TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Ralph Hanson’

Morning Reading List, 11.07.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Content Marketing 101

Content Marketing 101Starting September 8, get hands-on content marketing training in Content Marketing 101! Through a series of webcasts, content and marketing experts will teach you the best practices for creating, distributing and measuring the results of your brand's content, including how to develop a content marketing plan, become a content marketing and more. Register now! 

Morning Reading List, 11.04.08

1102 002.JPG

Good morning Washington. Enjoy the day, win or lose. You deserve it.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 11.03.08

Capturenypostwatchelect.JPG
(Thanks NY Post)

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 10.31.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 10.01.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 09.12.08

4345057.jpg

Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 10.15.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Thank you notes on paper are a sweet gesture.

  • FBN: The Schedule

  • Drudge reports that Imus is back.

  • WUSA Hires New Anchor to Join McGinty

  • Clark Hoyt and Deb Howell do some ombudding.

  • Group Plans to Provide Investigative Journalism

  • Washington Monthly’s Paul Glastris is on tonight’s “Colbert Report.”

  • Everybody Sucks: Gawker and the rage of the creative underclass.”

  • NBC announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning on Sunday, October 7, 2007, in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.”

  • Brian Williams to host SNL.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday October 7, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers for the fourth straight week. This marks the fifth time in six weeks ‘This Week’ outperformed ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers.”

  • Christopher Hitchens vs. Alister McGrath.

  • NBC Dominates RTNDA Awards

  • Fox Puts Its Money on ‘Fun’ Business Channel

  • An NBC release announced, “Valerie Plame Wilson sits down with Meredith Vieira in her first-ever live television interview, on NBC News’ ‘Today,’ Monday, October 22.”

  • Marc Fisher isn’t a huge fan of XM Radio’s new POTUS channel.

  • Judy Miller reviews “Curveball.”

  • Gene Weingarten on how to save the newspaper industry.

  • Michael Murphy, Senior Manager, Media Relations at FNC is leaving the network.

  • The Pulitzer accuracy test.

  • Washington Post Buys CourseAdvisor Online Directory

  • A tipster tells us that Danielle Karson, a longtime WAMU (NPR) reporter and host, has left the station.

  • New York Times reports, “When Zachary McCune, a student at Brown, received an e-mail message from the university telling him he might have broken the law by downloading copyrighted songs, his eyes glazed over the warning and he quickly forgot about it. ‘I already knew what they’d say about file-sharing,’ he said. ‘It’s become a campus cliché.’”

  • From Freakonomics: “Here Are the Answers to Your Craigslist Questions”

  • TVNewser reports, “After 11 years in New Jersey, in a matter of days, MSNBC will make the move into a combined facility on the 3rd, 4th and 5th floors of the GE Building at 30 Rockefeller Center.”

  • Reuters reports, “Viewers have yet to see a single show, but the power of Rupert Murdoch’s name has convinced some that his Fox Business Network has a shot at succeeding, even if it won’t dislodge U.S. business cable news leader CNBC just yet.”

  • New York Times reports, “ABC Reshapes the Evening News for the Web”

  • PR Week reports, “Unions in the media industry face the same challenges as their industrial brethren; they are derided by opponents as vestiges of an obsolete economic model that promote mediocrity and shackle companies from making forward-looking changes.”

  • E&P reports, “ABC Explains New Move to Count Web Traffic — and How It Is Measured”

  • A release announced, “The second annual Slate 60 Conference will honor innovative philanthropy on October 21-22, 2007 at the Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Arkansas. The Slate 60 Conference will feature top philanthropists, including President Bill Clinton, Robert Kennedy, Jr., Eli Broad, actor Michael J. Fox, Carlos Slim Helu, who recently contributed $100 million to the Clinton Giustra Sustainable Growth Initiative, sharing their personal stories in giving and how philanthropic contributions are changing the world. Speakers will discuss innovation in various sectors of philanthropy such as education, health care, and the environment.”

  • Check out the latest edition of Mediabistro’s J-School Confidential. “In this edition of J-School confidential, our Columbia MA student attempts cope with the ever-growing pile of printouts beside her bed.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “When a challenger takes on the champion, boxing judges don’t award points for effort alone. The upstart almost always has to win by a knockout, pure and simple.”

