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Posts Tagged ‘John Roberts’

Morning Reading List, 08.25.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 08.22.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 04.01.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Justice Alito’s bday, finally someone explains MoDo, Leon Harris likes baseball, The Deadline Club is out with its awards finalists, WRC’s Vickie Burns is heading to WNBC in New York, it’s the birthday of Redhead Fan Club favorite Jess Smith and don’t forget to not fall for April Fools jokes today.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Hillary vs. McCain…you think McCain will win.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “I’m angry because one of the finest, most talented journalists I’ve ever had the privilege to work with was forced to leave the paper last week. This senseless maneuver was attributed to flattening the management structure. I guess it’s OK to flatten structures, but when people get crushed in the process, that’s not OK”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • E&P reports, “The newspaper industry has experienced the worst drop in advertising revenue in more than 50 years. According to new data released by the Newspaper Association of America, total print advertising revenue in 2007 plunged 9.4% to $42 billion compared to 2006 — the most severe percent decline since the association started measuring advertising expenditures in 1950.”

  • Reuter’s Media File reports, “Former San Francisco Chronicle Editor Phil Bronstein has taken on a new role at parent company Hearst Corp. that will involve, among other things, finding ways to keep the news business viable at a time when most people have classified it as a dying industry.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. newspapers suffered their worst drop in print advertising sales since industry record- keeping began 57 years ago, hammered by the housing-market slump and competition from the Internet.”

  • Reliable Source reports, “For Washington VIPs, there were two hot tickets in town last night — not just an Opening Day seat at the new Nationals Park, but a coveted spot at the Lerner family’s pre-party, a little casual-dress affair for 800 of their closest friends. Folks like Michael Chertoff, Norah O’Donnell, Maury Povich and Connie Chung, MLB Commissioner Bud Selig and Japanese Ambassador Ryozo Kato. Pretty much any boldface name not preoccupied with a presidential campaign or the NCAA regional finals showed up at the team owners’ shindig on the top floor of a new office building two blocks from the stadium.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “Wall St. Journal Makes Politics Its Business”

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    TV

  • Politics benefits CNN.”

  • Rendell: ‘Fox Has Done the Fairest Job’

  • Kornheiser and Jaworski return to ESPN Monday Night Football

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN just announced that Wolf Blitzer’s day just got longer. Blitzer anchors a special Sunday night edition of The Situation Room at 8pmET ‘focusing on the presidential race’, said Blitzer during Late Edition. An interesting programming move considering this is the final day of March ratings and CNN holds a slim 1,000 viewer advantage over MSNBC in prime time (Mon-Sun, 8p-11p) in the key A25-54 demo.”

  • Media Post’s On Media reports, “Obsessing over Time Warner’s fate and fortune is a time-honored pursuit that usually ends with the same discouraging realization. Even after adding AOL, subtracting cable, tweaking filmed entertainment and contemplating an overall breakup, the $50 billion behemoth is a product of reactionary rather than visionary leadership-and is, at its core, a content company.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc., the world’s largest media company, must share control its Superman copyright with the heirs of the comic hero’s creator, Jerome Siegel, a federal judge ruled.”

  • TVNewser reports, “With April 16 marking his one-year anniversary as co-anchor of CNN’s American Morning, John Roberts is profiled by TV Guide. Asked by writer Stephen Battaglio about what he expects when AM gets a new executive producer, Roberts says, ‘We’ll take the opportunity to just tweak around the edges of the show. The show as it is right now is fairly heavily scripted. I think what we’re going to do going forward we’ll try to pare back the amount of scripting that we’ve got and introduce a little more of an ad lib aspect to it, which will make the show a little looser, a little more accessible…’”

  • A release announced, “CN8, The Comcast Network today announced its plans to provide extensive coverage of the critically-important April 22 Pennsylvania primary, offering comprehensive, interactive news and feature programming available on air, online and ON DEMAND throughout April. Unlike traditional networks which are sending teams to Pennsylvania, CN8 is already utilizing its more than 120 PA-based employees, its six studios across the state, and its dozens of hosts, contributors and political experts who cover Pennsylvania and presidential politics 365 days a year.”

  • TVWeek reports, “Media buyer ZenithOptimedia has lowered its forecast for U.S. advertising spending for 2008 as the effects of the housing crisis seep into the economy and consumer confidence droops. Zenith sees newspaper advertising taking a bigger hit while Internet spending grows even faster than previously expected. Overall, ad spending will rise 3.7% in 2008, said ZenithOptimedia, which in December had forecast a growth rate of 4.1%.”

  • TVNewser’s Gail Shister writes,Dave Marash, a recent exile of Al Jazeera English, says his new book ‘certainly won’t be a ‘kiss and tell,’ ‘cut and whine’ about his former employer. The ex-’Nightline’ correspondent confirms he’s close to a deal for ‘The World Really is Watching,’ (working title), an analysis of the planet-wide expansion of television news. He’s been mulling the topic for a while.”

  • TVNewser reports, “This Friday marks the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., and networks are set to mark the occasion in a variety of ways. CNN’s Soledad O’Brien anchors the special ‘Eyewitness to Murder: The King Assassination’ at 9pmET on Thursday. The special is the first in CNN’s Black in America series.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Arianna Huffington’s Dick Wiki

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Not much is booming in the American economy these days, but there’s a bull market in blame. All over the media, people are pointing fingers at those who supposedly got us into this mess. Some say that Alan Greenspan did it. Others fault, variously, President Clinton, President Bush, Congress, and, of course, Wall Street. And let’s not forget the foolish people who took out all of those crazy mortgages in the first place. But there’s one culprit the media don’t mention much: themselves. This is a little strange because the news business has become quite good at publicly whipping itself for all kinds of sins. Many outlets employ columnists whose sole duty is to scold colleagues for their errors.”

