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Posts Tagged ‘Greg Mitchell’

Morning Reading List, 11.19.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • National Journal reports, “Average time spent consuming news on a typical workday,” broken down by type of Washingtonian.

  • The Pew Talk Show Index for November 4-9 shows, Dennis Kucinich’s call to impeach Vice President Cheney made nary a blip with the general media last week but it was a big story on in the talk media, especially on the left side of the talk radio dial. Meanwhile the many angles of the 2008 campaign gave everyone grist to talk about.”

  • Deb Howell weighs in on Tim Page.

  • Media General D.C. Bureau Shuffle Cuts Staff, Expands Web

  • NYT on Shep Smith: “Fox Cable Guy Edges Into the Big Pay Leagues

  • When it comes to Newsweek’s hiring of Rove and DailyKos, CJR says they “couldn’t be more predictable.”

  • From DCRTV:

      Adrienne Mitchell will host a new show on DC-based XM Satellite Radio’s presidential election channel “POTUS ’08″ (XM-130) starting Monday, 11/19. The former WTOP anchor and editor will host “The Race” weekdays from 7 PM to 9 PM. The show will focus on the campaign news of the day, plus interviews with journalists and newsmakers…..

  • Inside Cable News & Brian Stelter: Together.

  • Jack Shafer on “Big Media Octopuses, Cutting Off Tentacles” and “Why Newspapers Love the Striking Screenwriters

  • Inside Cable News’ What’s Hot/What’s Not.

  • Local Oscar hopes for Sean and Andrea Nix Fine and Ted Leonsis.

  • Can you answer CQ’s political Trivia for November 16?

  • An RCN release announced, “RCN Corporation … will be a Corporate Partner of MLS Cup 2007, Major League Soccer’s Championship game between the New England Revolution and the Houston Dynamo, which will be held Sunday, November 18, at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C.”

  • “SAIS International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellows Libby Casey, a reporter with KUAC-FM in Fairbanks, Alaska; Eliza Barclay, a freelance print reporter in Mexico City; and Krista Kapralos, a reporter with the The Herald in Everett, Washington, will discuss their overseas reporting experiences. Members of the public should RSVP to IRP at irp@jhu.edu or 202.663.7726.”

  • Check out FNC’s Carl Cameron new blog from the campaign trail.

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press writes, “Nice Try, CBS, But Rather’s Lawsuit Has Merit”

  • The AP reports, “New York Times Co. said Friday its ad sales from continuing operations dipped 0.7 percent in October on softness in its publishing division. Total revenue from continuing operations edged up 1 percent.”

  • Matt Welch writes, “The funniest thing about anti-media activists — whoops, I mean “public interest groups” — is that their sky-is-falling brief against big media consolidation always (and I mean always) disintegrates on contact with what I like to call “personal experience.” As in, theirs. And mine.”

  • National Journal’s Bill Powers writes, “The leading candidate is a woman, and trailing her are a mixed-race man and a white man. Thus, the contest must be all about gender and race, right? Well, no. But that’s how the media coverage of the Democratic presidential race often reads.”

  • From Mike Allen’s Playbook, “The next time you stop by the White House press room, be sure to admire Julie Mason’s rocking ‘rocket-red’ ‘do. Ed Henry has a new 20-YEAR calendar. Playbook booked him for his birthday in 2009 – we were both open!”

  • Public Eye reports, “Game, set, match, asterisk. The contest/discussion about who or what will be Time’s ‘Person of the Year’ is over. It’s Steroids. Yesterday’s federal indictment of Barry Bonds only sealed the deal.”

  • Susan Katz Keating reports, “This just in… The New Republic is scrambling to fill ‘an immediate opening’ for an editor to run its fact-checking shop. What happened to the old fact-otum? Has the prior chief been banished in the wake of L’Affair Beauchamp? As you will recall, Scott Thomas Beauchamp, an Army private, created quite a stir with his wild stories of American soldiers misbehaving in Iraq. The stir became a scandal when it turned out the stories were fabricated. Now it looks as if TNR wants to make sure this type of thing doesn’t repeat itself.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes,Mimi Valdes Ryan has a tough job. On Nov. 5, she became the top editor of Latina, a magazine and Internet operation, which is run by Latina Media Ventures and caters to Hispanic women.”