  • A release announced, “The National Association of Hispanic Journalists urged House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the leadership of the House of Representatives to pass a bill to create a federal shield law that would protect journalists from attempts to try to force them to reveal their confidential sources. A vote on this bill has unexpectedly been scheduled for next Tuesday, Oct. 16.”

  • DCist reports, Christopher Hitchens’ God Is Not Great “was named one of five finalists for the National Book Award for nonfiction.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “A New Bobble Joins the Debate”

  • PEJ Talk Show Index for the week of Sept. 20 through Oct. 5 shows, “While the rest of the media were focused on private security contractors in Iraq last week, the cable and radio talk hosts spent their time continuing to argue over a controversial phrase by Rush Limbaugh. Plus, another remnant of the Anna Nicole Smith saga makes the top-10 list.”

  • Ralph Hanson writes, “So I was surprised to read that progressive political commentary magazine New Republic decided that an illustration they had commissioned to go with an article about cussing was too offensive to print. The illustration depicts a wide range of offensive terms for sex and excretory functions, along with their more proper acceptable terms. The main link above is to an article from SF Weekly about the article and illustration. And they print the controversial illustration. Be forewarned. The illustration has lots of words on it that you may or may not find offensive.”

  • And from SF Weekly, “New Republic won’t run Ward Schumacker’s illustration along with story about cussing”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “NBC Universal is dropping the curtain on ‘beautiful downtown Burbank.’ The media company, which made the town of tract houses the butt of endless jokes, but also brought it prominence as the base of ‘The Tonight Show,’ is decamping to nearby Universal Studios. The media company announced today that it will sell much of the 34 acres it owns in Burbank, including the legendary NBC Studios at 3000 W. Alameda Ave.”

  • Media Post reports, “Many Wall Street analysts are lowering earnings expectations for CBS Corp. as they anticipate the worst for the advertising-dependent, pure-play broadcaster being squeezed by shaky program ratings and a soft advertising market. But those warnings may not go far enough.”

  • CNet News.com reports, “Everyone knows Nielsen as the company that measures how many people are glued to their TV sets watching news and sitcoms for what is called Fall Sweeps. The numbers can make or break a new show.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Officer Robert Iger and other media executives urged U.S. regulators to reject a push by Microsoft Corp. and Google Inc. to free some television airwaves for mobile Internet access.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Polish those resumes, kids. ABC News is now offering PAID internships. ABC News hires 75-80 interns every semester. ABC says the interns will earn ‘an hourly wage consistent with media industry standards.’ Probably enough to rent a nice place in Tribeca for the semester.”

  • Inside Cable News points out, “More FNC Blogs.”

  • Mark Gimein writes for Time, “Crack for Journalists: The Economics of Blogging”

  • From “The Long Goodbye Dept.” over at Wonkette check out this and this.

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Half a century ago, sociologist David Riesman noted that in a mass media age, journalists tend to be cheerleaders for political candidates who have the charisma of entertainers. Reporters do this not because they believe the better entertainer will be the better president, but simply because entertaining candidates draw a bigger crowd for the media’s own product — the news.”

  • Business Week’s Media Centric writes, “Don’t Kill the Nightly News. Really”

  • The Daily Northwestern reports, “Jim Lehrer, the host of PBS’s ‘The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer,’ discussed journalism, and the ‘revolution’ within it Wednesday afternoon in the half-full McCormick Auditorium in Norris University Center.”

  • Discovery to buy HowStuffWorks.com

  • Daily Candy looks at Wolfgang Puck’s new restaurant, The Source.

    Jobs

  • Bright Young Things is looking for contributors.

  • The Hartford Courant is seeking a new Washington Reporter.

  • Reuters is looking for Journalism Interns in Washington DC for Summer 2008.

  • The Daily Progress is seeking a copy editor/page designer.

  • Smithsonian Magazine is looking for an Editorial Assistant and an Assistant Editor.

  • The Washington Monthly is looking for Interns.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Money & Politics Reporter.

  • Pew Research Center is looking for a Communications/Administrative Assistant.

  • La Politica is looking for a Reporter.

  • Biblical Archaeology Society is looking for an Editor.

  • The Nation is looking for a Senior Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 09.20.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Your bet is on Stephen Colbert over Jon Stewart in a fist fight.

  • Roll Call’s Moira Bagley celebrates a birthday today.

