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Posts Tagged ‘Ken Paulson’

Gannett Names President & Publisher of USA Today

Gannett has just named David Hunke president and publisher of USA Today. Craig Moon retired from the position this month.

In a release, Gannett chairman Craig Dubow says, “Dave is a highly talented, multi-faceted leader, who drives excellence throughout his organization while making the tough business decisions. At the same time, he has the courage to be innovative and take chances. He is just the right person for USA TODAY at this juncture.” Hunke was the CEO of the Detroit Media Partnership and publisher of the Detroit Free Press.

Today Hunke also announced his replacement for the paper’s editor– John Hillkirk, who is currently the paper’s executive editor.

This announcement fills a position vacant for months at USA Today. Hillkirk replaces Ken Paulson who left in February.

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Morning Reading List, 12.19.08

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Good morning, Washington. What DC street is featured above? Think you know? Email us with your best guess. AND: Join us after the jump to find out if you guessed our last contest correctly.

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Morning Reading List, 09.09.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 10.25.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • McDonalds is King.

  • One picture you won’t see in the soon-to-be-reopened Newseum: Al Neuharth dressed as Jesus Christ.”

  • The Baltimore Business Journal reports, “The Federal Communications Commission has fined Sinclair Broadcast Group $36,000 for failing to tell viewers that the federal government paid a conservative pundit for the commentary he made on a Sinclair-aired program.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Last week, Stephen Colbert in his eponymous avatar as a nincompoop right-wing talk show host, went on ‘The Daily Show With Jon Stewart.’ Amid a hail of blow kisses, he said he was mulling a run for leader of the free world and 15 minutes later on ‘The Colbert Report,’ he declared, ‘I am doing it!’ A trip to the altar of the Sunday morning talk show seemed like the next beat in the joke, which arrived on schedule … when Mr. Colbert appeared on ‘Meet the Press.’”

  • MinOnline reports, “300 entries from 138 magazines have been narrowed down to 21 top covers for this year’s ASME Best Cover Contest. There are three finalists for each of the seven categories. The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, GQ, and New York Magazine led all entrants with two finalists each. Below are listed the categories and finalists. … The winners will be announced at this year’s American Magazine Conference, October 28-30, in Boca Raton, FL.”

  • New York Times reports, “Bolstered by lower printing costs and strong movie and fashion advertising, The New York Times Company yesterday reported a small but increased third-quarter profit.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “The Clintons learned the importance of knowing how to take a punch, but more essentially, they learned how to change the subject and how to selectively use the White House megaphone to drown out negative stories.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “The new new new Journalism thrives on the new anxiety in journalism: avoiding redundancy.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Internet radio webcasters are hoping a Senate hearing … will renew legislators’ interest in their negotiations with the recording industry over royalty fees.”

  • Robert Bluey reports, “Washington Examiner senior White House correspondent Bill Sammon has some good advice for bloggers: quit the naval gazing and start reporting.”

  • End of the line for the Economist?”

  • Perino on the benefits of global warming

  • Mitch Pugh, editor of the Sioux City Journal, issues a public “Mea culpa” to USA Today’s Ken Paulson.

  • Music man Josh DuLac gets tutored by other music men.

  • Mixed Media reports, “Things I Learned About Stephen Colbert …watching Frank Rich interview him at the 92nd Street Y.”

  • After Sunday’s debate, FOX News announced the network received almost 50,000 viewer text message votes for the winner of the debate.

  • Politics and Prose announced they have a new General Manager. “Michael Link, our general manager for the last three years, has moved to Cincinnati to work as a marketing manager for Joseph Beth, a midwestern chain. We all hated to see him go, but now we have a wonderful new general manager to take his place, Tracey Filar Atwood.”

  • A Zogby poll shows, “Fifty-two percent of cable subscribers said they would prefer to buy individual channels, while 35% favor the current bulk package system.”

  • Merle Jacobs has resigned from the Washington Times copy desk and joins the Washington Examiner.

  • Save the Date! Tuesday November 13th, 2007 is the 1 Year Anniversary Party for Pamela’s Punch.