  • TVNewser reports, “ABCNews.com Changes, Again”

  • The Huffington Post reports, “Why Does Fox News Favor Giuliani? Well, Lots Of Reasons”

  • Politico’s Ryan Grim looks into “The art of the leak”

  • Murdoch’s free WSJ.com could hurt parts of Dow

  • E&P reports, “It’s not often you see The New York Times’ editorial board joining forces with outsiders to promote political discussions. But that is just what the newspaper’s opinion-makers are doing through the ’10 Questions’ project, an online effort aimed at getting presidential candidates to answer YouTube-style questions chosen by online users.”

  • Guardian reports, “Gannett, the US newspaper chain, is to cut 45 jobs in the newsroom at its flagship title, USA Today. The paper will start with voluntary redundancies and then, if that doesn’t provide the full quota, it will demand mandatory redundancies.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Google Inc. made a big splash last week with its new software for cellphones. But that’s far from the limit of the Internet giant’s wireless ambitions — which could include running its own mobile network.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “A key U.S. lawmaker urged Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin to delay his plans for a Dec. 18 vote on a media-ownership rule change that would benefit Tribune Co. and News Corp.”

  • FT.com reports,Rupert Murdoch’s six children are getting an early Christmas present after the family trust Mr Murdoch controls sold more than $360m worth of News Corp shares. The cash pay-out follows a $600m bonanza received by the siblings in February — at the time the biggest distribution of Mr Murdoch’s fortune.”

  • B&C reports, “Former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.) will be the first presidential candidate to picket personally with Hollywood’s striking writers”

  • Lisa de Moraes writes, “David Letterman’s overall audience with reruns was on par with the previous week with original episodes — 4 million viewers. And he gained eyeballs in TV’s key demographic groups, including the Holy Grail — the 18-to-49-year-olds.”

  • CNBC reports, “A video made by the Writers Guild is circulating the web. As of now, it’s been seen 111,000 times on Youtube. It dramatically argues that the studios are cashing in on digital distribution and the writers aren’t getting a penny.”

  • Beet TV reports, “The Nielsen numbers for online traffic at newspapers, which came out yesterday, show a significant jump in unique visitors to the NYTimes.com for October.”

  • New York Post reports, “The lucrative business of selling Web ads has become so fragmented — and easy to do — that even Martha Stewart has thrown her hat in the ring by setting up an online advertising network.”

  • Reuters reports, “Leading European publishers are coming to terms with what teenage boys and men have known for years — the Web beats magazines in grabbing their eyeballs.”

  • Business Week reports, “IAG delivers precise data on which TV ads are resonating. Now it’s headed online”

  • Folio reports, “Time Warner’s third quarter numbers were released recently, and while overall revenues rose nine percent over same period 2006—despite revenue declines from AOL—Time Inc.’s revenues were flat.”

  • Bed Bugs Found in Fox News Channel Newsroom

  • Poynter Online Steve Outing reports, “This week I gave a presentation to one of Sandra Fish’s journalism classes at the University of Colorado, Boulder. (It was an overview of social media and citizen journalism initiatives). I hadn’t been in front of a bunch of college students in a while, so I took the opportunity for a quick news-consumption quiz. I did a pretty good job of guessing in my head beforehand what the responses would be, but my prediction proved a little off when it came to print editions of newspapers.” Check out the results here.

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “The New York Times Op-Ed page hasn’t been this hot in a long time. Now we are experiencing Columnist Wars, with Bob Herbert this week joining in a rapidly escalating battle between Paul Krugman and David Brooks – largely over an incident involving Ronald Reagan at a local fair over 27 years ago.”