  • PressThink reports, “The Love Affair Between McCain and the Press Sprains the Brain of the Liberal Blogosphere”

  • The New York Times reports, “When Ms. Huffington, the 57-year-old author and former conservative pundit, announced her plans for The Huffington Post three years ago, many critics dismissed the idea as a digital dinner party for her new liberal friends. But it has grown in ways that few, except perhaps Ms. Huffington herself, expected.”

  • Wolf Blitzer, George Will, and other big names at Lerners party at opening night for Nats stadium, writes Harry Jaffe.

  • AdAge.com reports, “Reinforcing print publishers’ frequent assertions of relationships with readers, new research by MediaVest suggests that readers trust print more than the web in almost every area.”

  • USA Today reports, “Looking to snare a larger share of Internet ad dollars, traditional media companies are launching ‘vertical ad networks’ in which they sell ad bundles of space on their sites and on independent sites with complementary content. Forbes.com’s Business and Finance Blog Network, announced last week, includes more than 450 finance-focused blogs, such as Talking Biz News and Xconomy. Forbes will sell ad space across that network, earning a cut of the revenue from the sites.”

  • BBC launches redesign of its news site

  • TechCrunch’s Erick Schonfeld writes, “Six Months In, And 600 Posts Later … The Worlds Of Blogging and Journalism Collide (In My Brain)”

  • New York Times reports, “When Ms. Huffington, the 57-year-old author and former conservative pundit, announced her plans for The Huffington Post three years ago, many critics dismissed the idea as a digital dinner party for her new liberal friends. But it has grown in ways that few, except perhaps Ms. Huffington herself, expected.”

  • Innovation in College Media reports, “Journalism school graduates: How to increase your chance of finding a job and decrease your chance of having to vent on AngryJournalist.com”

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    MAGAZINES

  • MediaWeek.com reports,John Micklethwait, editor of the highbrow British news and opinion weekly The Economist, knew his magazine had solidified its place in the American culture when The Simpsons’ beloved, hapless patriarch paid homage in an episode. But the magazine’s recent business successes on these shores are anything but a joke. It has achieved impressive gains in ad business and readership and scooped up industry accolades (most recently, a National Magazine Award nom for General Excellence), even as much larger news and business titles wither and as a certain high-profile launch — one promising ‘business intelligence’ on the front of every cover — doesn’t look so smart after all.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Still on Ann S. Moore’s to-do list: trimming the portfolio of Time Inc. titles. That’s the impression she left with many staffers after a quarterly management meeting March 27. Ms. Moore, Time Inc.’s chairman-CEO, told top managers that she is still looking carefully at the portfolio of magazines so the company — the country’s biggest magazine publisher, with brands such as Time, Sports Illustrated and People — can focus on the titles best positioned for growth in print and online.”

  • Business Wire reports, “For the first time ever, global news and business bible The Economist shoots to the No.1 spot on AdweekMedia’s annual ‘Hot List.’ Released today, the highly anticipated ‘Hot List’ honors the publications and creative talents that keep consumers coming back to the newsstands. Leaping from its No. 10 rank last year, The Economist marks the biggest jump on the list and proves that news and business titles remain contenders in a market dominated by women’s lifestyle titles.”

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    JOBS

  • The Yomiuri Shimbun (Washington Bureau) is looking for a Reporter/Research Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.10.08

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    Good morning Washington. IT’S CHUCK NORRIS’ BIRTHDAY!

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The AP reports, “The Associated Press has named two veteran editors to leadership positions in a new regional editing operation for the Southern United States. Brian Carovillano, news editor for the AP in Northern California, has been promoted to the new position of regional editor for the South. And Oscar Dixon, a longtime sports editor with USA Today, has been named to the new position of assistant sports editor for the South region.”

  • An Examiner release announced, “Michael J. Barnum has been promoted to regional vice president of circulation for the Washington-Baltimore Examiner Newspaper Group. Barnum was circulation vice president of The Baltimore Examiner since shortly after launch in 2006.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Lots of Gridiron highlights!

  • Mortman on “What A [Expletive] Week It’s Been,” “A Glass-Enclosed Opinion Poll” and “[Expletive Deleted]?! Oh What The [Expletive Deleted]! My [Expletive Deleted] It Is!

  • The Examiner’s Bill Sammon interviewed at Gibraltar Associates’ Tarah Donoghue for his “3 Minute Interview.”

  • A reader writes in, “about the Natl Journalism Awards: the winner for Editorial Writing, Sonni Efron, is based in the LAT Washington bureau.”

  • Lone Post Calls Out Black Barack Attack

  • Bye, bye white hand.

  • From National Journal:

      So the Mike Huckabee press plane had a game: If you caught someone napping, you put a sheet of paper with a cute caption in front of him or her and took a picture. After much trying, participants finally snapped Huckabee last week, with the cutline: “If I close my eyes, it feels like Air Force One”

  • WWD.com reports, “Can glossy luxury supplements help save newspapers? The Wall Street Journal is about to find out. Days from now, the Journal will take prototypes for its upcoming quarterly glossy on the road, making a pitch to the coveted luxury advertiser resting on two major points: that the demographics of the paper are ripe for luxury marketers, and that new editor Tina Gaudoin possesses the experience and contacts to convincingly speak to the high-end audience.”