  • 60 years of VIPs for ‘Meet’ anniversary

  • The New York Times reports, “Google, which dominates the market for advertising on the Internet, seems to be hoping to do the same thing on television. The company is set to announce a partnership … with the Nielsen Company, the voice of authority in measuring television audiences, that will give advertisers a more vivid and accurate snapshot than ever before of how many people are viewing commercials on a second-by-second basis, and who those people are.”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Today the New York Times carried a page one report — linked, naturally, by Drudge — which breathlessly reported how Drudge was now in league with Hillary Clinton as well as various shadily-portrayed Republican operatives. Being chums with Drudge, the piece suggests, is the route to victory in 2008.”

  • Mass Inc. reports, “Young Americans are embracing new media but failing to develop an appetite for news”

  • Robert Bluey announced, “My New Job as Editor of Heritage.org”

  • A tipster tells us, “The Grosvenor who bought American Heritage is the same family whose name adorns the Grosvenor Metro station and Grosvenor Lane.”

  • Detroit Metro Times editorializes, “I had dinner the other night with a fine reporter and writer who works in another city where I was once a consultant. She loves what she does, and is good at it; she covers community news and sports. She has done this all her life, and still enjoys it. But she is now 48 years old and is a little concerned about security. That’s because she makes … $28,000 a year. That’s enough to make me pray daily that all the executives of every large newspaper company, but especially Gannett, get some terrible skin infection that isn’t covered by health insurance. What makes me maddest is not that they aren’t paying this poor woman even half of what she is worth.”

  • SAJA announced, “As part of their mission to encourage in-depth coverage of South Asia and the South Asian Diaspora, SAJA & SAJA Group Inc are pleased to announce a call for submissions for its third Annual SAJA Reporting Fellowships (SRF). Open to freelancers and staff journalists in any medium, the fellowships are meant to encourage in-depth reporting projects by providing grants to cover a portion of reporting expenses.”

  • JibJab is launching a new section of the website tomorrow called “JibJab Sendables”. “JibJab Sendables is our effort to reinvent online greetings (which, by any standards, are lame).” Check it out here.

  • “Carl Bernstein: Hillary Will Continue Bush’s Legacy of Secrecy,” writes Jon Wiener.

  • From Drudge Report, “According to notes from CNN’s Monday news meeting network president Jon Klein tells employees to use the California fire tragedy to ‘push’ their ‘Planet in Peril’ special, but warns reporters not to ‘irresponsibly link’ the fires to ‘Global Warming.’”

  • New York Times reports, “To some within the neoconservative movement, the announcement of John Podhoretz as the next editor of Commentary magazine — the same job his father, Norman, held for 35 years — is the best of all possible choices. It is a model of what Adam Bellow (son of the Nobel-winning novelist Saul) called the ‘new nepotism,’ combining the ‘privileges of birth with the iron rule of merit.’”

  • Poynter reports, “Gannett launches Center of Excellence call centers”

  • E&P’s Pauline Millard writes, “The Online News Association conference closed last Friday and most of the 600 participants left Toronto with some new ideas and pockets full of business cards. One thing I noticed at the awards banquet was how much amazing journalism is being done on the web — and how little of it gets acknowledged outside of these industry events.”

  • The Federal Election Commission is meeting this morning to review federal election law compliance issues for XM Satellite Radio’s POTUS’08 channel. The commission will also review a notice of proposed rulemaking for bundled contributions, and release a policy statement making permanent a program for probable cause.

  • FishbowlNY reports, “MarketWatch Turns 10″

  • Standard & Poor’s reports, “Blogs–especially the big-name brands such as TechCrunch, Gawker, GigaOm, Boing Boing, and the Huffington Post–appear to have attractive business models. This is good news for traditional media companies that are being marginalized online and off, and are hoping to catch up to–and cash in on–a rapidly evolving Web 2.0 world.”

  • Folio asks, “The Eternal Question: Is Print Dead? Heck, No!”

  • Financial Times reports, “E.W. Scripps likely to review newspaper assets in Q308; trust structure does not preclude sale options.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Tribune Co. reported third-quarter profit that fell less than analysts estimated, easing investor concern that Sam Zell will have trouble financing an $8.2 billion buyout of the second-biggest U.S. newspaper publisher.”

  • USA Today reports, “People in the know are really digging Digg. Digg leads the pack among the new and increasingly popular social-media websites. Like competitors Del.icio.us, StumbleUpon, Reddit and others, Digg lets users vote on what its community should be reading.”