  • Mother Jones reports, “With all the articles that have been written about the TV writers’ strike (how crappy the signs are, Eva Longoria’s strike breaking, neonatal guild members birthed onto the picket line, career-change opportunities for Hollywood hacks, and Dowd’s space filling), no attention has so far been paid to the real victims here.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Rupert Murdoch’s announcement this week that he expects to stop charging for access to the Wall Street Journal’s Web site is the latest example of a publisher giving up on the subscription-based business model — a significant shift in the evolution of online content.”

  • Fool.com reports, “Murdoch announced at a meeting of News Corp. shareholders Tuesday: ‘We … expect to make [WSJ.com] free, and instead of having 1 million [subscribers], having at least 10 [million to] 15 million in every corner of the earth.’”

  • Washington Post reports, “The District will have to renegotiate a proposed deal to bring broadcasting company Radio One to the city after D.C. Council members rejected a plan to give the developers city-owned land worth $6 million on which to build the project.”

  • B&C reports, “Veteran Fox News Channel critic Robert Greenwald (Outfoxed) opened a second front in his campaign against the top-rated cable news channel, this time aiming to get advertisers to drop their sponsorships.”

  • Wall Street Journal’s John Fund writes, “Lou Dobbs for President? Don’t laugh. After months of telling reporters that he “absolutely” would not consider leaving his highly-rated CNN show in which he crusades against free trade and illegal immigration, Mr. Dobbs posted a commentary on his Web site last week predicting a surprise new presidential candidate in 2008.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “CBS Corp., its chief executive and Chairman Sumner Redstone, said a lawsuit filed by former news anchor Dan Rather is an attempt to ‘settle old scores’ and should be dismissed because of its ‘far-fetched allegations.’”

  • AFP reports, “The emergence of ‘smartphones’ has put the Internet, music and videos in the palm of the consumer’s hand, but the technology will need a flow of advertising cash to reach its full potential.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “CBS Corp., owner of the most-watched television network, probably would take the biggest hit in a prolonged strike by TV and movie writers.”

    Jobs

  • The Magazine Group is looking for a Circulation Manager.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for an International Book Licensing Representative.

  • The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a Special Sections Editor.

  • International Center for Journalists is seeking a Training Editor — Persian.

  • Army Times Publishing Company is looking for a Reporter to cover Federal Government.

  • Maryland Beachcomber/Worcester County Times/Ocean Pines
    Independent is looking for a Paginator.

  • Worcester County Times is looking for a staff reporter.

  • National Public Radio is looking for an Editorial Director, NPR Digital Media.

  • Howard University is looking for a Director of Communications and a Publications Manager.

  • The Hill is looking for a Political Editor.

  • Edleman is looking for a New Media Account Supervisor.

  • BusinessWeek Magazine is looking for a Correspondent for business, money, policy and politics and a legal Correspondent.

  • Center for Independent Media is offering an Online News Fellowship

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.07.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Taryn Luntz is joining The Examiner to cover Virginia and business news from the Seattle Times where she has been covering Washington for the paper.

  • Jen Lash is leaving Roll Call to be the assistant editor for Architectural Lighting. Her last day is Sept. 7.

  • From an ABC release, “On the eve of General David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker’s highly anticipated testimony before Congress regarding the war in Iraq, ABC News will again examine how the Iraqi people and the country are faring in its sixth division-wide reporting effort, ‘Iraq: Where Things Stand,’” which will begin airing Sunday, September 9.

  • From a release, “Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu has become a sponsor of China’s first Global Business Journalism Program that launches on September 17 at Tsinghua University. The goal of this unique initiative, run by this prestigious university and the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), is to create a new generation of business journalists able to produce insightful, balanced coverage of China’s markets and the global economy.”

  • Can you answer today’s Political Trivia from CQ?

  • We hear that the RSVP’s closed on Thursday for the GQ party. One tipster says they had an overwhelming response, with Bloomberg levels of attempted pre-crashing.