  • Chicago Tribune reports, “Niche pages with a targeted audience may be attractive in weak economy”

  • “On Monday, March 17, the Project for Excellence in Journalism’s fifth annual State of The News Media report will address this question and introduce original research on topics as far ranging as the economics of advertising to the impact of citizen media sites.” Check out the results here.

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    TV

  • Brian Williams Nudges NBC to The Top With A Light Touch

  • Ratings Retention Favors FNC

  • TV Puts an Odd Lens on Politics

  • A CNN release announced, “CNN’s political team will report from the CNN Election Center in New York and from the state of Mississippi for the Tuesday, March 11, primary. This special night of political coverage follows CNN’s March 4 ratings win and the network’s nine presidential primary debates, seven of which were among the most watched in cable news history. On Tuesday, March 11, lead political anchor Wolf Blitzer joined by anchor Campbell Brown will guide the network’s coverage in a special edition of Election Center from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Chief national correspondent John King will provide in-depth data using the CNN ‘multi-touch’ wall, and anchor Soledad O’Brien will report the exit poll data.”

  • Journalism in the Hands of the Neighborhood

  • TV’s election lessons.

  • Michael Getler’s ombudsman column for PBS.

  • Reuters reports, “A senior Democratic senator on Wednesday introduced a resolution aimed at overturning a decision by regulators that loosened media ownership restrictions in the 20 biggest U.S. cities.”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar reports, “Tucker To Journalist That Got Powers Fired: ‘It’s A Little Much Being Lectured On Journalistic Ethics By Someone From The Scotsman’”

  • The New York Observer reports,Steve Friedman, the legendary news producer who’s been known over the years to walk the hallways of the various morning news outfits at which he’s worked wielding a baseball bat, is starting his own media venture. On the same day CBS News announced that it was firing embattled Early Show executive producer Shelley Ross, Mr. Friedman (who, oversaw the Early Show prior to Ms. Ross’ arrival), publicly announced the plans for his new venture, a consulting company called Vir2L media.”

  • A reader writes in, “msnbc, at least on my tv at home, has been frozen for at least 20 minutes. no sound, just …a full screen of a graphic about the gop buying anti-obama web domain names.”

  • Tucker To Journalist That Got Powers Fired: ‘It’s A Little Much Being Lectured On Journalistic Ethics By Someone From The Scotsman’

  • A release announced, “AARP, the largest membership organization for people 50+, today announced the launch of AARP TV, a franchise that will create original lifestyle and news content catering to the boomer and 50+ demographic. AARP TV’s first two syndicated television shows—Inside E Street and My Generation—will debut on March 10 and 11, 2008, respectively and be distributed through and air on Retirement Living Television (RLTV) which reaches more than 29 million households nationwide. These two weekly half-hour shows extend from AARP’s lifestyle and news platforms as well as select single-topic specials.”

  • “Kimberly Dozier: I’ve Got to Make The Decisions For the Risks I Take

  • Check out B&C’s John Eggerton’s account of the Radio & Television News Directors Foundation dinner, where former CNN’s John Roberts cracked wise about Shelley Ross’ departure from CBS’ Early Show.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • An ABCNews.com release announced, “ABCNEWS.com achieved another record-breaking traffic month in February 2008. Last month, ABCNEWS.com again broke all previous site traffic records, reaching nearly 23 million uniques, an increase of 82% compared with the same time last year, according to ABC’s measurements. The site also garnered 202.3 million page views, up 45% from the previous year. In February, the site increased video views by 117% compared to the same time last year, according to ABC.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “The Financial Times has launched a Facebook application that will give students free access to FT.com. The free subscription offer will be available through an application available in college groups within the social networking website.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “High-tech signs to feature breaking news”

  • Fortune reports, “Increasingly, Web content sites are finding ways to organize and syndicate writers’ content — one even sends them a check up front.”

  • Reuters reports, “For CBS, raiding Silicon Valley for talent is the fastest way to lose its rep as your grandpa’s choice media company. CBS Interactive President Quincy Smith, himself a veteran dealmaker for tech and media companies with close ties to the west coast, has been poaching top tech companies for talent, particularly engineers, to build up its online offerings.”

  • WebProNews.com reports, “When it comes to trusting the press in general 54 percent of Americans say they do not trust them and 46 percent say they do not trust television while 41 percent say the do trust Internet news according to a new poll from HarrisInteractive.”

  • Adotas reports, “Developers just got a brand new toy, courtesy of AOL. The company today announced the launch of Open AIM 2.0, a product that allows developers to access the AIM instant messaging network faster and integrate AIM into their sites and applications in customizable ways.”

  • InformationWeek reports, “If you’ve had a creeping sense that wireless has become more integral to your working and personal lives, then Wednesday’s numbers from the Pew Internet Project will confirm it with hard numbers.”

  • Online Media Daily reports, “Google is not out to disintermediate advertising agencies, but it looks as if it has it’s heart set on disintermediating some other organizations that help agencies manage how they buy media. That was one of the takeaways from Google President-Advertising and Commerce, North America, Tim Armstrong during a keynote address Thursday at the American Association of Advertising Agencies Media Conference here.”

  • The New York Post reports, “The sprawling media-information company that Mayor Mike Bloomberg left behind is bracing for the worst in terms of a fiscal downturn. ‘The new top brass here are betting on a recession,’ said one insider, in a thinly veiled pot shot at Dan Doctoroff, the one-time economy czar in Bloomberg’s administration who last month was named president of Bloomberg LP.”

