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Posts Tagged ‘Marc Fisher’

WaPo Expands Local Homepage, Launches PostLocal.com

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Perhaps in preparation for the grand unveiling of Allbritton’s new local site TBD, WaPo today announced an expanded local homepage at PostLocal.com. The refreshed local site comes five weeks after the launch of PostPolitics.com.

Some of the new features on the site include the following:

New Local Politics Blog: The “DeBonis” blog debuts where local political expert Mike DeBonis will regularly break news, analyze the political scene and hold local leaders accountable. DeBonis will also write a column that will be published early online Thursdays and in print Fridays.

The Daily Gripe: Local residents can report problems in their neighborhoods and get a direct line to local officials who can fix those problems.

Lori’s A.M. Buzz: This weekday blog by Local Reporter Lori Aratani will provide readers with a digest of the newsiest stories of the morning and a look ahead to the day’s local coverage.

New Transportation Page: New features include a construction projects calendar, transportation tips for getting around the area and a Metro fare calculator. The Get There blog will also relaunch as Dr. Gridlock’s blog.

News Reload: Using The Post’s popular TimeSpace program, News Reload makes it simple to find local news, day by day. If you’ve been out of town or skipped a few days of news, News Reload allows you to easily find the top local stories for each day you missed.

Campaign Wikis: This feature provides the latest news on local elections and ways to participate in the races, starting with coverage of the D.C. mayoral race and the Md. governor’s race. Like any other Wiki, readers can also participate in the way The Post covers campaigns by contributing to and commenting on the entries for these campaigns.

D.C. Wire Blog: The District blog presents more conversational news from where residents live, including a Thursday online chat hosted by Marc Fisher and other Post staffers and Friday videos with Hamil Harris holding the mic.

DataPost: A collection of the most interesting, searchable databases developed by The Post and other local and national organizations and agencies. Explore traffic data, census figures and poverty rates, crime statistics, detailed results from past elections, and more.

All Opinions Are Local: A network of independent bloggers around the region who weigh in on important local issues.

Check it out here.

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David Pike Excellence in Journalism Award Submissions Due Today

David Pike Excellence in Journalism Award submissions are due today. It may be last minute but the process is pretty minimal so don’t miss your chance:

Street Sense, DC’s newspaper which provides economic opportunities to homeless individuals and educates the public about issues of homelessness, is holding its Third Annual Excellence in Journalism Awards. The awards, named in memory of Street Sense Board Member, David Pike, honors journalism that changes perceptions about homelessness, draws attention to factors affecting homelessness, and influences social responses to homelessness. David was a journalist of 40 years with notable publications like U.S. News & World Report.

Past awardees and guests have included Petula Dvorak, Marc Fisher and Mike Wiliamson of the Washington Post and Pulitzer prize-winning Author, David Shipler.

Criteria, guidelines and categories after the jump…

Read more

Allbritton Nabs Wemple for New Metro Site

Robert Allbritton has hired Erik Wemple, editor of City Paper, to edit the new metro site, which has yet to be named.

FishbowlDC has heard that WaPo’s Marc Fisher and other top editors around the country were under consideration for the job. But, said an industry insider, Wemple “won over the top brass with his take-charge attitude and innovative approach to the news.”

Taking Out The Trash

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart M – Th 11p / 10c
Moment of Zen – First Dog Puns
thedailyshow.com
Daily Show
Full Episodes
Economic Crisis Political Humor

What we almost missed today…

• The press has been panting after President Obama’s new puppy and hence a “Moment of Zen” for Daily Show‘s Jon Stewart. WaPo’s Howard Kurtz makes an appearance.

• WaPo has launched “Personality Pages” to “create an ecosystem around a writer/columnist with contextual information, links to content created by that person, and other features like RSS feeds,” according to a memo from managing editor Raju Narisetti. Politico reports “so far, 20 staffers were contacted about the program, with half responding: Joel Achenbach, Chris Cillizza, Marc Fisher, Dan Froomkin, Carolyn Hax, John Kelly, Howie Kurtz, Dana Milbank, Lisa de Moraes, and Rob Pegoraro.” Milbank’s up first and you can check out his prototype here.