  • The Media Mob reports, “Yesterday’s news that Us Weekly blogger Noelle Hancock (a former Observer staffer) is jumping ship to the soon-to-relaunch PageSix.com got us thinking about what the Post’s plans are for the new Web site. … However! A quick glance at the Nielsen/NetRatings stats for the past three months shows that the only site that’s shown growth is People.com, which had 6.5 million unique U.S. visitors in September, up by more than 1.5 million since July.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “The Financial Times will allow users following a link from Google to access one FT.com story without affecting their quota of free stories or requiring registration.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc. has been slow to react to sweeping changes in Web consumer behavior and online advertising shifts, but it is picking up its pace, its top executives said on Tuesday.”

  • Machinist writes, “Why I miss the dead-tree newspaper: I can skim the print version of the New York Times in a half-hour. You can’t do that online!”

  • TVNewser reports, “Former NBC News boss Neal Shapiro is joining the board of Gannett, owner of USA Today and about a hundred other newspapers/websites. Shapiro, who left NBC in 2005, is president of New York’s WNET.”

  • Blogging from her book tour for the Huffington Post, Valerie Plame Wilson responds to criticism about her book from right-wing blogs.

    Jobs

  • The ABC News Political Unit is now seeking three full-time spring interns in Washington, D.C. “If you write well, don’t mind getting up early, and have some familiarity with web publishing, send a cover letter and resume to teddy.davis@abc.com as soon as possible, with the subject line: ‘INTERN’ in all caps. Please indicate in your cover letter the dates of your availability.”

  • U.S. News & World Report is looking for an Assistant Managing Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.08.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • This is a close one, but you would rather marry a hot poor person over an ugly millionaire.

  • “Lynn Cheney Profiled by CBS Reporter Whose Husband is Her Literary Rep

  • It was one year ago last week that R.W. Apple passed away.

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, September 30 in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.”

  • We reported that Brian Dufffy left USNews. As of October 1, Duffy joined join NPR News as Managing Editor.

  • A look at Washington’s Onion office.

  • O’Reilly Lets Loose: Says WH Reporters Need To Be ‘Wiped Out,’ Calls CNN ‘The Pagan Throne’

  • More changes, Radio One to pull the plug on Syndication One

  • Pepsi, erectile dysfunction and ‘MTP?’

  • Ouch. O’Reilly on Scarborough: “Nobody watches Scarborough. He’s like a test pattern.”

  • Robert Novak, Washington Post Chairman Donald Graham, and other jurors and judges give their perspectives on jury duty, October 18, 6 p.m. at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1313 New York Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. This public forum is produced by Council for Court Excellence.”

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is continuing its series with Presidential candidates. Last week, Dennis Kucinich was featured. Coming up this week, Mike Huckabee, Ron Paul and John McCain.

  • The Congressional Black Caucus Political Education and Leadership Institute (CBC Institute) announced that “a date has been set for a Democratic presidential debate in Myrtle Beach, SC. The debate will be held on the evening of January 17, 2008 and will be produced and broadcast by CNN.”

  • In a release, the American Civil Liberties Union “applauded the Senate Judiciary Committee’s passage of S. 2035, a bill that would give stronger legal protection to journalists and their sources by lessening the chance that they will be arrested or intimidated for their reporting, particularly when using government sources. The legislation shifts authority from the Department of Justice to the federal courts to decide when journalists must disclose information to the government.”

  • Press Gazzette reports, “AOL UK is planning to outsource some editorial operations to India as part of cutbacks that could halve the number of editorial staff at the web portal’s London newsroom, according to insiders.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The National Association of Broadcasters, seeking to prevent legislation requiring payment of new music royalties by radio stations, asked Congress to investigate the relationship between artists and labels.”

  • Media Week reports, “U.S.News & World Report has launched a new companion Web site that leverages the magazine’s America’s Best franchise. The new site, RankingsandReviews.com, is geared for consumers looking for information prior to making major purchase decisions, such as buying a new car or a digital camera.”

  • AP reports, “Luring new readers means connecting with them on the Internet through blogs, live online chats and interactive databases, industry leaders told newspapers editors Thursday.”

  • E&P reports, “Even as the Olympics pushes ad spending worldwide next year, newspapers’ share of the global advertising market by 2009 will decline to 26.2% from 29.0% in 2006, according to a study released Thursday by the international ad agency ZenithOptimedia.”
  • Mediabistro got NPR’s Adam Davidsonto describe the behind-the-scenes challenges and rewards of chasing international stories for radio.”

