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Posts Tagged ‘Josh Fruhlinger’

Morning Reading List, 03.30.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You laughed at Karl Rove. Not with him.

  • An NBC release announced that “Meet The Press with Tim Russert” won the week ending March 25 in all categories, both nationally and in Washington, D.C. “Meet” attracted 44% more viewers than CBS “Face the Nation,” 66% over ABC “This Week” and 248% more than FOX “News Sunday.”

  • Michael Getler didn’t love the “News War” finale.

  • Rachel Sklar has a “Dispatch From The ASNEs.”

  • From a reader: “Don’t ask why I remember this, but I recognize that NYT photo from the Kyle Sampson story: it’s from a Kit Seelye article from winter 2003ish about snowmobilers in Yellowstone.”

  • Another NBC release announced that “The Chris Matthews Show” was “the number-two rated Sunday morning public affairs show for the week ending March 25, 2007.”

  • The Pew weekly News Interest Index shows that while public interest in the Iraq war remained high last week, the fallout from the firing of eight U.S. attorneys by the Justice Department “failed to gain much traction with the public.”

  • Cousin TVNewser reports that David Gregory, and Don Imus had a friendly debate over which really is the number one nightly news show.

  • The AP reports, “Traditional media are seen to be fighting an uphill battle against Internet news and citizen journalists, despite questions over the credibility of the Web.”

  • Media Matter reports that Drudge has linked “to Politico 45 times during its two-month existence.”

  • Jay Rosen reports that Tim Porter and Michele McLellan have “change or die” findings from their tour of American newsrooms.

  • Paul Bedard reports that Bernadine Healy was giving her future son-in-law a hard time at her book party on Tuesday for his dangerous habit — rugby.

  • The Washingtonian’s write-up of last night’s Media Research Center awards gala.

  • BBC reports, “Among those calling for a bloggers’ code of conduct is Tim O’Reilly — one of the web’s most influential thinkers.”
  • Huffington Post’s Ankush Khardori asks, “Do Newspapers Need Ombudsmen?”

  • Poynter released the results of the EyeTrack07 study this week to the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Check out the results here. E&P has more on the study.

  • TVNewser reports, “ABC’s Chief White House Correspondent Martha Raddatz reported from the North Arabian Gulf on Wednesday, where she was the only Western journalist aboard the USS Eisenhower.”

  • Jonathan Chait, the new author of TRB, “talked with TNR Editor Franklin Foer about the role of a column and the challenges of writing one.”

  • From Cynopsis:

      Discovery Communications yesterday announced it would buy the 25% ownership stake in Discovery held by Cox Communications in exchange for $1.275 billion in cash, and the Travel Channel and its related business pieces. It is likely Cox will spin the network and put it up for sale. The end result for Discovery is it will now be owned by Liberty Media with a now 66% stake, and Advance/Newhouse with 33% ownership. The deal is expected to close in early third qtr 2007.

  • Theodora Blanchfield has been promoted from staff writer to Associate Editor at Campaigns & Elections magazine

  • IANS reports, “The murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl in Pakistan will be the subject of an investigative journalism seminar being planned by Georgetown University’s School of Continuing Studies.”

  • “The Loudoun Times-Mirror was honored March 24 as the best weekly newspaper in Virginia for its circulation size.”

  • Salon’s Rebecca Traister takes a look at Fox’s “Conserva-babe and star-in-the-making Rachel Marsden.”

  • Check out the 2007 RTNDA Regional Murrow Award recipients, including two awards for WTOP.

  • The Washington Times reports, that House lawmakers “said they are committed to a Feb. 17, 2009, deadline for transitioning to digital TV.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc. will offer international news from reporters working with U.S. newspaper publisher McClatchy Co., including a blog written by Iraqi staffers, the companies said on Wednesday.”

  • The AP is looking for a photographer in the Baltimore bureau.