  • A reader points out, “minor note: your post.com hand post cites ‘campaign within washingtonpost.com’ … but the elevators travel 12 floors and there are a bunch of non-WPNI companies in the building.”

  • “Digg CEO Jay Adelson is calling this post ‘completely inaccurate’”

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    MAGAZINES

  • MinOnline reports, “Now that media conferences are in full swing, the question that keeps coming up is whether magazines are going the way of VHS and the horse and buggy. For John Squires, executive vice president of Time Inc, the answer was a resounding no.”

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    RADIO

  • NewsBusters: “NPR Favors Special Tax Breaks — For Its Own Headquarters

  • DCRTV spots a funny goof in the WaPo…

  • The AP reports, “CBS Radio is teaming up with AOL to provide online streams from all 140 of its stations to AOL’s online radio service. The deal announced Friday will bring news, sports and music programming from big CBS stations to AOL, including WFAN-AM and 1010 WINS in New York.”

  • AOL, CBS Team Up For Radio, Advertising

  • Mark Kaye spoke with Chris Core about leaving WMAL-AM, and “his past, present and future.”

  • From DCRTV:

      DCRTV hears from a reliable local sports source that Washington Post superstar sports columnist Tony Kornheiser (left) “will make it official” this month that he’ll be returning to his broadcast booth gig at ESPN’s “Monday Night Football.”

  • Invite more conservatives to NPR?

  • Barron’s reports, “Government approval for the pending merger of XM Satellite Radio (XMSR) and Sirius Satellite Radio (SIRI) ‘now appear less likely,’ Pacific Crest Washington analyst Erik Olbeter said in a research note this morning. Now 13 months since the original announcement of their plans to merge, Olbeter says that ‘prospects for the merger have become increasingly cloudy.’”

  • Journalist Perspectives on Five Years in Iraq

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    WEST WING REPORTAGE

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press seeks an APTN Newsperson for its Washington, D.C. operation.

  • The National Academies is looking for a Web Content Assistant: Writer.

  • The American Prospect is looking for a Staff Writer.

  • W*USA 9 News Now is looking for a Freelance Writer — Metromix.

  • Hanley Wood LLC is looking for a Senior Marketing Manager and a Senior Editor Online — Builder.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Editor, National Desk.

  • The National Academies is looking for a Media Relations Officer.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Editor, National Desk and a Digital Trainer, Digital News Desk.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.03.08

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    Good morning Washington. One year ago we said goodbye to Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. and AP said hello (again) to Ron Fournier. It’s the birthday of Alexander Graham Bell, Jessica Biel and, yes, me, which is the closest I’ll ever get to the lovely Biel. And to answer your questions: 1.) No, I don’t feel older, 2.) I was sick of my 20s anyway and 3.) A flat screen tv would be great, thanks.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • You think Willie Geist is hotter than Joe Scarborough.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Times reports, “It’s a bad day for those assigned to cover the Redskins on a daily basis — the team has parted ways with Chris Helein, the media relations chief since the summer of 2006.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Killing Competition Breeds New-Style Foreign Correspondents

  • The latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press shows, Barack Obama is riding high as the March 4 primaries approach. Obama has moved out to a broad-based advantage over Hillary Clinton in the national Democratic primary contest and holds a 50%-43% lead over John McCain in a general election matchup.”

  • On the Press Bus, Some Questions Over Favoritism

  • Gannett Blog reports, “Batting three for three, The Arizona Republic appears to be protecting another top Gannett executive from embarrassing online reader comments. The paper published its story about newly appointed newspaper division President Robert Dickey (left) — without allowing comments at the story’s end. Dickey, 50, the Republic’ s chairman, replaces retiring Sue Clark-Johnson, 61 — another former Republic executive.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “At the San Jose Mercury News, reporters have been instructed to wait at home on the morning of March 7. If they don’t get a phone call by 10 a.m. telling them that they’ve lost their jobs, they should head to work.”

  • The Crimson reports,Linda J. Greenhouse ’68, the New York Times reporter and former Crimson editor who has covered the U.S. Supreme Court for 30 praise-filled years, will retire from her beat, the newspaper confirmed yesterday.”

  • From a reader: “Here’s another one on everyone’s fave new media honco, Zell: If you look at the AP’s board of directors’ history, they hardly ever eliminate a Trib/NYT/WaPo member from their board, so Zell’s a shoo-in. If you were Ken Lowe/Gary Pruitt, would YOU piss off this man and vote ‘no?’ Me neither. When he visited the DC buros, I hear he had Randy Michaels, the up & coming CEO, in tow the whole time…”

  • Peggy Noonan on William Buckley.

  • The AP reports, “The Boston Globe says it plans to cut 60 jobs by offering voluntary employee buyouts. Publisher P. Steven Ainsley is telling staff that the buyout packages are a difficult but necessary step to lower costs and keep the business healthy. The plan is part of a broader cost-cutting effort.”

  • William F. Buckley’s Greatest Hits

  • The AP reports, “The New York Times Co. said Friday its January revenue from continuing operations dropped 5.5 percent, weighed down by a significant classified ad sales decline. The company, whose properties include The Boston Globe, International Herald Tribune and its namesake daily, said revenue from continuing operations slipped to $272.3 million from $288 million in the prior-year period.”

  • Newsday.com reports, “Newsday publisher Tim Knight Thursday announced that the newspaper will be cutting about 120 jobs throughout the company, citing declining sales and the ‘soft advertising revenue environment.’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “McClatchy Co., the newspaper publisher that paid $4.1 billion for Knight Ridder Inc. in 2006, wrote down the value of its publications for the second time in four months.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Harbinger Capital Partners NY LLC and its affiliate Harbert Management Corp. on Friday filed a proxy with the Securities and Exchange Commission to elect four directors to New York Times Co.’s board at the 2008 annual meeting, scheduled for April 22″

  • Regarding The New York Times, Jay Rosen asks Romenesko readers, “What were the editors thinking?”