  • Mediabistro also spoke to Ken Sunshine’s “about how he’s forged his business by fusing celebrity representation with political interests, and why he doesn’t shy away from tangling with the tabloids.”

  • Where does your favorite pub fall in the Newsprism?

  • Variety reports,Don Imus’ long-rumored return to the radio dial seems to be quickly coming to fruition. The impending deal appears to rule out any potential move to satellite radio. Sirius Satellite Radio chief Mel Karmazin indicated over the summer that he, too, would be interested in doing a deal with Imus.”

  • FT.com reports, “Peter Chernin has been Rupert Murdoch’s right-hand man for more than a decade. … In a video interview with FT.com, Mr Chernin talks about the threat from Facebook, News Corp’s $5bn acquisition of Dow Jones and its Wall Street Journal newspaper and the outlook for the US economy.” For highlights, click here.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. shares will reach $700 by the end of next year as the company lures more users to its YouTube video site and companies shift advertising spending to the Web, Bear Stearns & Co. said.”

  • Mediabistro turns 10!

  • Ken Paulson, editor of USA TODAY, has been named a Fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists; “this is the highest honor SPJ bestows upon a journalist for extraordinary contributions to the profession. Also named are Carl Bernstein, Muriel Dobbin, and John Markoff.”

  • Public Eye reports, “Okay, first things first: This space is going to be a ‘cackle’-free zone. No poking fun at irrelevant personal characteristics or foibles. At least not this week. That’s why this writer didn’t pick up on the ‘Chucklegate’ story yesterday, which referenced ‘The Daily Show’ and Jon Stewart. I’m just not going there.”

  • The AP reports, “Five journalists who covered the most tumultuous of 20th Century times are being honored by the Postal Service. These distinguished journalists risked their lives to report the events that shaped the modern world,” said Postmaster General Jack Potter, who announced the stamp series at the Associated Press Managing Editors Meeting in Washington Friday. The stamps are due out next year”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The Cleveland Plain Dealer is bemused — and frustrated — that presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich seems to be freezing out his own hometown newspaper.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “what’s amazing is how little effect the original O.J. story and its spawn — Anna Nicole Smith being the latest — have had on the serious business of serious news.”

  • RTNDA reports, “The young journalists are bringing a great deal of skill to the newsroom but often give the impression they think a diploma proves they’ve learned all they need to know about the craft.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Today’s Hardball news had us wondering about the show’s EP-less status. Sources tell TVNewser the search continues with a candidate identified, but no announcement is imminent.”
  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “‘The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers’ was Thomas Jefferson’s motto. Drew Curtis shares the sentiment to the extreme in his splenetic takedown of the press, It’s Not News, It’s Fark: How Mass Media Tries To Pass Off Crap As News, which came out late last spring.”

  • Public Eye reports, “You ever have a conversation where you thought afterwards, ‘I wish that had gone a bit better.’ Maybe after a date, or a job interview? According to Matt Elzweig’s new piece for the New York Press, New York Times Magazine writer Deborah Solomon has had that thought. And she decided — on at least two occasions — to change her weekly Q-and-A to be the conversation she wished she’d had.”

  • USA Today reports, “As channel choices and technological options have expanded, fewer of us are watching the same shows at the same time on the same day. And it’s increasingly affecting the national conversation.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc would be worth far more to shareholders if it broke up its Internet businesses or embarked on a major overhaul, including a departure from Web search, but management is unlikely to do either, according to an analyst note issued on Friday.”

  • Chris Matthewstalks about his fascination with politics and his trademark style of rapid-fire questioning” on NPR.

  • ABC News presents a new slideshow: Politicians Behind Bars.

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. online advertising spending topped $5 billion in the second quarter, a record for a three- month period, signaling that more advertisers are abandoning newspapers and television.”

    Jobs

  • Washington Life Magazine is looking for an Executive Assistant.

  • Cambridge University Press is looking for a Trade Sales Representative.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Director of Operations

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a part time News Assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.07.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Taryn Luntz is joining The Examiner to cover Virginia and business news from the Seattle Times where she has been covering Washington for the paper.

  • Jen Lash is leaving Roll Call to be the assistant editor for Architectural Lighting. Her last day is Sept. 7.