  • Media Matter’s Eric Boehlert reports, “Last Monday, on the same day that Gen. David Petraeus was testifying before Congress about how important progress was being made in Iraq, the Pentagon announced that nine American service members had died that day in Iraq. Given the death toll to date, the sad notice did not qualify as a blockbuster development. But such a high number of dead service members in one 24-hour span certainly qualified as news, especially on a day when so much attention had been trained on Iraq inside Washington, D.C., including its newsrooms. Yet among the four all-news cable channels (CNN, CNN Headline News, Fox, and MSNBC) last week, there were just two mentions of the nine dead soldiers, according to TVEyes.com.”

  • “CHBN is proud to announce the launch of our latest innovation for our growing politically active community. Our interactive ads give our viewers an immediate call to action and collect critical data from supporters directly from your videos.”

  • Tom Shales can only watch four screens at once.

  • This article claims that UPI is anti-gay. It is “owned by the media-arm of Rev. Sun Myung Moon’s Unification Church. Moon himself has also called for the destruction of LGBT people. In a speech in 1997 he said: ‘What is the meaning of lesbians and homosexuals? That is the place where all different kinds of dung collect. We have to end that behaviour. When this kind of dirty relationship is taking place between human beings, God cannot be happy.’”

  • USNews.com reports, “The Wikipedia model makes it tempting to see the site as a battleground for legions of political junkies making the case for or against a candidate. As the Post writes, ‘every day thousands of them are engaging in fierce battles over the life stories of the 2008 presidential candidates.’ The data tell a different story. Figures provided to U.S. News Monday by Compete.com, a site that monitors and analyzes Internet traffic, show that the majority of the edits to most of the candidate pages are made by a small group of devoted editors who largely determine what information is and is not included on a page.”

  • The National Press Club’s Professional Development Committee is hosting a panel event on blogging on the campaign trail. The panelists include Tom Edsall, The New Republic; Jonathan Martin, Politico; Antonio Vargas, The Washington Post; and David All, GOP adviser. Ellen Shearer, co-director of the Medill News Service, will moderate. To RSVP to the September 24 event, call (202) 662-7501.

  • A follow up to this post…A tipster tells us, “one journalist — portuguese, i think — was turned away from the same event due to the white house press dress code. he was wearing sandals. i guess women can bare feet but men can’t.”

  • Reuters reports, “CBS Corp is happy with its deal with iTunes and won’t join a battle against Apple Inc over the pricing of television shows on the online store, CBS Chief Executive Les Moonves said on Tuesday.”

  • B&C reports, “Fox Business Network will rely heavily on The Wall Street Journal work force for commentary and color, Rupert Murdoch told a room full of investors at the Goldman Sachs Communacopia conference here Tuesday morning, and the channel will appeal to a broader audience than CNBC when it debuts next month.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Andy Berndt, co-president of Ogilvy & Mather’s New York office, has left his post at the agency to go to Google, where he will helm a new global unit dedicated to collaborating with marketers, agencies and entertainment companies.”

  • Venture Beat reports, “Today, Comscore released numbers showing GodTube, a YouTube for Christians, to be the fastest growing site on the internet in August. It grew 973 percent and ranked among the top 1000 web properties by unique visitors — the same month it officially launched, as Mashable’s Kristen Nicole points out.”

  • Business Week reports, “When Jay Adelson and Kevin Rose launched Digg three years ago, the Web site attracted a community of like-minded people. Digg users were technophiles, not unlike the company’s founders. Rather than pay attention to the news dominating the national headlines, many early Digg users were more apt to respond to articles that Rose posted on new Web companies, open-source software, and even stories about mental illness that can haunt mathematicians after they solve complex puzzle.”

  • U.S. presidential campaigns are increasingly favoring bloggers over traditional news media with breaking news, some observers say.

  • Reuters reports, “News Corp chief Rupert Murdoch on Tuesday sketched out early plans for Dow Jones & Co Inc, saying he leaned toward making the online Wall Street Journal free but had not yet made a decision.”

  • Media Ink reports, “We hear that some folks at McGraw-Hill are getting a little nervous about a new tome about former GE chief Jack Welch that’s being written by former Welch speech writer Bill Lane.”

  • Jack Myers writes, “Betsy Frank the chief research and insights officer for Time Inc., offers an interesting perspective on the state of magazine advertising today and how media companies are both applying and ignoring lessons of the past. The key question for media companies, Frank suggests, is ‘how can media, whether invented yesterday or 100 years ago, create and maintain relevance to consumers and demonstrate and communicate that value to advertisers?’”