  • StuffWhitePeopleLike has The New York Times at #46. “Mornings are exceptionally important to white people, as witnessed by their love of breakfast places. However, some white people never go out for breakfast on a Sunday Morning. The reason? The Sunday edition of the New York Times.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “‘The Chris Matthews Show’ was the number-two rated Sunday morning public affairs show tying CBS’s ‘Face the Nation,’ and topping ABC’s ‘This Week’ and ‘FOX News Sunday’ in households nationally for the week ending February 24, 2008.”

  • The Washingtonian asks “Who’s Really The Best Political Team in Television?”

  • And NBC announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the top rated Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, February 24, 2008 in all categories.”

  • Griffin Compliments Countdown Demo Win

  • C-SPAN 2 & C-SPAN Radio will air the election results at 7:30 p.m., pending the Senate schedule.

  • A CNN release announced, “On the heels of CNN’s ratings win for the month of February and the network’s nine presidential primary debates, seven of which were among the most-watched in cable news history, CNN’s political team will report live from the CNN Election Center and across the country for the Tuesday, March 4 primaries. Voters in Texas, Ohio, Vermont and Rhode Island will cast their ballots and CNN journalists and analysts will be on-hand to report the results and what it means for the remaining presidential candidates.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox & Friends saw double digit gains year-to-year. The 7-9amET morning show is up 22% in Total Viewers, averaging 953,000 viewers this month. CNN’s American Morning is up 13% from last year, and is averaging 469,000 viewers.”

  • Poynter Online reports,Terry Gross, the Peabody Award-winning host of the NPR talk show Fresh Air, is a guest voice — as herself — on The Simpsons airing Sunday, March 2 on FOX. Actor Topher Grace also makes a guest voice appearance in the episode.”

  • TVNewser reported that Megyn Kelly got married this weekend. Sorry guys.

  • The Washington Post reports, “The recently resolved Hollywood writers’ strike took its toll on local ratings during the February sweeps period that ended Wednesday. Prime-time ratings declined last month compared with the same period in 2007 for nearly all Washington stations, which because of the strike aired more reruns and reality programming. The dip in prime-time viewership in turn affected ratings for some of the station’s late-night and early-morning newscasts.”

  • TVNewser reports,Liz Cox Barrett writes in the Columbia Journalism Review about an exchange on Morning Joe Wednesday morning with Pat Buchanan and Joe Scarborough. Buchanan and Scarborough were discussing Sen. Hillary Clinton and the difference between her speech pattern and that of Sen. Barack Obama.”

  • Power Line reports, “The Times Goes Looking for Media Bias … Not, as you might expect, in the mirror. Instead, the Times pointed its finger at a television station in the Republican South. This is a spin-off from the recent 60 Minutes story that apparently claimed it was Karl Rove’s fault that former Alabama Governor Don Siegelman was convicted of bribery and mail fraud. I haven’t followed that story closely, assuming that it is another 60 Minutes hoax.”

  • Jeff Greenfield: Sunday Nights Live

  • Media Money reports, “Time Warner’s new CEO Jeff Bewkes just showed Wall Street that he means business about cost cutting and getting the company on track. He just made his first big move: consolidating Time Warner’s New Line studio into its separate and larger Warner Bros.”

  • FreePress.net reports, “We just caught Comcast Corp. stacking an FCC hearing with paid (and apparently sleepy) seat-fillers. The hearing was set up to investigate Comcast’s recent blocking of the Internet. But Comcast packed the room so that the public couldn’t get in to voice their support for Net Neutrality.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS’ Bob Schieffer is this year’s recipient of the Leonard Zeidenberg First Amendment Award. It will be presented to him by PBS’ Jim Lehrer at the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation’s First Amendment Awards Dinner next week in Washington, D.C. CNN’s John Roberts will emcee the March 6 event. Other award presenters are to include ABC News President David Westin and NBC Universal CEO Jeff Zucker.”

  • TVNewser has a round-up of the ratings and reviews from MSNBC’s Tuesday’s Democratic debate.

  • Washingtonian presents, David Simon Chats About The Wire’s Final Weeks”

  • His Extreme-ness says, “If you base fictional politicians on real-life politicians, are you allowed to flip-flop on the issues — just like the real guys do? Apparently so if you’re David Simon, creator of the mega HBO hit ‘The Wire.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • It was Karl Frisch’s 30th birthday on Saturday.

  • A release announced, “New America Foundation’s Next Social Contract Initiative and Pollster Cliff Zukin released new findings on how public opinion shapes national values and informs the potential for policy reform, particularly in the areas of health care, education, taxes and economic security.” Check out the report entitled “The American Public and the Next Social Contract: Public Opinion and Political Culture in 2007″ here.

  • FaithfulAmerica.org, now operated by Faith in Public Life, sent a letter individually signed by 9,000 people of faith to the polling directors at the media organizations that sponsor the presidential primary exit polls. The letter asks ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox and the AP to stop stereotyping people of faith by asking all voters — Republicans and Democrats — the same religion questions on the exit poll surveys. We expressed particular concern that Republican voters in every state have been asked if they are evangelical, while Democrats have not been asked if they are evangelical in a single state. Signatures are still streaming in at FaithfulAmerica.org.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “In the convoluted saga of Microsoft Corp. bidding to gobble up Yahoo Inc., speculation about News Corp. emerging as the white knight to rescue the beleaguered Internet giant refuses to die.”