  • From an ABC release, “On the eve of General David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker’s highly anticipated testimony before Congress regarding the war in Iraq, ABC News will again examine how the Iraqi people and the country are faring in its sixth division-wide reporting effort, ‘Iraq: Where Things Stand,’” which will begin airing Sunday, September 9.

  • From a release, “Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu has become a sponsor of China’s first Global Business Journalism Program that launches on September 17 at Tsinghua University. The goal of this unique initiative, run by this prestigious university and the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), is to create a new generation of business journalists able to produce insightful, balanced coverage of China’s markets and the global economy.”

  • Can you answer today’s Political Trivia from CQ?

  • We hear that the RSVP’s closed on Thursday for the GQ party. One tipster says they had an overwhelming response, with Bloomberg levels of attempted pre-crashing.

  • From TVNewser, “Despite Email Protest, Felling Back On Joe”

  • La Plata’s Media Policy Limits Access

  • TVWeek reports, “When Fox Business Network launches Oct. 15 nationally, it will be part of a round-robin channel shift in New York, home of Fox News and the financial capital of the country. The repositioning will involve channels owned by NBC Universal.”

  • Poynter Online points us to “great online news and tools for reporters in the latest edition of SEJ’s Watchdog Tipsheet, which covers First Amendment issues for journalists who cover the environment.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN is opening political bureaus in several key states as the race for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations heats up. A CNN insider tells TVNewser the bureaus in Des Moines, IA, Manchester, NH and Columbia, SC are already operational. They are being staffed at CNN Newsource affiliates in those cities.”

  • SEJ Panel Aims to Get Scientists, Journalists Working Together

  • A NBC release announced, “‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams,’ iVillage.com and msnbc.com will join forces for a special series, ‘The Secret to Her Success.’ Beginning on September 10 and
    continuing throughout the week, ‘Nightly News’ will close the broadcast each evening with reports on four important topics (women’s health, work, finance and friendship), which will cross over to the far reaching online communities of iVillage and msnbc.com with additional reporting and components.”

  • C-SPAN’s Presidential Libraries: History Uncovered debates tonight. The first show is live from the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library. For more information, click here.

  • Amy Gahran tackles, “Conversational Journalism: Credibility Gained or Status Lost?”

  • From a release, “To celebrate its 25th anniversary on Sept. 15, USA TODAY is partnering with American University’s School of Communication on a series of free live events to be held Sept. 10 through Sept. 14. In addition, a special exhibition of 25 USA TODAY front pages will be exhibited in the Katzen Arts Center throughout the week.” Events include some impressive panelists, including Helen Thomas, Eric Lichtblau, Ken Paulson, Judy Woodruff and Bob Schieffer. From E&P: “Assessing ‘USA Today’ As 25th Anniversary Approaches”

  • A reader gives us more info on Nina Totenberg’s singing habit. She apparently “comes from a musical family and occasionally sings at events for NPR.” She even sang at her own wedding.

  • Politico’s Ken Vogel reports, “Bill O’Reilly blasts DailyKos as a ‘hate site,’ but according to a federal ruling released Tuesday, the popular liberal blog is as much a part of the media as Fox News when it comes to campaign finance rules.”

  • The Washington Blogger Meetup is September 19 at 7:00 p.m. at Regional Food and Drink. To RSVP “yes” click here.

  • “It’s almost fifty pages long, but well worth the read: a recent study by the Pew Research Center for People & the Press synthesizes 165 separate national surveys and finds that American news preferences have remained ‘surprisingly static’ over the last twenty years. Tucked behind this central conclusion, however, is a suite of more intriguing observations about readership and audience habits.”

  • Can Camera-Phone Journalism Thwart the ‘Rally Squad?’”

  • The Boston Herald reports that Bill O’Reilly ranks #24 in Harvard’s list of most influential alumni, beating out Sen. Ted Kennedy’s #28.

  • “Project Censored Releases Censored 2008 and its pick of the 25 most important under-covered news stories of 2006-07. … Project Censored will host the award winning authors of the Censored 2008 stories at the second annual Media Accountability Conference October 26-27 at Sonoma State University.” Conference info is available here

  • CNN HD Debuts

  • Can Camera-Phone Journalism Thwart the ‘Rally Squad?’” Journalists awarded second place in the online reporting category to Greenwire’s Michael Burnham, Kelly Thompson, Monica Trauzzi

  • From a release, “The 43-year-old Conservative Book Club has completed the acquisition of the American Compass Book Club. American Compass was launched three years ago as part of the Doubleday Entertainment family of clubs. Both clubs serve the philosophically conservative book-buying market. The combined clubs, which will operate under the Conservative Book Club name, will have a membership of more than 100,000. The deal was signed Tuesday in New York.”