• And finally today, TMZ has arrived in DC. First scoop, the pooch.

Who Made Wash City Paper’s 2009 “Best Of DC” List?

What do Wonkette’s Jim Newell, WaPo’s Marc Fisher, Politico’s John Harris, WAMU’s Kojo Nnamdi and The Big Hunt all have in common?

They all made the Washington City Paper’s 2009 “Best of DC” List. Below are some highlights we thought you’d find interesting. The complete list can be found here.

Best Local Blog/Blogger: Jim Newell, Wonkette

Best In-Depth Columnist: Marc Fisher, WaPo

Best Editor: John Harris, Politico

Best Ethnic Reporter: Kojo Nnamdi

Best Flack: Leah Gurowitz, DC Superior Court spokesperson

Best Local Politics: WAMU-FM’s DC Politics Hour

Best Local Twitterer: Ana Maria Cox

Best Media Happy Hour: Reason’s old Big Hunt bashes

Best Media Struggle: Newspapers vs. New Media

Best Name in Publishing: Johnny Yataco, the Washington Hispanic

Cranky Council Member Attacks Free Neighborhood Newspaper

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The Brookland Heartbeat, a bimonthly non-profit neighborhood newser is under attack by Ward 5 City Council Member Harry Thomas.

Last week, Thomas posted a letter to the editor on his website accusing the paper of “salacious headlines, biased reporting and a conflict of interest.” He also threatened to go after the Heartbeat’s advertisers saying “Long & Foster as well as businesses that support the pub. will be held accountable for their role in underwriting the Brookland Heartbeat.”

WaPo’s Marc Fisher reports:

The article that got Thomas’s goat is a nicely reported, fully sourced, and utterly unsensational story that examines what Ward 5 gets out of Thomas’s position as chairman of the Council’s committee overseeing libraries, parks and recreation. The story’s conclusion: The ward gets very little.

*Did I mention the Heartbeat’s article ran last July???

Check out Fisher’s article for the full story.

Morning Reading List 03.09.09

Good Morning FishbowlDC!

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

Its day 49 covering the Obama administration and week six for us. What we know and what we’re reading this Monday morning…

NEWSPAPERS | TV | RADIO | ONLINE | MAGAZINES | NEWS NOTES | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

NEWPAPERS

Jim Bellows died Friday. He was 86 and had Alzheimer’s disease. From AP: ” Jim Bellows, a famed editor who transformed struggling newspapers in Los Angeles, Washington and New York, nurtured the careers of Tom Wolfe and Jimmy Breslin and helped make “Entertainment Tonight” a TV hit, has died… For two decades beginning in the 1960s, Bellows took big-city newspapers that were fighting losing battles against large-budgeted giants and spiced them up with scrappy reporting and columns that often took jabs at their rivals.”

A longtime Rocky Mountain News reporter James Meadow died Sunday after a serious mountain biking accident. Friends and family have started a Facebook group here. Tributes to Meadow can also be found at “I wany my Rocky,” a blog dedicated to the paper.

In other news, a NYT story this weekend reports that the LA Daily News is going to try an experiment this summer wherein readers get to choose their own news. From FishbowlNY: The plan is to let readers customize their own papers with news stories they like and then print them in their own homes (so sort of like a dead tree RSS feed?).

McClatchy will cut 1,600 more jobs, or 15 percent of its workforce, as part of its restructing.

To thoughts on how to save newspapers: from NYT “United, Newspapers May Stand” and from the Christian Science Monitor “Professors could rescue newspapers.”

TV

WaPo’s Marc Fisher says DC is “suddenly hot” in primetime. “But with the election of Barack Obama, the shift of economic power from New York to the District, and the evolution of a voracious celebrity culture to include politicians and even campaign strategists, TV is rediscovering Washington. No longer is the city simply a collection of marble icons to be glommed onto police procedurals and other basic formats of television drama.”