  • Post I.T. writes,Craig Newmark seems pretty content with his business, the hugely successful craigslist.org. He hasn’t accepted any outside funding, has declined offers to buy the site, and he doesn’t have any big plans to change its formats or features. So why was Newmark one of the keynote speakers this morning at the Southeast Venture Capital Conference in Tysons Corner? ‘I’m a curiosity,’ he said, sounding somewhat baffled by the attention he’s gotten since launching the site in 1995. The product hasn’t changed much. He still lists free classified ads from all over the world, charging only for job listings in 11 major markets and for apartment listings in New York City.”

  • NMA reports, “Hearst Digital Network, the online division of the National Magazine Company, is to close a host of its magazine websites. The move is part of a rationalisation of the network’s key brands that will see it reduce its focus from 13 titles down to five. The four magazine sites being closed include Good Housekeeping and Country Living, which will be wrapped into a single portal, Allaboutyou.com.”

  • Portfolio reports, “TechCrunch is the talk of Silicon Valley. Now the founder of the blog talks about the battle between Microsoft and Yahoo, Barry Diller, and why he says Gawker Media’s Nick Denton is ‘amoral.’”

  • ClickZ reports, “Yahoo has started testing behavioral and geo-targeting across its growing network of newspaper publisher sites. A preview of its nascent display ad management platform and recent statements from Yahoo execs indicate the firm’s sales restructuring, newspaper consortium project and network ambitions are aligning.”

  • Reuters reports, “Nearly 70 percent of Americans believe traditional journalism is out of touch, and nearly half are turning to the Internet to get their news, according to a new survey.”

  • A release announced, “DCist.com is pleased to announce its second annual DCist Exposed Photography Show, in partnership with Civilian Art Projects, running March 7-15, 2008. 44 local photographers, both amateur and professional, were chosen out of over 250 who submitted their work for the show through the DCist Flickr site. Every day DCist.com selects photos from a user-generated Flickr photo pool to use in its daily coverage of local news, arts and entertainment, politics, food and sports.”

  • Eric Boehlert writes, “The press will torment Obama, too”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar talks to George Carlin and finds out he “Reads More Blogs Than You Do”

  • Wonkette reports, “Important New York Times editorial decisions
    New Republic Investigates NY Times Newsroom Politics Over Single Article, Again”

  • “Two thirds of Americans — 67% — believe traditional journalism is out of touch with what Americans want from their news, a new We Media/Zogby Interactive poll shows.

  • Mark Glaser writes, “Distinction Between Bloggers, Journalists Blurring More Than Ever”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Ten years ago, he was a reclusive, pasty-faced 31-year-old who, bashing away on his laptop in his grungy Hollywood apartment, shot to prominence when he threatened to bring down Bill Clinton’s presidency by breaking news of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Now, Matt Drudge owns a luxurious Mediterranean-style stucco house on Rivo Alto Island in Florida’s Biscayne Bay, a condominium at the Four Seasons in Miami and is said to drive a black Mustang. He remains an elusive, mysterious figure but the internet pioneer is arguably the single most powerful journalist — though his detractors even deny that is his occupation — in the world.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Some say that the media have fallen hard for Barack Obama. Others note that journalists once carried a torch for John McCain and may well do so again. Watch the coverage closely, however, and it turns out that the most powerful media bias in this campaign is not for a person but for a decade.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Nation’s Richard Kim writes, “I won’t attempt a grand summary of the late William F. Buckley’s legacy. The man was undeniably one of the great political forces of the 20th century — so too were Ronald Reagan and Milton Friedman. But in seeking to capture the scope of his influence, writers on the left have taken to applauding Buckley’s ‘brilliance.’”

  • On Buckley, Slate’s Timothy Noah writes, “Why we should be (mostly) glad that he outlived his brand of conservatism.”

  • Slate’s Michael KinsleyOn Intellectual Honesty Bill Buckley had it, journalism should strive for it, and politics needs more of it.”

  • Yale Daily News reports, “William F. Buckley Jr. ’50, whose penchant for the pen beginning in his earliest years at Yale popularized the conservative movement and transformed a generation of American politics, died Wednesday at his home in Stamford, Conn. He was 82.”

  • DMNews.com reports, “In an effort to heighten brand awareness of its online and print magazine titles, Hearst Magazines Digital Media will participate in Yahoo Buzz. Yahoo Buzz allows readers to vote on the popularity of online stories. Yahoo then posts the winners on its homepage. Hearst has signed on ten of its titles, including Esquire, Cosmopolitan and Redbook, as Buzz content partners.”

  • The Progressive announced that they have added two new columnists: “Dave Zirin, who delves into the politics of sports, and Jim Hightower, the great—and funny—Texas populist.”

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    RADIO

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News journalists Larry Abramson and Marisa Penaloza have been honored by the Education Writers Association with its ‘National Award for Education Reporting’ in the radio category for a year-long NPR on-air and online series following a Baltimore-area high school’s efforts to improve student achievement.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “Conservative talker Laura Ingraham gave her a big break, and now former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright wants her own radio show. ‘I think it would be so much fun,’ she tells us. ‘I love talking, listening, and asking and responding to questions.’ Albright was recently on Ingraham’s show talking up Sen. Hillary Clinton when she felt the urge to have the mike to herself. ‘I like to be provocative and like to be provoked,’ she says. ‘Having been on many radio shows, I know they provide great opportunities to learn about many different subjects and allow you to have fun while doing it—all without having to put on makeup!’”

  • Radio Ink reports, “XM Satellite Radio CEO Nate Davis this morning detailed some cost-saving changes his company is making to its marketing strategy, and also revealed how he’s working with Apple to make XM programming more accessible to iPod users.”

  • Reuters reports, “XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc and Sirius Satellite Radio Inc have extended by two months a deadline to potentially terminate without penalty Sirius’s year-old proposed acquisition of its bigger rival.”

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    JOBS

  • Army Times Publishing Company is seeking Deputy News Editor for Navy Times and Navytimes.com.

  • Eurasia Group is seeking an Editor.

  • Liberty University is looking for a Promotional Copywriter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for an Assistant Documents Editor.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for an Editor.

  • MarketWatch is looking for a Financial Regulation & Housing Reporter.

  • The Humane Society of the United States is seeking an Associate Editor.

  • Carroll County Times is looking for a Features reporter.

  • Citigate Cunningham is looking for a Director of Technology Public Relations and an Account Manager for Technology Public Relations.

  • National Federation of Independent Business is looking for a Web Communications Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.15.08

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington. It’s the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Wikipedia. (See King’s Wikipedia entry here.)

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think Hillary Clinton was “edgy” on “Meet”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Washington Business Journal reports, “Gannett Co. Inc. has named the chief executive of online ad company PointRoll Inc. to be its new chief digital officer, as it seeks to expand its online operations. Chris Saridakis, who was named PointRoll chief executive after McLean-based Gannett acquired the company two years ago, will oversee digital operations at Gannett’s newspapers and television stations. He will report directly to Gannett chief executive Craig Dubow.”

  • J. Peter Freire is the new Managing Editor of The American Spectator. Freire first came to the Spectator as an intern and editorial assistant under a journalism fellowship from the Intercollegiate Studies Institute.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The real Dowd scandal

  • Washington Post’s Deb Howell writes, “Here’s what happened in New Hampshire: Reporters lost their natural skepticism and took what they thought was happening and projected it far past the facts. The experts were wrong, the polling a disaster. The Post, luckily, didn’t poll late in New Hampshire and wasn’t among those making a bad call.”

  • The Virginian-Pilot’s Joyce Hoffman writes, “Coming on board as public editor with the news that Landmark Communications, and with it The Virginian-Pilot, is likely to be sold is a daunting endeavor. An end to the century-old tradition of leadership by a family with a historic commitment to public service journalism is a troubling prospect for Hampton Roads.”

  • Richard Just writes, “What happened at the Supreme Court 20 years ago tomorrow has been long forgotten by most Americans — if they ever heard about it at all. Unlike the better-known decisions of the last century, the ruling handed down on Jan. 13, 1988, had nothing to do with race or abortion rights. It didn’t become fodder for presidential candidates and hasn’t galvanized voters on either the left or right. Yet over the past two decades, the court’s ruling in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, which concerned high school newspapers, has had far-reaching consequences. Not only has it changed the way journalism is taught at many schools, it has made it more difficult for high school students to learn the important lessons about democracy that come from publishing — or simply reading — serious newspapers.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “MSNBC presents special live coverage
    … of the Michigan primary, as well as the Democratic presidential debate live from Nevada. Coverage begins with ‘Hardball with
    Chris Matthews’ live from Las Vegas at 5 and 7 p.m. ET, ‘Tucker’ live at 6 p.m. ET and ‘Countdown with Keith Olbermann’ at 8 p.m. ET.”

  • A CNN release announced the network “will dedicate the 8 p.m. hour each weekday to the latest election news coverage from the campaign trail in a new program, CNN Election Center. Building on CNN’s successes and ratings wins from both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primaries, CNN Election Center will be anchored by members of the ‘Best Political Team on Television’ from the New York-based CNN Election Center and on the trail by CNN anchor John Roberts.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Broadcasting & Cable published an editorial today that served as a call to the networks to focus more energy on presidential news coverage. It also applauded ABC News for its debate coverage, which rated extremely well, and its New Hampshire special, which didn’t, but was the only network that gave the primary a half-hour.”

  • The Washington Times reports, “A legal battle over advertisements for a new documentary about Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton illustrates the folly of current campaign-finance laws, says the attorney for the producers of the film, which premieres tonight in Washington. ‘Hillary: The Movie’ is ‘a political documentary like Michael Moore or Al Gore has made,’ said James Bopp, who went to federal court last week to represent the movie’s producers. Yet the conservative group Citizens United, which produced the Clinton film, must ‘go to court to get permission to advertise the film… because of McCain-Feingold,’ he said.”

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “If you saw John Kerry on ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ Sunday morning, you saw him talking about his endorsement of Barack Obama. And you probably also saw him successfully pull off a tough stunt — banning something he didn’t want from the show.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Rep. Ron Paul took part in last Thursday’s GOP debate on Fox News after being excluded in the New Hampshire forum. His supporters were, well, less than happy with Fox News over the decision to leave out Paul from the N.H. forum, as Frank Luntz explained.”

  • TVNewser reports that MSNBC announced in a press release how it plans to handle hosting a debate and covering the Michigan primary tonight. The debate will take place at 9 p.m.
  • PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler writes, “The press, the pundits and the polls all got a big black eye this week after forecasting, with considerable certainty, a big victory for Sen. Barack Obama in the Democratic primary in New Hampshire. Much has already been written and broadcast about this episode. Newspapers and television networks have had stories about how everybody got it wrong and what the various reasons may have been. I don’t have much to add to this other than to wonder if individual news organizations — aside from their obvious, next-day follow-up stories — took some time to conduct their own in-house post-mortems to figure out if this glaring error in polling and news judgment should alter in some fundamental way the manner in which they approach political coverage. It’s not as though it hasn’t happened before.”

  • This Wednesday at Nathan’s Q&A cafe will feature Amy Holmes, described as “a three-fer: female, black and republican. There’s not much we won’t be able to politically slice and dice.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Hotline’s On Call is covering the Michigan primary live tonight.

  • Poynter’s Steve Klein reports, “No one has been more supportive of bloggers and more critical of mainstream media than Ted Leonsis, the former AOL executive who owns the NHL Washington Capitals. (OK, well maybe Mark Cuban is close.) Leonsis has paid to send independent bloggers to cover Caps prospects in Russia, and when long-time Washington Times hockey writer Dave Fay died late last year, no one was kinder. So when Leonsis shelled out $124 million over 13 years last week to keep his franchise player, Alex Ovechkin, in town — it was the biggest contract in Washington D.C. sports history — Leonsis had a right to expect some accurate coverage in the MSM and some honest passion from the bloggers. But to read the owner’s very active blog, Ted’s Take, it doesn’t appear he got a great deal of either.”

  • Christopher Hitchens Watch reports that Hitchens has quit smoking. No, really.

  • Be sure to c heck out Breitbart TV. Ed Driscoll reports, “About a minute into the latest B-Cast by Liz Stephans and Scott Baker of Breitbart.TV (whom we interviewed a few weeks ago on PJM Political), they casually mention that their previous show attracted about 400,000 views.”

  • Marc Fisher reports, “Living in a city without a full-time jazz station, I have to rely on CDs and downloads to hear my fill of Miles Davis and John Coltrane. But to discover new jazz from singer Madeleine Peyroux or pianist Bruce Barth, it’s necessary to reach past broadcast radio to online music services, music blogs and pay satellite radio. But now comes NPR Music, a sprawling Web site from National Public Radio on which I can listen to the NPR jazz (or classical or folk or indie rock) shows that don’t air on Washington’s public stations — as well as tap into song lists, video and audio of concerts, music-related stories from NPR’s news shows and a raft of programs from public stations across the country.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Wonkette reports, “Campaigns & Elections magazine was one of those old insider trade magazines for people that simply couldn’t get enough of campaign tactics and other campaigners in the off-season — but there’s nary an off-season anymore. So, C&E redesigned the magazine (it’s shiny!), started writing about politics and threw a swanky party with an open bar in a big black room to celebrate.” For pics, click here.

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    RADIO

  • Former CBS Public Eye editor Matthew Felling is hosting “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today at noon on WAMU 88.5, talking Macs and Movies.

  • The Redskins’ Tumultuous Season Didn’t Gain Yardage on Sports Radio

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    JOBS

  • CommunicationWorks is looking for a Media Manager.

  • mediabistro.com is looking for mediabistro.com Instructors.

  • Widmeyer Communications is looking for an Account Manager and a Senior Associate/Assistant Vice President.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Technology Writer.

  • WTOP Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • WFED Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • AARP is looking for a Managing Editor — AARP Bulletin.

  • SourceMedia is looking for a Reporter, The Bond Buyer/Washington Bureau.

  • Strauss Radio Strategies, Inc. is seeking PR Pros Specializing in Broadcast.

  • Youth Today is looking for a Publisher and a Managing Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • New “American Morning” Team Starts Today

    Best of luck to CNN’s John Roberts and Kiran Chetry

    John Roberts To (Largely) Remain In D.C.

    (via TVNewser)

    CNN’s John Roberts, the new co-host of “American Morning,” will co-anchor the the show “from both New York and Washington, D.C.”

    Taking Out The Trash, 01.03.07

  • You occasionally use WikiPedia.

  • Yikes, are things really this ugly over at Fox News?

  • Check out the Post’s Blogger Summit.

  • Saddam: CNN #1 After Execution

  • How to pitch NPR’s Morning Edition.

  • ABC Radio is looking for a staff writer.

  • NPR Digital Media is looking for an online producer.

  • More jobs.

  • And employers: Find your freelancers here.

  • Check out the Tyndall Report.

  • Rachel Sklar on Cohen v. Copeland.

  • USA Today’s David Lieberman wonders if the Politico will be 2007′s top new success.

  • Over at NewAssignment.net, however, Steve Fox thinks it will struggle.

  • One reader thinks that CNN’s Soledad O’Brien needs a refresh course on DC geography.

      FishBowlDC should invite Soledad Obrien from CNN to town for a tour of the city. This morning prior to throwing to Wolf Blitzer and his special situation room for coverage of the Ford funeral she would see cars moving on the monitor and say that the motorcade was arriving at the Capitol. Once I think some cars were driving up, but it wasn’t the motorcade. The second time, the cars were pulling up in front of Blair House – not the Capitol. It took a few beats for her co-anchor, I think it was John Roberts, to say that he thought it was over by the White House, but neither one came up with Blair House. So give Soledad a tour of DC. Or beg CNN to stop letting her talk about DC. She just isn’t familiar.

    >UPDATE: Another tipster reads the above and writes in: “I don’t think some of these people got enough love from their mommys when they were babies.”

  • Kevin Sullivan, on being Bush’s top PR guy.

  • Howie Kurtz’s online chat yesterday.

  • Tom Shales on Ford funeral coverage.

  • Will Bill Keller End ‘Public Editor’ Slot at The Times?” And, if so, will other papers follow?

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