  • The 2007 American Spectator Annual Pig Roast is coming up! It is September 29 in Madison, Virginia.

  • Tom Sietsema reveals in his online chat that his fall dining guide is out October 14.

  • There is a “new breed of news junkie” on the loose in Chevy Chase.

  • Linda Perlstein writes, “When I left a reporting job at The Washington Post several years ago, I lost an institution I loved—not to mention free LexisNexis and an affiliation that pretty much guaranteed that my phone calls were returned right away. But I gained the opportunity to immerse myself in a project that I’m sure could never have been created for the newspaper.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc. Chief Executive Officer Richard Parsons said the media company’s board will decide on the timing for Jeffrey Bewkes to succeed him.”

  • As a follow up to Deborah Howell’s column about the controversy over comics in the Washington Post (and other papers), Ralph Hanson put together a round up of items about comic strip controversies since 2004.

  • Check out the results of the CJR panel, “The Case of the Vanishing Book Review”

  • American University’s Center for Social Media presents Foreign Correspondence and the Future of Public Media, “a series that addresses the future of reliable, sober, unbiased information from abroad at a time when our nation is engaged in two foreign wars — and when the number of mainstream foreign correspondents is actually diminishing. The series, organized by AU’s Bill Gentile, is comprised of internationally-recognized foreign correspondents. Each speaker brings unique and valuable insight into the current state of foreign correspondence, and especially its future.” Each lecture is in the University’s Mary Graydon Center Room 324, from 12:45 until 2 pm.

  • Poynter Online reports, “It’s pretty much a foregone conclusion that WSJ.com will be free soon.”

  • The Duke Cunningham case will be discussed during 2007 SPJ Convention & Journalism Conference. For more info, click here.

  • No more wondering. The editors of TNR offer a Scott Beauchamp Update.

  • Community Journalism Interest Group writes, “There has been very little coverage of the New York Times’ decision to cut the space it allots for printed letters in its paper edition. That’s a shame. The move further exemplifies the disdain the ‘mainstream’ media has for its audience, and, by extension, the communities they serve.”

  • Daily Kos has a piece of advice for the Politico: “Memo to Jim VandeHei and John Harris: this is 2007, not 1992.”

  • Web 2.Oh … really reports, “This from Maureen Dowd’s column in the New York Times, which has finally been liberated from behind the pay wall the company had built around its marquee columnists under its ill-fated TimesSelect plan: ‘Nobody wants to simply admit they made a mistake and disappear for awhile. Nobody even wants to use the weasel words: ‘Mistakes were made.’ No, far better to pop right back up and get in the face of those who were savoring your absence.’ Such a striking confession about her employer’s embarrassing capitulation to reality! From such a proud woman! Oh, wait, my mistake. The column’s about Alan Greenspan’s new book.”

  • The Huffington Post is hiring journalist Marc Cooper to head up its OffTheBus citizen journalism project. Cooper, a columnist for LA Weekly, will work with approximately 15 “campaign correspondents” to cover the 2008 campaigns from their own perspectives.

  • In response to this post…A reader tells us, “‘A strong internal candidate has emerged; if you are interested in this or future National bureau jobs, please contact’ That actually means…don’t bother applying we have already picked someone but we are legally required to post this notice”

    Jobs

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Business News Desk person.

  • WWICS — Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies is looking for a Public Affairs Specialist.

  • Times Community Newspapers is looking for a Reporter and a Photographer.

  • Energy Intelligence Group is looking for a Market Reporter.

  • Human Rights Campaign is seeking a Sr. Editorial & Web Content Manager.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 06.19.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • An ABC News release announced that the network received seven Edward R. Murrow Awards from the Radio-Television News Directors Association. “ABC News Radio was recognized with six awards and ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ won for best feature reporting.”

  • An NBC release announced, “NBC News has been honored with seven 2007 Edward R. Murrow Awards, more than any other television network. … NBC News was honored with the esteemed Murrow Award for Overall Excellence. In addition, ‘Dateline NBC’ won three awards for Best Feature: Hard News, Best Investigative Reporting, and Best Videography. ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ received two Murrow Awards for Best Newscast and Best Spot Coverage. NBC’s ‘Today’ won one Murrow for Best Writing.”