  • E&E Publishing is seeking a Production Assistant for E&ETV.

  • No-Va Living Magazine is seeking a freelance Statistician/Researcher.

  • And we have some photos from the Week Opinion Awards:
      Bill_Falk_Chip_Bok_Michael_Kinsley_and_Josh_Fruhlinger.jpg
      Bill Falk, Chip Bok, Michael Kinsley and Josh Fruhlinger

      Bill_Falk_Justin_Smith_Terry_McAuliffe.jpg
      Bill Falk, Justin Smith and Terry McAuliffe

  • And more:

    cbn1.JPG
    (L to R) Rhoda Glickman, former Deputy Chief of Staff, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and Beth E. Dozoretz, Senior Vice President, Value Options Healthcare join iVillage (a division of NBC Universal) President, Deborah Fine, Benita Fitzgerald Mosley, President of Women in Cable Telecommunications and Phyllis E. Greenberger, President and CEO, Society for Women’s Health Research in Washington D.C. for an advisory board meeting to launch iVillage Cares, a new national women’s advocacy program.

    cbn2.JPG

    (L to R) Benita Fitzgerald Mosley, President of Women in Cable Telecommunications, Phyllis E. Greenberger, President and CEO, Society for Women’s Health Research, Patricia de Stacy Harrison, President and CEO, Corporation for Public Broadcasting join iVillage (a division of NBC Universal) President, Deborah Fine in Washington D.C. for an advisory board meeting to launch iVillage Cares, a new national women’s advocacy program.

  • Mediabistro Course Management 101

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    The post Featured Post appeared first on MBToolBox.

    Taking Out The Trash, 03.20.07

  • Picking the next president is easier than picking the NCAA College Basketball Champ.

  • NPR Files For Streaming-Royalty Rehearing

  • Michael Murphy joins Fox News Channel’s Washington bureau as the Senior Manager of Media Relations. He was formerly an account supervisor at Ketchum Public Relations in DC.

  • Congrats to The Hill for scoring some front-page love on last night’s Colbert Report.

  • Crawling through commercials at MSNBC

  • Dear Author.com reports that Sterling Publishing’s Union Square Press imprint will be putting out a book titled “The United States v. I. Lewis Libby” in April. “The book will be edited by investigative journalist Murray Waas of the National Journal.”

  • Sometimes you just can’t win…First, they’re a “GOP Shrill” then “It’s Unanimous: All Dem-Friendly Stories This Morning at The Politico.”

  • From a tipster: “Just noticing that ABC has item about 1984 ad, something reported in the Washington Times a week ago.”

  • Huh? What is this website all about?

  • Howard Kurtz reports, “Fifteen percent of stories on the network evening news in each of the last two years were reported by minorities, an all-time high that is more than double the level of 1990.” Women reported 28 percent of the pieces, just under the high-water mark of 29 percent set in 2002.

  • Is washingtonpost.com “spraying bullets“?

  • From a tipster: “There’s a new Jeff on K Street. Patch beats Birnbaum to the (same) story … by six days. Who’s editing In The Loop?! “Retailers, Banks Duke It Out Over Transaction Fees” – Jeff Patch, The Politico (March 14, 2007) “Retailers, Credit Card Companies Quibble Over Footing The Bill” – Jeffrey H. Birnbaum, The Washington Post (March 20, 2007) )”

  • The AP reports that “about one-third of the people living in the national’s capital are functionally illiterate, compared with about one-fifth nationally, according to a report on the District of Columbia.”

  • Cathy Seipp’s daughter, Maia, informs Seipp’s blog readers of her current condition.

  • CBS Leans On Sources & ‘Our Partners At Politico.com’ To Say Gonzales Is A Goner

  • Roll Call made its own March Madness fun, matching each school in the NCAA tourney with its Representative. They will fill in the winners as the tournament progresses.

  • Wolf Blitzer drives himself to work!

