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Posts Tagged ‘Pat Buchanan’

Sunday Show Preview

  • Meet The Press: Rahm Emanuel, Incoming White House Chief of Staff, Tom Brokaw, NBC News, David Brooks, New York Times, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Presidential Historian, Tavis Smiley, Host, PBS’s Tavis Smiley, Chuck Todd, Political Director, NBC News.

  • Face the Nation: Incoming National Economic Council director Lawrence Summers, Georgetown University Michael Eric Dyson and Slate’s John Dickerson.

  • This Week: David Axelrod, President-elect Obama’s senior adviser and a roundtable with The Brookings Institution’s E.J. Dionne, PBS’ Gwen Ifill and ABC News’ Donna Brazile, Matthew Dowd, and George Will.

  • Face The Nation: Lawrence Summers, President-Elect Obama’s designee to be the director of
    the National Economic Council.

  • Fox News Sunday: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Incoming White House Press Secretary, Robert Gibbs and a panel with Brit Hume, Fox News Senior Political Analyst, Mara Liasson, National Public Radio & Fox News, Bill Kristol, Weekly Standard & Fox News and Juan Williams, National Public Radio & Fox News.

  • CNN’s State of The Union with John King: President-elect Barack Obama, David Axelrod, senior Obama adviser, Ed Gillespie, Bush White House counselor, Dana Perino, Bush White House press secretary, Dee Dee Myers, former Clinton White House press secretary, Dan Lothian, CNN White House correspondent, April Ryan, White House correspondent, American Urban Radio Networks

  • Bloomberg’s Political Capital with Al Hunt: Senate Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad.

  • GPS: Wall Street Journal’s Peggy Noonan, Pat Buchanan, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty’s John O’Sullivan and New Yorker’s Hendrik Hertzberg.

  • Chris Matthews Show: HD Net’s Dan Rather, New York Times’ Helene Cooper, NBC Washington bureau chief Mark Whitaker and BBC’s Katty Kay.

  • C-SPAN’s Newsmakers: Sen. Judd Gregg, (R-NH), Ranking Member on the Senate Banking Committee, will be interviewed by Shailagh Murray, Washington Post Congressional Reporter, and Martin Kady, The Politico Congressional Reporter.

  • Morning Reading List, 07.30.08

    Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

    We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

    Read more

    WaTimes to Buchanan: Bring It On!

    Washington Times editorial page editor Deb Simmons has challenged Pat Buchanan to “a conversation on race” following his column “A brief for whitey.”

    Morning Reading List, 03.03.08

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    Good morning Washington. One year ago we said goodbye to Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. and AP said hello (again) to Ron Fournier. It’s the birthday of Alexander Graham Bell, Jessica Biel and, yes, me, which is the closest I’ll ever get to the lovely Biel. And to answer your questions: 1.) No, I don’t feel older, 2.) I was sick of my 20s anyway and 3.) A flat screen tv would be great, thanks.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • You think Willie Geist is hotter than Joe Scarborough.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Times reports, “It’s a bad day for those assigned to cover the Redskins on a daily basis — the team has parted ways with Chris Helein, the media relations chief since the summer of 2006.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Killing Competition Breeds New-Style Foreign Correspondents

  • The latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press shows, Barack Obama is riding high as the March 4 primaries approach. Obama has moved out to a broad-based advantage over Hillary Clinton in the national Democratic primary contest and holds a 50%-43% lead over John McCain in a general election matchup.”

  • On the Press Bus, Some Questions Over Favoritism

  • Gannett Blog reports, “Batting three for three, The Arizona Republic appears to be protecting another top Gannett executive from embarrassing online reader comments. The paper published its story about newly appointed newspaper division President Robert Dickey (left) — without allowing comments at the story’s end. Dickey, 50, the Republic’ s chairman, replaces retiring Sue Clark-Johnson, 61 — another former Republic executive.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “At the San Jose Mercury News, reporters have been instructed to wait at home on the morning of March 7. If they don’t get a phone call by 10 a.m. telling them that they’ve lost their jobs, they should head to work.”

  • The Crimson reports,Linda J. Greenhouse ’68, the New York Times reporter and former Crimson editor who has covered the U.S. Supreme Court for 30 praise-filled years, will retire from her beat, the newspaper confirmed yesterday.”

  • From a reader: “Here’s another one on everyone’s fave new media honco, Zell: If you look at the AP’s board of directors’ history, they hardly ever eliminate a Trib/NYT/WaPo member from their board, so Zell’s a shoo-in. If you were Ken Lowe/Gary Pruitt, would YOU piss off this man and vote ‘no?’ Me neither. When he visited the DC buros, I hear he had Randy Michaels, the up & coming CEO, in tow the whole time…”

  • Peggy Noonan on William Buckley.

