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Posts Tagged ‘Ken Walsh’

Morning Reading List, 12.06.07

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Good morning Washington. On this day in 1877, the Washington Post rolled out its first paper (via MicCheck). And it’s the birthday of The Hill’s Hugo Gurdon.

But first, our occasional “Sentence Only The Style Section Could Write”: “How come snow never is what it is? It’s always something else: magic, hassle, politics.”

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • When you are 50, you want to be anywhere but here.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Tribune Takes FCC Waiver Decision to Court

  • L.A. Times To Partner With Mixx Of McLean

  • Wonkette reports, “Old man Politico sure is concerned about those Hill staffers not getting their holiday parties, what with damnable new ethics laws poisoning the egg nog. Le sigh. But hey, who are those sexy looking ‘staffers’ in the accompanying photo? Whaddayaknow, it’s Nick Lachey and Vanessa Minnillo at last year’s MTV New Years Party!”

  • The AP reports, “Shares of New York Times Co. rose Tuesday after an analyst said he expects management’s turnaround initiatives to start to bear fruit next year.”

  • The Guardian reports, “The Times board, which approves the appointment of a new editor, is set to meet next week – fuelling speculation that James Harding is about to replace Robert Thomson in the top editorial job at the paper.”

  • Today, Politico’s John Harris moderates an Early State Countdown Panel with Des Moines Register’s David Yepsen, New Hampshire Union Leader’s Andrew Cline, Las Vegas Sun’s J. Patrick Coolican, The (Columbia) State’s Lee Bandy, and Politico’s Roger Simon and Jeanne Cummings. For more info, click here.

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    TV

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ won the November 2007 sweep in total viewers and in the key demographic adults 25-54.” For the sweep, “Nightly News” averaged a 1% advantage over ABC’s “World News with Charles Gibson” and a tremendous 37% lead over CBS “Evening News with Katie Couric”. “NBC has now placed first for 32 of the last 35 sweep periods, and the last six consecutive November sweeps.”

  • A reader notes, “That kathleen matthews’ smiling face still graces the main entrance billboard to 1100 Wilson Blvd.
    I thought I read in fishbowl she was leaving!” Funny, we asked about this a year ago.

  • Tonight, CNN will air the first ever live award show broadcast, “CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute” at 9:00 p.m. Hosted by Anderson Cooper and Christiane Amanpour, the show will include performances from Mary J. Blige and Sheryl Crow and a duet by Grammy Award winner Norah Jones and acclaimed performer-producer Wyclef Jean.

  • Multichannel News reports, “The Discovery Channel is cable subscribers’ favorite channel, but the channel with the highest perceived value by consumers is ESPN2, according to a Beta Research study released Dec. 4.”

  • AJR reports, “Today’s network newscasts aren’t as retro as the conventional wisdom would suggest.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “When New York Times executive editor Bill Keller sent out a Nov. 28 memo announcing the layoffs of a dozen Times employees, one detail attracted little attention outside the newsroom: The paper would be eliminating a legendary Times institution, the Recording Room.”

  • The AP reports, “New York Times Co. said Wednesday it expects revenue in November to rise 1 percent to 2 percent.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Washington Post reports, “Revolution Health Network has invested in two new Web sites, expanding its Internet audience to 12 million unique visitors a month as it seeks to challenge WebMD. Revolution said it acquired HealthTalk, a site devoted to patients with chronic conditions, and invested in SparkPeople, which offers diet ideas, exercise plans and advice. Financial terms were not disclosed.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “For years, media and technology companies have been ensnarled in a battle over the rights to video posted online. Now ratings giant Nielsen wants to be the policeman. Nielsen is rolling out a new service that aims to ensure that video is distributed and viewed on the Web only in ways sanctioned by its owners.”

  • Slate points out, “The sincerest form of flattery … From the WP on Nov. 29: ‘If an irony falls in the primary and there’s no late-night comic to tell a joke about it, did it really exist?’ From today’s NYT: ‘If Rudolph W. Giuliani’s campaign falls in a forest of bizarre mayoral accounting practices, but nobody hears about it on late-night television, does it make a sound bite?’”