Tell him something good. Mmmhmm. AP’s David Bauder reports NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams has received thousands of responses after asking viewers for some good news on his broadcast.

NYT also reports NBC is considering extending Nightly News to an hour long broadcast.

RADIO

How many people actually listen to Rush Limbaugh? “According to what Limbaugh delights in calling “the drive-by media,” the number varies wildly. Is it 30 million (Pat Buchanan on MSNBC), 20 million (Time magazine, ABC News), 19 million (Fox News), 14 million (CNN), or “14.2 million to about 25 million” (The Washington Post)?” Answer from WaPo’s Paul Farhi, maybe. Read more here.

In other Limbaugh news, HuffPost points out on his show Friday, he suggested Sen. Ted Kennedy would not see the health care reform legislaton pass. “Before it’s all over, it’ll be called the Ted Kennedy memorial health care bill,” they report Limbaugh said.

ONLINE

President Obama revealed to the NYT in last week’s interview that he doesn’t read FishbowlDC, or more specifically, blogs. From the transcript: Q: “No blogs?” “I rarely read blogs.” More on President Obama’s NYT interview on FBDC later today.

Just when everyone’s moved on to hating Twitter, The Weekly Standard’s Matt Labash wants to remind us, he still hates Facebook, calling the networking site, “dull– mind-numbingly dull.”

MAGAZINES

Check out 2008′s best and worst selling magazine issues (spoiler, President Obama is on the cover of a lot of the best selling ones.)

NEWS NOTES

From Howard Kurtz‘ Media Notes, “Obama Say Hola to a More Inclusive Press Strategy,” reaching out to Hispanic media.

Thank goodness for free newspapers at the White House. Washington Whispers tells us before becoming President Obama’s chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel used to swipe newspapers from roommates Democratic pollster Stanley Greenberg and his wife Rep. Rosa DeLauro. Emanuel lives in their basement apartment while in DC.

Slate’s Glenn Greenwald tackles the issue of anonymous political sources here.

REVOLVING DOOR

From DCRTV: Weekend news anchor Jennifer Ryan will be leaving Channel 9/WUSA as of this weekend. A source tells us that, by losing Ryan, “the station is breaking up the longest running anchor team with her and Bruce Johnson.” As a budget cutting move, WUSA recently replaced its weekend morning newscasts with infomercials.

From Playbook: Former press secretary to Vice president Cheney Megan Mitchell is now Communications Director for Rep. John Culberson (R-TX). Also moving on, Matt Mackowiak finishes two years as press secretary for Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX).

JOBS

CongressDaily is looking for a House leadership reporter.

HAT TIPS: Mediabistro

More Post Buyout Updates

Marc Fisher tells FishbowlDC that he’s considering the WaPo’s buyout:

    It’s just sad that the state of the industry has put so many of us in the position of having to choose whether to leave work that we dearly love.

Lois Romano will probably not take the buyout, we hear.

A round-up:

Gene Weingarten: Maybe.

Tamara Jones: Gone.

Susan Schmidt
: Gone.

Tim Page: Gone.

Maralee Schwartz: Gone.

Tom Ricks
tells us “I’ll probably take it, but haven’t yet made a final decision.”

Maybes: Dan Balz and Keith Richburg.

Desson Thomson: Maybe.

Richburg tells FishbowlDC: “I’m going to bali in early may, so I’m going to sit there looking at a white sand beach and the pacific ocean and then make up my mind.”

What about you, Posties: You or your neighbors considering the buyout? Let us know:

Morning Reading List, 01.15.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Wikipedia. (See King’s Wikipedia entry here.)