  • The AP reports, “The Boston Globe says it plans to cut 60 jobs by offering voluntary employee buyouts. Publisher P. Steven Ainsley is telling staff that the buyout packages are a difficult but necessary step to lower costs and keep the business healthy. The plan is part of a broader cost-cutting effort.”

  • William F. Buckley’s Greatest Hits

  • The AP reports, “The New York Times Co. said Friday its January revenue from continuing operations dropped 5.5 percent, weighed down by a significant classified ad sales decline. The company, whose properties include The Boston Globe, International Herald Tribune and its namesake daily, said revenue from continuing operations slipped to $272.3 million from $288 million in the prior-year period.”

  • Newsday.com reports, “Newsday publisher Tim Knight Thursday announced that the newspaper will be cutting about 120 jobs throughout the company, citing declining sales and the ‘soft advertising revenue environment.’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “McClatchy Co., the newspaper publisher that paid $4.1 billion for Knight Ridder Inc. in 2006, wrote down the value of its publications for the second time in four months.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Harbinger Capital Partners NY LLC and its affiliate Harbert Management Corp. on Friday filed a proxy with the Securities and Exchange Commission to elect four directors to New York Times Co.’s board at the 2008 annual meeting, scheduled for April 22″

  • Regarding The New York Times, Jay Rosen asks Romenesko readers, “What were the editors thinking?”

  • StuffWhitePeopleLike has The New York Times at #46. “Mornings are exceptionally important to white people, as witnessed by their love of breakfast places. However, some white people never go out for breakfast on a Sunday Morning. The reason? The Sunday edition of the New York Times.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “‘The Chris Matthews Show’ was the number-two rated Sunday morning public affairs show tying CBS’s ‘Face the Nation,’ and topping ABC’s ‘This Week’ and ‘FOX News Sunday’ in households nationally for the week ending February 24, 2008.”

  • The Washingtonian asks “Who’s Really The Best Political Team in Television?”

  • And NBC announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the top rated Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, February 24, 2008 in all categories.”

  • Griffin Compliments Countdown Demo Win

  • C-SPAN 2 & C-SPAN Radio will air the election results at 7:30 p.m., pending the Senate schedule.

  • A CNN release announced, “On the heels of CNN’s ratings win for the month of February and the network’s nine presidential primary debates, seven of which were among the most-watched in cable news history, CNN’s political team will report live from the CNN Election Center and across the country for the Tuesday, March 4 primaries. Voters in Texas, Ohio, Vermont and Rhode Island will cast their ballots and CNN journalists and analysts will be on-hand to report the results and what it means for the remaining presidential candidates.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox & Friends saw double digit gains year-to-year. The 7-9amET morning show is up 22% in Total Viewers, averaging 953,000 viewers this month. CNN’s American Morning is up 13% from last year, and is averaging 469,000 viewers.”

  • Poynter Online reports,Terry Gross, the Peabody Award-winning host of the NPR talk show Fresh Air, is a guest voice — as herself — on The Simpsons airing Sunday, March 2 on FOX. Actor Topher Grace also makes a guest voice appearance in the episode.”

  • TVNewser reported that Megyn Kelly got married this weekend. Sorry guys.

  • The Washington Post reports, “The recently resolved Hollywood writers’ strike took its toll on local ratings during the February sweeps period that ended Wednesday. Prime-time ratings declined last month compared with the same period in 2007 for nearly all Washington stations, which because of the strike aired more reruns and reality programming. The dip in prime-time viewership in turn affected ratings for some of the station’s late-night and early-morning newscasts.”

  • TVNewser reports,Liz Cox Barrett writes in the Columbia Journalism Review about an exchange on Morning Joe Wednesday morning with Pat Buchanan and Joe Scarborough. Buchanan and Scarborough were discussing Sen. Hillary Clinton and the difference between her speech pattern and that of Sen. Barack Obama.”

  • Power Line reports, “The Times Goes Looking for Media Bias … Not, as you might expect, in the mirror. Instead, the Times pointed its finger at a television station in the Republican South. This is a spin-off from the recent 60 Minutes story that apparently claimed it was Karl Rove’s fault that former Alabama Governor Don Siegelman was convicted of bribery and mail fraud. I haven’t followed that story closely, assuming that it is another 60 Minutes hoax.”