  • Mark your calendars. The December Washington Blogger Meetup will be Wednesday, December 19 at 7:00PM at Regional Food and Drink.

  • A CQ release announced, “Eric Pfeiffer will write a regular blog for CQ Politics. He joins other heavy-hitting political bloggers and columnists, including David Corn, John Cranford, Craig Crawford, Jeff Stein and Richard Whalen. … Pfeiffer’s CQ Politics blog, called “Ground Game“, explores emerging stories and ideological debates taking place in the blogosphere and the larger world of online politics.”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer calls Ben Wallace-Wells’ 15,000-word article in the new (Dec. 13) issue of Rolling Stone the “Smartest Drug Story of the Year”

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    MAGAZINES

  • TNR’s The Plank reports, “National Review Declares Love For War, Commas”

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    RADIO

  • Tune in Saturday to NPR’s On the Media. U.S. News’ Ken Walsh will be on air chatting it up with host Bob Garfield at 4 p.m., WAMU 88.5

  • MarketWatch reports, “Sirius Satellite Radio remains hopeful that it can close its acquisition of XM Satellite Radio by the end of the year, as the Department of Justice has ‘little left to do’ to complete its review of the proposed transaction, Sirius Chief Financial Officer David Frear told investors on Tuesday.”

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • The Pew Weekly News Index shows, “Even as the 2008 presidential campaign draws increasing news coverage, the public shows limited awareness of the personal backgrounds of some of the top GOP candidates.”

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A release announced, “Eagle Publishing, Inc., announced today that Ron T. Lippock has joined the company as Vice President and Group Publisher. Lippock is responsible for Eagle’s rapidly growing direct-to-consumer geopolitical publications and for the Conservative Book Club.”

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    JOBS

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Financial Impact Editor

  • MacNeil/Lehrer Productions is looking for a Communications Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 10.02.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • It is almost unanimous. You think Les Kinsolving is “A total pain who’s become a joke”

  • Yuille Moves to CBS News

  • An NBC release announced, “NBC’s ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ reached a ratings milestone as the nation’s No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning its 10th consecutive season among total viewers and its 14th straight season among the key demographic adults 25-54.”

  • ABC’s “World News” webcast launched a new page on ABCNEWS.com yesterday.

  • Washington Post reports, “New mom Tracey Neale thought she understood how adopting twins would change her life. She had no clue.”

  • Ken Walsh helps pass the torch from Tony Snow to Dana Perino.

  • A reader weighs in on The New York Times magazine on D.C., calling it “horribly juvenile, amateurish, unprofessional, offensive, way off-base, and so full dumb generalizations, stereotypes and over-simplifications that it was worse than some high school newspaper articles that I’ve read. For about the millionth time: D.C. is NOT New York and New York is not New Orleans and New Orleans is not Austin and…etc., etc. No one can compare cities, and no one can say what is ‘energy’ or what is not, and no one can just bolt into a town and make generalizations that are not true. And, what, for some period of time there were no clubs in D.C. with ‘energy,’ and, poof, all of a sudden there are? Huh? What? What a stupid, dumb article to appear in The New York Times.”

  • A reader weighs on in Kucinich, “Dana Milbank gets the same treatment from the Kucinich camp. this is at the end of his column last week about the event at the press club on aliens: ‘So far, however, the presidential candidates remain, well, alienated.’ Even Kucinich. ‘If you have a serious question, just ask me,; Kucinich spokeswoman Natalie Laber replied when told of the UFO crowd’s hopes for her boss. ‘If not, then just keep your silly comments to yourself.’ (Milbank skewered Kucinich earlier this year over a press event he had to impeach Cheney, I believe).

  • The International Reporting Project (IRP) announced “12 senior editors and producers from across the United States to participate in an intensive 11-day visit to Korea this November as part of the IRP’s annual ‘Gatekeeper Editors’ fellowships. For the full list, click here. IRP also announced the three U.S. journalists awarded International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellowships for the fall 2007 program.