  • E&P reports that despite the toll the Iraq War is taking on papers, “top news outfits, from The New York Times to Associated Press, remain committed to covering the war, with no immediate plans for cutbacks.”

  • If FNC & CBC Partner For Debates… Will We See A ‘Massive Grass-Roots Backlash?‘”

  • The AP has a piece on NBC and ABC Iraq correspondents Richard Engel and Terry McCarthy, both of whom have been covering the war since the beginning. “This week their respective networks will be showcasing their work, which has included dodging bullets and escaping carjackings while trying to hold onto a personal life at home.” (via Eat the Press)

  • Over the weekend, Slate points out that The Post apparently isn’t much fond of firearms. In a recent piece by Paul Duggan on the overturned ban on handguns, there are phrases like “lawsuit that gutted the District’s tough gun-control statute,” “recruited a group of strangers to sue the city and bankrolled their successful litigation” and even the headline refers to the “lawyer who wiped out [the] D.C. gun ban.”

  • Who will win the “I’m Not A Political Genius But I Play One On TV” award?

  • Washington Whispers reports that Scott McClellan “is shopping a book proposal around and hopes to land a deal this month.” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is also writing a book on his roots and his start in Washington. And… former Sen. Fred Thompson is planning more fundraisers for convicted perjurer Lewis “Scooter” Libby. “Friends say it will help him show conservatives that he not only believes in the Bush team but is not a fair-weather friend.”

  • National Journal’s Andrew Noyes reports that C-SPAN “recently decided after some haranguing to expand access to its repository of footage from congressional hearings, federal agency briefings, and White House events.”

  • Washington Whispers also reports, “White House spokesman Tony Snow, takes a center-stage role in PBS’s two-hour special, The Boomer Century 1946–2046, on March 28. It will show three pics of Snow: as a kid, playing his rock flute, and dressed up as the prez’s spokesman.”

  • In DCist’s opinion, 94.7 “the Globe” is “not half bad.”

  • Acorn Media Group, “a leading independent global media company,” announced in a release that Miguel Penella is taking over as the new Chief Executive Officer effective April 1.

  • TVNewser reports that David Bloom’s wife, Melanie Bloom, spoke to MSNBC’s Chip Reid yesterday about her husband’s work and his untimely death.

  • A reader offers his take on the hot (or lack there of) D.C. journos:
      That’s somewhat ridiculous! There are literally thousands of working journalists in the D.C. area. To assume that not one of them — I’m referring to girls here, since that’s my particular focus — isn’t “hot” is just a ridiculous generalization. The short answer is “yes.” In fact, there are “hot,” or attractive, women at small local papers in the suburbs, at papers in the Baltimore area, at papers, radio stations, television stations and internet sites throughout the D.C. area, and at many of the bureaus of the larger national publications in those offices at the National Press Building. There are attractive women at newsletters, publishers, p.r. firms, lobbying firms, marketing firms, and whatever else type of journalism office you can name. All you need to do is head out to social events (not even the high-end glitzy ones — those are bogus) such as happy hours, get-togethers, parties and Press Club functions, and you’ll see that there are literally plenty of attractive single women in journalism throughout the Baltimore and D.C. metropolitan areas.

  • Gawker’s “ThemTube: Spinning Tucker’s Bow Tie

  • In addition to losing some comics from the Post, DCist reports, “There’ll be a few other changes, too, including the removal of some panel cartoons in favor of others and the tossing-in of six-days-a-week Scrabble Gram and Stickelers puzzles.”

  • DCeiver exposes the Washington Post’s sports bias.

  • Annual Opinion Award Winners

    FishbowlDC to happy to report the winners of The Week magazine’s annual opinion awards:

    Columnist of the Year: Michael Kinsley, The Washington Post

    Editorial Cartoonist of the Year: Chip Bok

    Blogger of the Year: Josh Fruhlinger (wonkette.com) & Michael Totten (michael.totten.com)