  • Jeff Greenfield: Sunday Nights Live

  • Media Money reports, “Time Warner’s new CEO Jeff Bewkes just showed Wall Street that he means business about cost cutting and getting the company on track. He just made his first big move: consolidating Time Warner’s New Line studio into its separate and larger Warner Bros.”

  • FreePress.net reports, “We just caught Comcast Corp. stacking an FCC hearing with paid (and apparently sleepy) seat-fillers. The hearing was set up to investigate Comcast’s recent blocking of the Internet. But Comcast packed the room so that the public couldn’t get in to voice their support for Net Neutrality.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS’ Bob Schieffer is this year’s recipient of the Leonard Zeidenberg First Amendment Award. It will be presented to him by PBS’ Jim Lehrer at the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation’s First Amendment Awards Dinner next week in Washington, D.C. CNN’s John Roberts will emcee the March 6 event. Other award presenters are to include ABC News President David Westin and NBC Universal CEO Jeff Zucker.”

  • TVNewser has a round-up of the ratings and reviews from MSNBC’s Tuesday’s Democratic debate.

  • Washingtonian presents, David Simon Chats About The Wire’s Final Weeks”

  • His Extreme-ness says, “If you base fictional politicians on real-life politicians, are you allowed to flip-flop on the issues — just like the real guys do? Apparently so if you’re David Simon, creator of the mega HBO hit ‘The Wire.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • It was Karl Frisch’s 30th birthday on Saturday.

  • A release announced, “New America Foundation’s Next Social Contract Initiative and Pollster Cliff Zukin released new findings on how public opinion shapes national values and informs the potential for policy reform, particularly in the areas of health care, education, taxes and economic security.” Check out the report entitled “The American Public and the Next Social Contract: Public Opinion and Political Culture in 2007″ here.

  • FaithfulAmerica.org, now operated by Faith in Public Life, sent a letter individually signed by 9,000 people of faith to the polling directors at the media organizations that sponsor the presidential primary exit polls. The letter asks ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox and the AP to stop stereotyping people of faith by asking all voters — Republicans and Democrats — the same religion questions on the exit poll surveys. We expressed particular concern that Republican voters in every state have been asked if they are evangelical, while Democrats have not been asked if they are evangelical in a single state. Signatures are still streaming in at FaithfulAmerica.org.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “In the convoluted saga of Microsoft Corp. bidding to gobble up Yahoo Inc., speculation about News Corp. emerging as the white knight to rescue the beleaguered Internet giant refuses to die.”

  • Post I.T. writes,Craig Newmark seems pretty content with his business, the hugely successful craigslist.org. He hasn’t accepted any outside funding, has declined offers to buy the site, and he doesn’t have any big plans to change its formats or features. So why was Newmark one of the keynote speakers this morning at the Southeast Venture Capital Conference in Tysons Corner? ‘I’m a curiosity,’ he said, sounding somewhat baffled by the attention he’s gotten since launching the site in 1995. The product hasn’t changed much. He still lists free classified ads from all over the world, charging only for job listings in 11 major markets and for apartment listings in New York City.”

  • NMA reports, “Hearst Digital Network, the online division of the National Magazine Company, is to close a host of its magazine websites. The move is part of a rationalisation of the network’s key brands that will see it reduce its focus from 13 titles down to five. The four magazine sites being closed include Good Housekeeping and Country Living, which will be wrapped into a single portal, Allaboutyou.com.”

  • Portfolio reports, “TechCrunch is the talk of Silicon Valley. Now the founder of the blog talks about the battle between Microsoft and Yahoo, Barry Diller, and why he says Gawker Media’s Nick Denton is ‘amoral.’”

  • ClickZ reports, “Yahoo has started testing behavioral and geo-targeting across its growing network of newspaper publisher sites. A preview of its nascent display ad management platform and recent statements from Yahoo execs indicate the firm’s sales restructuring, newspaper consortium project and network ambitions are aligning.”

  • Reuters reports, “Nearly 70 percent of Americans believe traditional journalism is out of touch, and nearly half are turning to the Internet to get their news, according to a new survey.”

  • A release announced, “DCist.com is pleased to announce its second annual DCist Exposed Photography Show, in partnership with Civilian Art Projects, running March 7-15, 2008. 44 local photographers, both amateur and professional, were chosen out of over 250 who submitted their work for the show through the DCist Flickr site. Every day DCist.com selects photos from a user-generated Flickr photo pool to use in its daily coverage of local news, arts and entertainment, politics, food and sports.”