  • FishbowlNY has launched the 360 Daily Angle: “a video update of the morning’s news stories.” It’s produced and anchored by NYCTV’s Amy Palmer.

  • MarketWatch reports, “News Corp. Chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch joined heads of state from Turkey, Croatia and Timor-L’Este in condemning violence in Myanmar and called on economic prosperity as a cure for the global turmoil.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Since the public blow-up in July between Sumner Redstone and his daughter Shari over corporate governance and succession issues at their family-controlled entertainment empire, the 84-year-old chairman of Viacom Inc. and CBS Corp. has been on a campaign to convince the world that the feud has blown over.”

  • Dallas Morning News reports, “Belo Corp., owner of The Dallas Morning News and WFAA-TV, announced this morning that it intends to spin off its newspapers and publishing operations into a separate, publicly traded company.”

  • The Guardian reports, “The FT has announced a radical overhaul of the fees users must pay to access its website”

  • WWD.com reports, “Across the category, men’s titles are adapting to a field swept clean of most laddie magazines and men’s shopping titles, where luxury is king, and where reaching the older man is now a desirable proposition. GQ, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary, and Esquire, which will celebrate its 75th next year, used to be cast as stodgy by the British lad invasion, and both resorted to copying their formula of gross-out humor and barely clothed starlets.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc.’s AOL is poised to capture a bigger share of Internet marketing budgets as its advertising.com unit more than doubles sales to $1.3 billion in four years, a Bear Stearns Cos. analyst said.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “If the speculation is true about you and GQ magazine, you are playing a dangerous game with the media. This time, you apparently crossed the line.”

  • AP reports, “Barnes & Noble.com is getting a new look. Starting Monday, the online site for the superstore chain will have a thoroughly revised home page, including a running scroll of featured releases, and a number of new offerings, including Barnes & Noble Review, a magazine that will be updated daily with reviews and interviews.”

  • The Charlotte Observer reports, “In an address that made the musings of Nostradamus seem rosy by comparison, a respected industry observer warned radio executives Wednesday that their industry would all but evaporate within 20 years.”

  • Washington Post reports, “The industry has tried to get the word out, but many consumers still aren’t getting the message: In a year and a half, millions of television screens could go dark. Not the fancy high-definition TVs or those connected to cable or satellite. But the 70 million sets relying on rooftop or ‘rabbit ears’ antennas will end up showing nothing but snow.”

  • PBS Ombudsman writes, “This was a big week for PBS. On Monday night, the Public Broadcasting Service won 10 ‘Emmy’ Awards in the News and Documentary category, more than any broadcast or cable television network. And the night before, the highly-touted and much-publicized series ‘The War’ by famed documentary filmmaker Ken Burns made its debut on hundreds of PBS-affiliated stations across the country. But did PBS try to make what, by any measure, was a big — and justifiably good — week appear even bigger? The officials here say no, but it looks to me as though they did.”

  • “WHYY’s Bill Marrazzo is America’s best-paid public broadcasting exec. So why does his station give Philadelphians news from Delaware, produce almost no national or local programming, and have employees who are calling for his head?” asks Philadelphia Magazine.

  • Washington Post’s Howard Kurtz asks, “Out-of-Town Critics Too Tough On Thompson?”

  • A reader wonders whether shuster got the idea to ask blackburn…from moveon.org.

  • Media Week reports, “For the fourth consecutive season, Fox’s American Idol is network TV’s highest priced regular series for advertisers. The cost of a 30-second unit for upcoming episodes (which begin in January 2008) is $700,000 for both the Monday and Tuesday installments of the program, according to media buying and network sources.”

  • New York Times’ Brian Stelter reports, “When does a television show become an event worth covering on the evening news? Lately, the answer seems to be every week — at least when the show has high ratings expectations and runs on the same network as the newscast.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Juan Williams, whose conversation with Bill O’Reilly on The Radio Factor has been the subject of a week’s worth of cable and print stories, has written about being brought into the fray, and being labeled a ‘happy negro.’ He writes in Time magazine that he was ‘astounded’ to hear O’Reilly was being attacked ‘on the basis of that radio conversation as a ‘racist’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The British Broadcasting Corp. bought travel guidebook company Lonely Planet, gaining a catalogue of 500 travel guides from Antarctica to Zimbabwe to boost holiday coverage on television and the Web and expand outside the U.K.”

  • TVNewser reports, “TVNewser tipsters tell us more executive changes could be in the works at ABC News. ABC NewsOne VP Kate O’Brian is being tasked with a project to review the assignment desk. The desk is currently overseen by VP of news coverage, Mimi Gurbst. What this means for Gurbst is not yet clear. An ABC insider says O’Brian’s review should be finished in a few weeks. The insider says the review had been planned before last week’s hiring of Dave Davis as ABC News’ new #2.”

  • Kansas City Star reports, “The U.S. military needs to get over its fear of the media and open up, a panel of officers told newspaper pundits Friday.”

  • New York Times reports, “As the newspaper industry bemoans falling circulation, major papers around the country have a surprising attitude toward a lot of potential readers: Don’t bother. The big American newspapers sell about 10 percent fewer copies than they did in 2000, and while the migration of readers to the Web is usually blamed for that decline, much of it has been intentional.”

  • AP reports, “They speak English at the BBC, but CBS News veteran Rome Hartman still faced a language barrier when he was hired to create a newscast specifically for American viewers.”

  • The New York Times reports, “During the next year or so, The St. Petersburg Times plans to continue pursuing deeply reported, long-term features about such topics as Florida’s property insurance crisis, complex tax issues, public education at all levels, and wildlife and endangered species. It will balance this slate of stories against all the other bread-and-butter issues it covers everyday for its readers: politics, business, sports, community affairs, culture and more.”

  • NY Post reports, “The appointment of Dave Davis as ABC News’ new No. 2 has roiled staffers who believe the shuffling of the news division’s executive suite was mandated by corporate parent Disney — or more specifically Disney-ABC Television Group President Anne Sweeney, sources said.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “New York Times Co. began a campaign to bolster awareness of NYTimes.com, less than two weeks after it stopped charging readers to access parts of the Web site of its flagship newspaper.”

  • PRNewsire reports, “A new survey finds that 101 million adult Americans now get most of their news from Web sites, while 35 million people rely on TV comedians and eight million individuals turn to blogs for their main source of news.”

  • Justin Fishel, Andy Rooney’s grandson, is FOX News’ new Pentagon producer.

  • Media Week reports, “Hearst Magazines is building a case that, properly done, sweepstakes can be a legitimate way to grow circulation as well as online traffic. In August, Hearst’s Good Housekeeping launched the Pay Off Your Mortgage sweepstakes, which led to such an increase in traffic and sub growth (a challenge for any mature title) that the company is applying the model across its other titles.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Two weeks before the TV network launches, the web component of Fox Business Network is up and running.”

    Jobs

  • Fraud Squad TV is looking for a TV Reporter.

  • International Resources Group is looking for a Writer/Editor and Research Analyst.

  • The Daily Progress is looking for a Photojournalist.

  • Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is looking for a Feature Writer/Editor.

  • Avalon Publishing Group is looking for a Guidebook Writer and a Seeking Hiking Guidebook Writer.

  • FierceMarkets, Inc. is looking for a Senior Editor, Telecom & Digital Media

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Who Will Win In The WHCA?

    The 2007 elections for WHCA president (for 2009-2010) and for three seats on the Executive Board of the White House Correspondents’ Association (one at-large seat, one seat representing magazines and one seat representing TV) are underway (ballots were due Friday).

    Who will win?