  • From TVNewser, “Despite Email Protest, Felling Back On Joe”

  • La Plata’s Media Policy Limits Access

  • TVWeek reports, “When Fox Business Network launches Oct. 15 nationally, it will be part of a round-robin channel shift in New York, home of Fox News and the financial capital of the country. The repositioning will involve channels owned by NBC Universal.”

  • Poynter Online points us to “great online news and tools for reporters in the latest edition of SEJ’s Watchdog Tipsheet, which covers First Amendment issues for journalists who cover the environment.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN is opening political bureaus in several key states as the race for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations heats up. A CNN insider tells TVNewser the bureaus in Des Moines, IA, Manchester, NH and Columbia, SC are already operational. They are being staffed at CNN Newsource affiliates in those cities.”

  • SEJ Panel Aims to Get Scientists, Journalists Working Together

  • A NBC release announced, “‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams,’ iVillage.com and msnbc.com will join forces for a special series, ‘The Secret to Her Success.’ Beginning on September 10 and
    continuing throughout the week, ‘Nightly News’ will close the broadcast each evening with reports on four important topics (women’s health, work, finance and friendship), which will cross over to the far reaching online communities of iVillage and msnbc.com with additional reporting and components.”

  • C-SPAN’s Presidential Libraries: History Uncovered debates tonight. The first show is live from the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library. For more information, click here.

  • Amy Gahran tackles, “Conversational Journalism: Credibility Gained or Status Lost?”

  • From a release, “To celebrate its 25th anniversary on Sept. 15, USA TODAY is partnering with American University’s School of Communication on a series of free live events to be held Sept. 10 through Sept. 14. In addition, a special exhibition of 25 USA TODAY front pages will be exhibited in the Katzen Arts Center throughout the week.” Events include some impressive panelists, including Helen Thomas, Eric Lichtblau, Ken Paulson, Judy Woodruff and Bob Schieffer. From E&P: “Assessing ‘USA Today’ As 25th Anniversary Approaches”

  • A reader gives us more info on Nina Totenberg’s singing habit. She apparently “comes from a musical family and occasionally sings at events for NPR.” She even sang at her own wedding.

  • Politico’s Ken Vogel reports, “Bill O’Reilly blasts DailyKos as a ‘hate site,’ but according to a federal ruling released Tuesday, the popular liberal blog is as much a part of the media as Fox News when it comes to campaign finance rules.”

  • The Washington Blogger Meetup is September 19 at 7:00 p.m. at Regional Food and Drink. To RSVP “yes” click here.

  • “It’s almost fifty pages long, but well worth the read: a recent study by the Pew Research Center for People & the Press synthesizes 165 separate national surveys and finds that American news preferences have remained ‘surprisingly static’ over the last twenty years. Tucked behind this central conclusion, however, is a suite of more intriguing observations about readership and audience habits.”

  • Can Camera-Phone Journalism Thwart the ‘Rally Squad?’”

  • The Boston Herald reports that Bill O’Reilly ranks #24 in Harvard’s list of most influential alumni, beating out Sen. Ted Kennedy’s #28.

  • “Project Censored Releases Censored 2008 and its pick of the 25 most important under-covered news stories of 2006-07. … Project Censored will host the award winning authors of the Censored 2008 stories at the second annual Media Accountability Conference October 26-27 at Sonoma State University.” Conference info is available here

  • CNN HD Debuts

  • Can Camera-Phone Journalism Thwart the ‘Rally Squad?’” Journalists awarded second place in the online reporting category to Greenwire’s Michael Burnham, Kelly Thompson, Monica Trauzzi

  • From a release, “The 43-year-old Conservative Book Club has completed the acquisition of the American Compass Book Club. American Compass was launched three years ago as part of the Doubleday Entertainment family of clubs. Both clubs serve the philosophically conservative book-buying market. The combined clubs, which will operate under the Conservative Book Club name, will have a membership of more than 100,000. The deal was signed Tuesday in New York.”

  • A reader writes, “For the whiner complaining about the Sunday Source Perino thing, the SS goes to press on Wednesday. No way for them to see into the future.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNBC will air the first presidential debate to focus on economic issues.”

  • TVWeek reports, “Rejecting strong opposition from the cable industry, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin J. Martin is moving to require cable system operators to offer consumers both analog and fully digital signals for TV channels after the digital conversion, unless they provide a digital signal and converter box to every household.”

  • The Washington City Paper reports, “The Washington Post fails to complete background check on Shaw activist.”

  • Washington Post Executive Editor Leonard Downie to discuss the future of the news business at SPJ.

  • From a SPJ release, “Chicago Sun-Times columnist Robert Novak to discuss CIA leak, Scooter Libby trial. … Novak and former Time, Inc., editor-in-chief Norman Pearlstine will be on hand during the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference to discuss the ethical questions of journalists as central players in a criminal prosecution and scandal. As part of the discussion, titled ‘Watching the Watchdogs: Ethical Implications of the Entangled Roles of Journalists in the Scooter Libby Case,’ Novak and Pearlstein will explain how they handled the dual roles as witnesses and journalists and the lessons learned. The event takes place at 2:45 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW.”

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “Over the next week, much will be written, pro and con, about General Petraeus’s report on the progress of the ‘surge’ in Iraq and President Bush’s response. Since both men have pretty much already announced, or at least rehearsed, what they are going to say, the suspense is not exactly crippling. I’ll be writing more later, but for now I’d simply like to address the media’s responsibility to address, over the next few days, this key moment in our recent history with a steady gaze — which, as I will recount, was sadly lacking last winter in the weeks before the ‘surge’ was announced.”

  • Notions Capital reports, “After decades, Washington, DC public station WAMU-FM is sending Bluegrass and other local music programs into that ‘Lonesome Valley’ of HD Radio where there is no one to hear them. … The FCC only approved digital HD Radio multicasting on March 22nd, but National Public Radio (NPR) has been hot to trot since May 2001, even before the FCC adopted the iBiquity HD Radio standard. Public stations have used it experimentally since 2004. NPR stations are the white mice of HD Radio. NPR headquarters for HD was even named the NPR Lab.”

  • From David Adler, CEO and Founder, BizBash Media, “It has been 8 years since starting to raise the money to launch BizBash after leaving PRIMEDIA. I am so thrilled that we are publishing our biggest issue ever at 260 pages and and continue to be the largest internet source for event planners around the world. Next year we will publish more than 20 issues in 6 major market with Chicago launching in January.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jay Rosen writes, “the press is not capable of making an independent decision denying the president his spin zone with a dateline in Iraq. When the White House says we’re going, they’re going.”

  • TVWeek reports, “The staffs of weekday and weekend broadcasts of ABC’s ‘World News’ will be combined under ‘World News With Charles Gibson’ executive producer Jon Banner and senior producer Vinnie Malhotra, who will continue as executive producer of weekend editions of ‘World News.’”

  • “‘Writers @ Work: A Process Approach,’ a four-week online course first offered last fall by News University, Poynter’s distance learning program. It’s scheduled again this year for October 15 to November 9.”

  • US News & World Report photojournalist James Lo Scalzo, author of a soon-to-be published memoir, Evidence of My Existence, has created a multi media synopsis of the memoir.

  • The Bob Edwards Show produced by XM Satellite Radio won 1st place from the Society of Environmental Journalists in the Beat/In-Depth Reporting category for the documentary “Exploding Heritage.”

    Jobs

  • Hanley Wood, LLC is looking for an Assistant Production Manager.

  • U.S.News & World Report is looking for a Health & Medicine Reporter.

  • Ed2010 reports that “AOL Living, AOL Food, and AOL Stylelist are seeking fall interns to work up to 25 hours/week. … This paid internship requires that the candidate be enrolled in a degree-granting program, and interns can choose flexible hours based on class schedules. Please send resume, cover letter and clips to dori.fern@corp.aol.com.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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