  • Eric Boehlert writes, “The press will torment Obama, too”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar talks to George Carlin and finds out he “Reads More Blogs Than You Do”

  • Wonkette reports, “Important New York Times editorial decisions
    New Republic Investigates NY Times Newsroom Politics Over Single Article, Again”

  • “Two thirds of Americans — 67% — believe traditional journalism is out of touch with what Americans want from their news, a new We Media/Zogby Interactive poll shows.

  • Mark Glaser writes, “Distinction Between Bloggers, Journalists Blurring More Than Ever”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Ten years ago, he was a reclusive, pasty-faced 31-year-old who, bashing away on his laptop in his grungy Hollywood apartment, shot to prominence when he threatened to bring down Bill Clinton’s presidency by breaking news of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Now, Matt Drudge owns a luxurious Mediterranean-style stucco house on Rivo Alto Island in Florida’s Biscayne Bay, a condominium at the Four Seasons in Miami and is said to drive a black Mustang. He remains an elusive, mysterious figure but the internet pioneer is arguably the single most powerful journalist — though his detractors even deny that is his occupation — in the world.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Some say that the media have fallen hard for Barack Obama. Others note that journalists once carried a torch for John McCain and may well do so again. Watch the coverage closely, however, and it turns out that the most powerful media bias in this campaign is not for a person but for a decade.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • The Nation’s Richard Kim writes, “I won’t attempt a grand summary of the late William F. Buckley’s legacy. The man was undeniably one of the great political forces of the 20th century — so too were Ronald Reagan and Milton Friedman. But in seeking to capture the scope of his influence, writers on the left have taken to applauding Buckley’s ‘brilliance.’”

  • On Buckley, Slate’s Timothy Noah writes, “Why we should be (mostly) glad that he outlived his brand of conservatism.”

  • Slate’s Michael KinsleyOn Intellectual Honesty Bill Buckley had it, journalism should strive for it, and politics needs more of it.”

  • Yale Daily News reports, “William F. Buckley Jr. ’50, whose penchant for the pen beginning in his earliest years at Yale popularized the conservative movement and transformed a generation of American politics, died Wednesday at his home in Stamford, Conn. He was 82.”

  • DMNews.com reports, “In an effort to heighten brand awareness of its online and print magazine titles, Hearst Magazines Digital Media will participate in Yahoo Buzz. Yahoo Buzz allows readers to vote on the popularity of online stories. Yahoo then posts the winners on its homepage. Hearst has signed on ten of its titles, including Esquire, Cosmopolitan and Redbook, as Buzz content partners.”

  • The Progressive announced that they have added two new columnists: “Dave Zirin, who delves into the politics of sports, and Jim Hightower, the great—and funny—Texas populist.”

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    RADIO

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News journalists Larry Abramson and Marisa Penaloza have been honored by the Education Writers Association with its ‘National Award for Education Reporting’ in the radio category for a year-long NPR on-air and online series following a Baltimore-area high school’s efforts to improve student achievement.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “Conservative talker Laura Ingraham gave her a big break, and now former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright wants her own radio show. ‘I think it would be so much fun,’ she tells us. ‘I love talking, listening, and asking and responding to questions.’ Albright was recently on Ingraham’s show talking up Sen. Hillary Clinton when she felt the urge to have the mike to herself. ‘I like to be provocative and like to be provoked,’ she says. ‘Having been on many radio shows, I know they provide great opportunities to learn about many different subjects and allow you to have fun while doing it—all without having to put on makeup!’”

  • Radio Ink reports, “XM Satellite Radio CEO Nate Davis this morning detailed some cost-saving changes his company is making to its marketing strategy, and also revealed how he’s working with Apple to make XM programming more accessible to iPod users.”

  • Reuters reports, “XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc and Sirius Satellite Radio Inc have extended by two months a deadline to potentially terminate without penalty Sirius’s year-old proposed acquisition of its bigger rival.”

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    JOBS

  • Army Times Publishing Company is seeking Deputy News Editor for Navy Times and Navytimes.com.

  • Eurasia Group is seeking an Editor.

  • Liberty University is looking for a Promotional Copywriter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for an Assistant Documents Editor.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for an Editor.

  • MarketWatch is looking for a Financial Regulation & Housing Reporter.

  • The Humane Society of the United States is seeking an Associate Editor.

  • Carroll County Times is looking for a Features reporter.

  • Citigate Cunningham is looking for a Director of Technology Public Relations and an Account Manager for Technology Public Relations.

  • National Federation of Independent Business is looking for a Web Communications Manager.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • The Story With “The Story”

    (alternate headline: “Bill Keller’s day is gonna suck“)

    Yeah, so have you heard about this New York Times McCain story?