    Bloomberg’s Ed Chen is running for both the at-large seat and the presidency and writes in his candidate statement, “If elected, in me you’ll get five-for-the-price-of-one. That’s because Bloomberg News is a player in every medium: television, radio, magazine, the Internet as well as print.” Because of this, Chen calls his candidacy “The One-Man Rainbow Coalition.” Chen later writes: “[I]f elected, I intend to engage the entire membership in an open conversation about our signature event. Surely there are ways to make the annual dinner (no, the entire evening) even more enjoyable…and less polarizing?”

    ABC’s Jon Garcia doesn’t say in his candidate statement what he’s running for but does say that he has “a passion for being a very loud, squeaky wheel when pushing for the WH to be more fiscally prudent on our behalf. It’s a passion so complete that, on behalf of my network and with the support of my TV colleagues, I have already drafted proposed revisions to our policies manual.”

    Fox News cameraman Brian Haefeli is running for the Television seat and has an interesting way of capitalizing certain words. Like: “These issues affect ALL OF US EVERYDAY.” And: “I feel that my years of experience and being at the White House EVERYDAY uniquely qualifies me to fill the Television seat of the WHCA. I would like this opportunity to represent ALL OF YOU…I will work for ALL of the membership EVERYDAY.”

    CNN’s Ed Henry is a candidate for the TV seat and says “I am a familiar face on the beat every day of the week, so you can count on me to hear and understand your concerns.” His three big issues are “1) I am pushing for an open meeting of all members of the association this summer to begin a dialogue on how to improve our annual dinner.” “2) Access, access, access.” “3) Finally, I will work hard to make sure all of the inevitable kinks are worked out in the new briefing room.”

    The WSJ’s John McKinnon is running for the at-large board seat and for president and he wants “to be clear why: people I respect a lot in the press corps asked me to.” He is not “doing this to help promote my organization, the Wall Street Journal, or to festoon my resume.” But he is “doing it to help ALL of us in the White House press corps — TV, radio, print, and online — do our jobs better, so collectively we can get closer to the truth of what goes on over there.” He also says that “The new video wall in the briefing room also could be a source of headaches for TV folks, if the White House tries to use it to jam content down our throats.” He says that his “decent relations” with the Bush administration make him a good candidate for the job. He’ll also “try not to screw up.”

    U.S. News & World Reports’ Ken Walsh is running for the magazine seat and believes that “the board should be more than a dinner committee.”

    Perhaps the most interesting candidate statement comes from Newsweek’s Richard Wolffe, who is running for both the magazine seat and for president. His candidate statement is really Wolffe’s treastise on the state of the news media. He begins his candidate statement with, “Let’s face it: we’re under attack.” He continues: “[W]e, as the White House press corps, are on the receiving end of a concerted campaign by political partisans on both sides. We could just pretend like this storm is going to pass; but it’s not…Now is the time to stand up for who we are and what we do.” First thing on the agenda? “Well how about defending the annual dinner for a start…Some people say that we’re compromised by going to dinner with our sources. Really? Does anyone seriously think we should confine ourselves to the briefing room? Under those rules, military reporters should avoid lunch with the troops.” Later, Wolffe says, “Other people say we’re biased — either to the left, or to the rigth. I’ve worked overseas, where a partisan press is the norm. I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again. By any measure, I believe we do a better job by being dogged and combative, but also non-partisan, balanced and accurate.” Wolffe ends: “This is a new era and we need new faces on the board.”

    Who’s got your vote?

    Celebrating 25 Years, Ken & Barclay Get A Nice Phone Call

    We got a sneak peak at Monday’s U.S. News & World Report:

      “Hey Ken Walsh,” our surprised White House correspondent heard June 13 when he and his wife Barclay were celebrating their 25th wedding anniversary in a hilltop restaurant overlooking the Athens Acropolis. “It was Al Gore,” says Walsh.

      Seems the former veep was in town to show off his global warming slide show to the Greek president and prime minister and stopped in Orizontes for a little lunch, saw a friendly face and ambled
      up for a little socializing. “It really is a small world,” says
      Gore’s spokeswoman Kalee Kreider.