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think Hillary Clinton was “edgy” on “Meet”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Washington Business Journal reports, “Gannett Co. Inc. has named the chief executive of online ad company PointRoll Inc. to be its new chief digital officer, as it seeks to expand its online operations. Chris Saridakis, who was named PointRoll chief executive after McLean-based Gannett acquired the company two years ago, will oversee digital operations at Gannett’s newspapers and television stations. He will report directly to Gannett chief executive Craig Dubow.”

  • J. Peter Freire is the new Managing Editor of The American Spectator. Freire first came to the Spectator as an intern and editorial assistant under a journalism fellowship from the Intercollegiate Studies Institute.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The real Dowd scandal

  • Washington Post’s Deb Howell writes, “Here’s what happened in New Hampshire: Reporters lost their natural skepticism and took what they thought was happening and projected it far past the facts. The experts were wrong, the polling a disaster. The Post, luckily, didn’t poll late in New Hampshire and wasn’t among those making a bad call.”

  • The Virginian-Pilot’s Joyce Hoffman writes, “Coming on board as public editor with the news that Landmark Communications, and with it The Virginian-Pilot, is likely to be sold is a daunting endeavor. An end to the century-old tradition of leadership by a family with a historic commitment to public service journalism is a troubling prospect for Hampton Roads.”

  • Richard Just writes, “What happened at the Supreme Court 20 years ago tomorrow has been long forgotten by most Americans — if they ever heard about it at all. Unlike the better-known decisions of the last century, the ruling handed down on Jan. 13, 1988, had nothing to do with race or abortion rights. It didn’t become fodder for presidential candidates and hasn’t galvanized voters on either the left or right. Yet over the past two decades, the court’s ruling in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, which concerned high school newspapers, has had far-reaching consequences. Not only has it changed the way journalism is taught at many schools, it has made it more difficult for high school students to learn the important lessons about democracy that come from publishing — or simply reading — serious newspapers.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “MSNBC presents special live coverage
    … of the Michigan primary, as well as the Democratic presidential debate live from Nevada. Coverage begins with ‘Hardball with
    Chris Matthews’ live from Las Vegas at 5 and 7 p.m. ET, ‘Tucker’ live at 6 p.m. ET and ‘Countdown with Keith Olbermann’ at 8 p.m. ET.”

  • A CNN release announced the network “will dedicate the 8 p.m. hour each weekday to the latest election news coverage from the campaign trail in a new program, CNN Election Center. Building on CNN’s successes and ratings wins from both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primaries, CNN Election Center will be anchored by members of the ‘Best Political Team on Television’ from the New York-based CNN Election Center and on the trail by CNN anchor John Roberts.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Broadcasting & Cable published an editorial today that served as a call to the networks to focus more energy on presidential news coverage. It also applauded ABC News for its debate coverage, which rated extremely well, and its New Hampshire special, which didn’t, but was the only network that gave the primary a half-hour.”

  • The Washington Times reports, “A legal battle over advertisements for a new documentary about Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton illustrates the folly of current campaign-finance laws, says the attorney for the producers of the film, which premieres tonight in Washington. ‘Hillary: The Movie’ is ‘a political documentary like Michael Moore or Al Gore has made,’ said James Bopp, who went to federal court last week to represent the movie’s producers. Yet the conservative group Citizens United, which produced the Clinton film, must ‘go to court to get permission to advertise the film… because of McCain-Feingold,’ he said.”

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “If you saw John Kerry on ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ Sunday morning, you saw him talking about his endorsement of Barack Obama. And you probably also saw him successfully pull off a tough stunt — banning something he didn’t want from the show.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Rep. Ron Paul took part in last Thursday’s GOP debate on Fox News after being excluded in the New Hampshire forum. His supporters were, well, less than happy with Fox News over the decision to leave out Paul from the N.H. forum, as Frank Luntz explained.”