    Initial assessments and punditry do not support the New York Times’ decision to run the piece.

    McCain says it’s not true. Bob Bennett says the NYTimes has “lowered its standards” and calls the piece “a hit job.” Pat Buchanan called it a “weasley headline” on “Morning Joe.” Time’s Richard Stengel says he never would have run it. Tim Russert said that the more you read it, the softer the article seems. Rich Lowry says “The Times doesn’t have the goods—at least from what’s in the story–and shouldn’t have run it.” Mike Allen called it a “famously bland headline.” Joe Scarborough says the NYT has “a lot of questions to answer.” El Rushbo chimes in against the “drive-by media.” Ana Marie Cox (who likes paper dolls) gets a reaction from the McCain camp. Sam Stein asks, “Why Did The NYT Hold McCain-Lobbyist Story?” Marc Cooper says, “John McCain Owes The New York Times a Thank You Card.” Drudge had a field day with it. The McCain people clearly don’t like it:

      “It is a shame that the New York Times has lowered its standards to engage in a hit and run smear campaign,” said communications director Jill Hazelbaker, in a prepared statement sent about an hour after the Times posted their story online.

    TNR (which was rumored to have forced the NYT’s hand on the story) thinks that “a lot of stuff was edited out.” The mag is working on its own story:

      The McCain campaign is apparently blaming TNR for forcing the Times’ hand on this story. We can’t yet confirm that. But we can say this: TNR correspondent Gabe Sherman is working on a piece about the Times’ foot-dragging on the McCain story, and the back-and-forth within the paper about whether to publish it. Gabe’s story will be online tomorrow.

    Tucker’s having lunch with Frank Foer today so perhaps he can get the inside scoop.

    Leading the charge against the piece (based on both today’s “Today” show and “Morning Joe”) is NBC/MNSBC. And, wait: Aren’t they also partners with the NYT?

    Anne Applebaum says: “Thanks to lack of evidence, the article reads not like an expose but like an elaborate and extended piece of insinuation.

    Clark Hoyt! Where are you?!?

    And in case you were wondering…the reporters: Jim Rutenberg, Marilyn Thompson, David Kilpatrick and Stephen Labaton.

    TV coverage notes from TVNewser

    “John McLaughlin Is The Funniest Man On Television”?

    Esquire’s Chuck Klosterman looks at “The McLaughlin Group” in the latest issue and has some interesting things to say:

  • “I can’t think of any program that has taught me more about human interaction, if not necessarily about politics or journalism.”

  • Critics sometimes suggest that the success of The McLaughlin Group has led to the erosion of serious discourse in American media, but that’s like complaining about AC/DC because of Rhino Bucket. The failures of its followers only serve to illustrate why The McLaughlin Group is — almost exactly — what televised arguing should look, sound and feel like. The shows that plagiarized the ‘McGroup’ format copied the wrong things; the only quality they duplicated was the volume. What actually makes The McLaughlin Group so continually watchable is a) its inherent understanding of how personal dynamics operate, b) its supernatural ability to incarnate idealized semiotics, and c) the force of one specific personality. The show remains brilliant.”

  • Klosterman describes Pat Buchanan explaining how Eleanor Clift helped Buchanan grieve over his cat Gipper, when he passed away.

  • On John McLaughlin (whom Buchanan describes as “a benevolent dictator”): “The moment the taping concluded, he jumped into a town car, was driven to Reagan airport, and flew to Florida. Our only interaction was a handshake ninety seconds before airtime. He shook my hand and asked his assistant, ‘Who’s this guy?’ It was like shaking hands with a humanoid owl.”

  • “John McLaughlin is the funniest man on television. Has anyone ever generated so much entertainment value from the process of loudly asking questions?”

  • Will Other Washingtonians Say “No” To “Imus”?

    MediaMatters has the comprehensive list of Imus guests for 2007, including such Washingtonians as Howard Fineman, Tim Russert, Andrea Mitchell, David Brooks, Mary Matalin, Bob Schieffer, Chris Matthews, Judy Woodruff, Jim Lehrer, Evan Thomas, Pat Buchanan, Chris Wallace, Paul Begala, Howard Kurtz, David Shuster, Thomas Friedman, George Stephanopoulos, Kelly O’Donnell, Jim Miklaszewski, Stuart Taylor Jr., David Gregory and Anne Hull.

    Ana Marie Cox
    has said no mas to Imus. Will anyone else? And, more importantly, should they?

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