  • A reader writes, “For the whiner complaining about the Sunday Source Perino thing, the SS goes to press on Wednesday. No way for them to see into the future.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNBC will air the first presidential debate to focus on economic issues.”

  • TVWeek reports, “Rejecting strong opposition from the cable industry, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin J. Martin is moving to require cable system operators to offer consumers both analog and fully digital signals for TV channels after the digital conversion, unless they provide a digital signal and converter box to every household.”

  • The Washington City Paper reports, “The Washington Post fails to complete background check on Shaw activist.”

  • Washington Post Executive Editor Leonard Downie to discuss the future of the news business at SPJ.

  • From a SPJ release, “Chicago Sun-Times columnist Robert Novak to discuss CIA leak, Scooter Libby trial. … Novak and former Time, Inc., editor-in-chief Norman Pearlstine will be on hand during the 2007 SPJ Convention & National Journalism Conference to discuss the ethical questions of journalists as central players in a criminal prosecution and scandal. As part of the discussion, titled ‘Watching the Watchdogs: Ethical Implications of the Entangled Roles of Journalists in the Scooter Libby Case,’ Novak and Pearlstein will explain how they handled the dual roles as witnesses and journalists and the lessons learned. The event takes place at 2:45 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6 at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., NW.”

  • E&P’s Greg Mitchell writes, “Over the next week, much will be written, pro and con, about General Petraeus’s report on the progress of the ‘surge’ in Iraq and President Bush’s response. Since both men have pretty much already announced, or at least rehearsed, what they are going to say, the suspense is not exactly crippling. I’ll be writing more later, but for now I’d simply like to address the media’s responsibility to address, over the next few days, this key moment in our recent history with a steady gaze — which, as I will recount, was sadly lacking last winter in the weeks before the ‘surge’ was announced.”

  • Notions Capital reports, “After decades, Washington, DC public station WAMU-FM is sending Bluegrass and other local music programs into that ‘Lonesome Valley’ of HD Radio where there is no one to hear them. … The FCC only approved digital HD Radio multicasting on March 22nd, but National Public Radio (NPR) has been hot to trot since May 2001, even before the FCC adopted the iBiquity HD Radio standard. Public stations have used it experimentally since 2004. NPR stations are the white mice of HD Radio. NPR headquarters for HD was even named the NPR Lab.”

  • From David Adler, CEO and Founder, BizBash Media, “It has been 8 years since starting to raise the money to launch BizBash after leaving PRIMEDIA. I am so thrilled that we are publishing our biggest issue ever at 260 pages and and continue to be the largest internet source for event planners around the world. Next year we will publish more than 20 issues in 6 major market with Chicago launching in January.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jay Rosen writes, “the press is not capable of making an independent decision denying the president his spin zone with a dateline in Iraq. When the White House says we’re going, they’re going.”

  • TVWeek reports, “The staffs of weekday and weekend broadcasts of ABC’s ‘World News’ will be combined under ‘World News With Charles Gibson’ executive producer Jon Banner and senior producer Vinnie Malhotra, who will continue as executive producer of weekend editions of ‘World News.’”

  • “‘Writers @ Work: A Process Approach,’ a four-week online course first offered last fall by News University, Poynter’s distance learning program. It’s scheduled again this year for October 15 to November 9.”

  • US News & World Report photojournalist James Lo Scalzo, author of a soon-to-be published memoir, Evidence of My Existence, has created a multi media synopsis of the memoir.

  • The Bob Edwards Show produced by XM Satellite Radio won 1st place from the Society of Environmental Journalists in the Beat/In-Depth Reporting category for the documentary “Exploding Heritage.”

    Jobs

  • Hanley Wood, LLC is looking for an Assistant Production Manager.

  • U.S.News & World Report is looking for a Health & Medicine Reporter.

  • Ed2010 reports that “AOL Living, AOL Food, and AOL Stylelist are seeking fall interns to work up to 25 hours/week. … This paid internship requires that the candidate be enrolled in a degree-granting program, and interns can choose flexible hours based on class schedules. Please send resume, cover letter and clips to dori.fern@corp.aol.com.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext