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Posts Tagged ‘how to’

Earn $1 A Word And Up At This Health-Conscious Pub

EatingWell

EatingWell‘s editorial mission is to “deliver the information and inspiration people need to make healthy eating a way of life.” This popular pub features plenty of healthy recipes, science news and food writing that’s bound to get you hungry.

Nutrition pieces are always in demand, as are travel stories (as long as they have a clear health tie-in). New writers who manage to break into the book often establish fruitful relationships with the editors there:

The best place to break in is the front-of-book “FRESH” department, which focuses on trends in health, sustainability, foods and farming, with stories about people who are revolutionizing how we enjoy food. The editors would like to see more pitches for investigative pieces on nutrition, as well as stronger, science-based queries on food and sustainability. Rather than merely outline the latest study, writers should be able to make the data relevant through storytelling.

For editors contact info and more on what they’re looking for, read: How To Pitch: EatingWell.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Freelancing 101

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Freelancers: When Should You Leave A Client?

LifeAsAFreelancer

Becoming a freelancer after working full time at a more traditional job can be a daunting transition. You are suddenly forced to be your own boss, create your own schedule and hunt for clients yourself.

Although there are plenty of benefits to becoming a freelancer, one of the major downfalls is the lack of financial stability. And nowadays, there seems to be a constant battle between what you should be paid and what you’re actually getting:

The “I can get it cheaper mindset” seems more prevalent since the Internet boom. Clients see numerous listings for blog posts at “5 cents a word” or “$6 a page” or “$10 an hour.” So often they don’t realize how unrealistic these rates are once issues like research, interviews, deadlines — plus overall skill — are factored in. Graphic designer Lucy A. Clark feels you have to hold your ground. “Unless you can educate [potential clients] about what’s really involved, walk away,” she said.

To get more tips on freelancing, read: Pros and Cons of Life as a Freelancer.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Your Guide to Publishing Personal Essays

CraftPersonalEssays

Personal essay writing is all the rage right now. Every major publication online seems to have a “Life” or “Relationships” section. Some sites are entirely dedicated to narrative, first person stories (I’m looking at you, xoJane.com).

Writing about your own experiences can be a valuable exercise in turning observations into something meaningful. But everyone knows that sharing anything personal (let alone controversial) on the Internet can result in some ugly feedback:

If you publish your essay online, especially in a vociferous blogging community, be prepared for anything. I have been called irresponsible, a bully, mean-spirited, lazy and more. I have also been praised for my candor, my writing style and my sense of humor. Any time you publish your work, you open yourself up to criticism, but with the personal essay, criticism can cut deeper because it’s in response to your personal life. Learning how to cope with negative feedback is a constant practice, says Carinn Jade, blogger at Welcome To Motherhood. “I think 97 percent of my comments have been negative. If I’ve written a piece that’s a real trigger for me, I’ll really try not to read the comments.”

To get more tips on writing a great personal essay, read: You Life in 1,000 Words: The Craft Of Personal Essays.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Rebound After Your Story Has Been Rejected

KilledStory

Whether it’s in your love life or your work life, being told ‘no’ can sting. When an editor rejects your writing, it can feel like a personal attack — but it’s usually not.

Editors kill stories based on a number of reasons, such as timing issues or internal changes in the publication. In any case, it’s important to find out why your piece was killed and then move on:

Whatever you do, don’t be overly apologetic. You’ll only appear desperate and needy to the editor, which doesn’t bode well if you hope to work with him or her again. I learned the hard way that editors simply don’t have patience for it. Instead, thank them for the opportunity and assure that you’ll apply the lessons from the experience to future assignments. Regardless of the reason, it’s never easy dealing with the rejection of an assignment. But instead of getting emotional, wondering if you’ll ever be good enough, try being logical, suggests New Jersey freelance writer, Stephanie Auteri. “I like to remind myself you can’t make everyone happy and you can’t be the right writer for everyone.”

To hear more words of wisdom from veteran freelancers and editors, read: 6 Things to Do After Your Story Has Been Killed.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How to Find the Right Market for Your Work

right-market

There are so many outlets for freelancers to write for. From glossies to blogs to literary reviews, the choices are endless. So how can a writer decide who to pitch to?

In the end, it comes down to your style of writing and where you are in your career. In the latest Mediabistro feature, veteran scribes gave their advice on how writers can find the best readers and keep the assignments coming:

Successful freelancers, like any entrepreneurs, will tell you that repeat business is essential to furthering your career. Once you’ve established a connection with an editor, it’s much easier to pitch a new idea to that editor than to break into a new market. Koa Beck, EIC of Mommyish.com, gives an editor’s perspective: “Keep pitching and follow up. I receive so many pitches from good writers that aren’t a good fit for us, but that doesn’t mean I’m not interested in anything else you might come up with.” Personally, I often send two or three ideas in my follow-up pitch letters to demonstrate my expertise and willingness to write more on a topic. However, when I’m first contacting an editor, I typically only submit one very fleshed-out idea to make a good first impression.

For more advice on pitching, read: Finding The Right Market for Your Work.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.