  • TVNewser reports that MSNBC announced in a press release how it plans to handle hosting a debate and covering the Michigan primary tonight. The debate will take place at 9 p.m.
  • PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler writes, “The press, the pundits and the polls all got a big black eye this week after forecasting, with considerable certainty, a big victory for Sen. Barack Obama in the Democratic primary in New Hampshire. Much has already been written and broadcast about this episode. Newspapers and television networks have had stories about how everybody got it wrong and what the various reasons may have been. I don’t have much to add to this other than to wonder if individual news organizations — aside from their obvious, next-day follow-up stories — took some time to conduct their own in-house post-mortems to figure out if this glaring error in polling and news judgment should alter in some fundamental way the manner in which they approach political coverage. It’s not as though it hasn’t happened before.”

  • This Wednesday at Nathan’s Q&A cafe will feature Amy Holmes, described as “a three-fer: female, black and republican. There’s not much we won’t be able to politically slice and dice.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Hotline’s On Call is covering the Michigan primary live tonight.

  • Poynter’s Steve Klein reports, “No one has been more supportive of bloggers and more critical of mainstream media than Ted Leonsis, the former AOL executive who owns the NHL Washington Capitals. (OK, well maybe Mark Cuban is close.) Leonsis has paid to send independent bloggers to cover Caps prospects in Russia, and when long-time Washington Times hockey writer Dave Fay died late last year, no one was kinder. So when Leonsis shelled out $124 million over 13 years last week to keep his franchise player, Alex Ovechkin, in town — it was the biggest contract in Washington D.C. sports history — Leonsis had a right to expect some accurate coverage in the MSM and some honest passion from the bloggers. But to read the owner’s very active blog, Ted’s Take, it doesn’t appear he got a great deal of either.”

  • Christopher Hitchens Watch reports that Hitchens has quit smoking. No, really.

  • Be sure to c heck out Breitbart TV. Ed Driscoll reports, “About a minute into the latest B-Cast by Liz Stephans and Scott Baker of Breitbart.TV (whom we interviewed a few weeks ago on PJM Political), they casually mention that their previous show attracted about 400,000 views.”

  • Marc Fisher reports, “Living in a city without a full-time jazz station, I have to rely on CDs and downloads to hear my fill of Miles Davis and John Coltrane. But to discover new jazz from singer Madeleine Peyroux or pianist Bruce Barth, it’s necessary to reach past broadcast radio to online music services, music blogs and pay satellite radio. But now comes NPR Music, a sprawling Web site from National Public Radio on which I can listen to the NPR jazz (or classical or folk or indie rock) shows that don’t air on Washington’s public stations — as well as tap into song lists, video and audio of concerts, music-related stories from NPR’s news shows and a raft of programs from public stations across the country.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Wonkette reports, “Campaigns & Elections magazine was one of those old insider trade magazines for people that simply couldn’t get enough of campaign tactics and other campaigners in the off-season — but there’s nary an off-season anymore. So, C&E redesigned the magazine (it’s shiny!), started writing about politics and threw a swanky party with an open bar in a big black room to celebrate.” For pics, click here.

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    RADIO

  • Former CBS Public Eye editor Matthew Felling is hosting “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today at noon on WAMU 88.5, talking Macs and Movies.

  • The Redskins’ Tumultuous Season Didn’t Gain Yardage on Sports Radio

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    JOBS

  • CommunicationWorks is looking for a Media Manager.

  • mediabistro.com is looking for mediabistro.com Instructors.

  • Widmeyer Communications is looking for an Account Manager and a Senior Associate/Assistant Vice President.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Technology Writer.

  • WTOP Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • WFED Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • AARP is looking for a Managing Editor — AARP Bulletin.

  • SourceMedia is looking for a Reporter, The Bond Buyer/Washington Bureau.

  • Strauss Radio Strategies, Inc. is seeking PR Pros Specializing in Broadcast.

  • Youth Today is looking for a Publisher and a Managing Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Poor Marc Fisher…

    The Washington Post’s Marc Fisher posted this notice on the paper’s internal message board on Friday:

      do yourselves a favor and don’t use the first car in the main bank of elevators–the one closest to the newsroom. i just spent a lovely chunk of the afternoon stuck between 3 and 4, lurching up and down.

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