said their favorite shows were now in repeat mode.”

  • Eat The Press reports,Jon Stewart: ‘Oh, Bill Kristol, Are You Ever Right?’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Megan Carpentier, Greg Wasserstrom and Hunter Walker have started “The Cynic’s Party.”

  • Washington Times reports on Media CEO Roger L. Simon, the impact of the Internet on politics and the business of blogging.

  • The Bloggies are coming! The Bloggies are coming!

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “No presidential campaign would be complete without self-flagellation by the press about its overreliance on ‘horse race’ coverage. Politico honchos John F. Harris and Jim VandeHei donned the hair shirts earlier this month to compose an apology on behalf of the political press corps for pushing so many horse-race inspired ‘bogus narratives’ on readers. Among the bogus narratives cited by VandeHarris were ‘McCain is dead’ from last summer; Huckabee has no chance in Iowa; Obama is a dud—no, Obama is the bee’s knees!—and the Clinton machine will die in New Hampshire. While I appreciate the pair’s candor, self-reflection, and regret, you can no more divorce ‘horseracism’ (to pinch Brian Montopoli’s coinage) from campaign coverage than you can divorce horseracism from the coverage of horse races.”

  • A release announced, “Helium (www.Helium.com), the leader in online citizen journalism, and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, the leader in international nonprofit journalism, join forces to raise awareness on critical global issues. The partnership provides Helium members with a platform to write about issues raised by the Pulitzer Center, including international affairs that have been underreported, misreported or not reported on at all. … The partnership is the first of its kind online, and gives citizen journalists the opportunity to win an esteemed journalism award from the Pulitzer Center. Helium members can compete by writing to any of Pulitzer’s featured global crisis issues. The Center will then pick from the top-ranked articles in each category and award the winning writer with a Pulitzer Center Citizen Journalism Award.”

  • Reuters reports, “Popular video Web site YouTube.com is opening up its service to run on millions more phones which are capable of using high-speed wireless links, the company said on Thursday. YouTube, a unit of Google Inc, says it is extending its service from a handful of phones to a broader range of devices used by 100 million consumers worldwide that rely on high-speed links to stream videos to mobile screens.”

  • Dow Jones reports, “CSTV.com, a collegiate sports media division of CBS Sports, said Wednesday it entered a digital marketing partnership with USA Today, making several of CSTV’s assets available on USAToday.com.”

  • The Wall Street Journal reports, “The Wall Street Journal’s Web site, WSJ.com, will keep a significant portion of its content behind its paid-subscription wall, News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch said Thursday. … Speculation that News Corp. would make WSJ.com a completely free site had been rife in recent months, since Mr. Murdoch had signaled he was contemplating lifting the subscription wall. Mr. Murdoch had indicated that lifting the pay wall could broaden the Journal’s online audience and boost its Web advertising revenue, offsetting any loss in subscription revenues.”

  • Check out the washingtonpost.com’s new “Buzz Map” feature. It graphically displays the most blogged about places in the D.C., Maryland and Virginia areas.

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    RADIO

  • XM’s POTUS channel cancels a Maine program.

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News will offer live, comprehensive broadcast and webcast coverage of President George W. Bush’s final State of the Union Address and the Democratic response on Monday, January 28m beginning 9:00PM (ET). The program will air on NPR member stations around the country, and can be heard online at www.NPR.org. Robert Siegel, Senior Host of the NPR newsmagazine All Things Considered, anchors the special coverage. He will be joined by NPR News correspondents, political analysts and members of Congress providing analysis of a number of key themes in the President’s address. January 29, the NPR newsmagazine Morning Edition will offer additional coverage, with post-address analysis and up-to-the-minute news from Capitol Hill.”

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Financial Impact Editor.

  • The Futurist magazine is looking for an Editorial/Administrative Assistant.

  • The Winchester Star is looking for a reporter.

  • Safety Net Hospitals for Pharmaceutical Access is looking for a Supervising Editor.

  • The Montgomery County Sentinel is looking for a Reporter.

  • Inside Washington Publishers is looking for Print and online reporters.

  • Legal Times is seeking an Editorial Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Eleanor Clift: Mrs. Sinkhole

    From the Reliable Source:

      Most people know Eleanor Clift as a columnist for Newsweek or beleaguered token liberal on “The McLaughlin Group.” But to her Chevy Chase neighbors, she’s the “lady with the sinkhole.”

      Clift had lived in her home on 30th Street for 27 problem-free years until 2004, when part of her back yard started caving in. She and her neighbors suspect the problem stems from a D.C. road construction project that summer that caused raw sewage to overflow into many of their basements.

    Read the rest here.

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