  • Emma Schwartz is leaving the Legal Times to join U.S. News & World Report as an associate editor.

  • Online Media Daily reports, “In addition to news aggregators like Google and Yahoo, newspapers need to watch out for online competition from a less obvious source — social networks. That’s according to a global study of youth media behavior commissioned by the World Association of Newspapers and performed by research firm D-Code.”

  • Google launched its new policy blog on Monday.

  • NewsBusters looks into Chris Matthews’ comment, “Okay, this country was built on biased reporting.”

  • Andrew Ferguson, senior editor of the conservative Weekly Standard, told Deb Howell of his Al Gore snafu, “I’m mortified about this. It was incredibly stupid.”

  • Wonkette says, “Happy 35th Anniversary, Watergate Burglary!”

  • On Friday’s Corn and Miniter Show, GOP strategist Doug Heye discussed the 2008 campaign and racial politics.

  • Dr. Ralph Hanson is back after finishing the second edition of his book, Mass Communication: Living in a Media World, and now he has the scoop from the National Association of Hispanic Journalists annual conference.

  • FT.com reports, “Winning over a minority of users of MySpace, Facebook and similar websites could hold the key to turning the social networking internet phenomenon into a viable medium for advertisers. Only 8 per cent of internet users regularly upload the video clips, blogs and other content which draws millions to social websites, according to Agency.com, the international digital agency.”

  • Rev. Moon’s Spanish newspaper — Tiempos del Mundo — is closing and will put out its last edition at the end of the month.

  • A reader tells us, “Mark Segraves’ ‘Laptop’ reports were selected as this year’s Robert D.G. Lewis Watchdog Award winner. The judges select one Lewis Award each year an applicant whose entry best exemplifies journalism aimed at protecting the public from abuses by those who would betray the public trust.” Word is he used some of his award money to buy pizza for the entire newsroom.

  • A reader writes in, “Woah.. You mentioned NPR as a Murrow winner, but didn’t note that ABC News Radio took SIX Murrows — six awards that NPR didn’t win. CBS Radio won 3. But high-and-mighty NPR only got ONE.”

  • “The American Society of Business Publications (ASBPE) named 20 magazines as the nation’s best business-to-business publications as part of its 2006-7 Azbee Awards of Excellence competition.” Check out more details here.

  • Free Ride reports, “Silver Spring residents hoping their busy Montgomery County hub will draw National Public Radio away from its current Mount Vernon Square-based headquarters in the District are frustrated with members of the Montgomery County Council who they say are anti-development.”

  • The Employee Benefit Research Institute announced, “Public service announcements featuring ‘Savingsman,’ the high-flying champion of saving and planning for retirement, have received three 2007 Emmy awards from the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.”

  • Inside the Pentagon Senior Correspondent Elaine Grossman has won three separate prizes for her Dec. 7, 2006, article, “U.S. Officers in Iraq: Insurgents are Repeatedly Captured And Released.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “the 30-second TV spot is imperiled as never before. Its competition: A dizzying array of digital and Internet options, many of which produce instant results and valuable consumer data, something that TV ads cannot.”

  • AP reports, “ABC News has apologized for mistakenly running a picture of former Washington Mayor Marion Barry when it was promoting a ‘World News’ story about a man suing a dry cleaner for $54 million for losing his pants.”

  • A reader writes in: “At least one sharp-eyed journophile was left speculating about a sighting today at the high-fallutin’ Towers Club at Tyson’s Corner. The woman, who obviously keeps her crib sheet close at hand, recognized three Virginians heading into a private conference room at the Towers. The three were former Virginia governor Chuck Robb; local media powerhouse Nick Arundel (who publishes the Times Community Newspapers); and national security journalist Susan Katz Keating. ‘Must be working on some big media project,’ the woman speculated. Actually, the three were attending a board meeting of the National Museum of Americans at War. All three serve on the board of directors of the forthcoming museum, which will be built in Northern Virginia.”

  • B&C reports, “Comedy Central’s Jon Stewart might be next on the Peacock’s wish list. NBC Universal President/Chief Executive Jeff Zucker and NBC Entertainment/Universal Media Studios Co-Chair Marc Graboff recently wined and dined the satirical news anchor and his agent, James Dixon. According to a network source, Zucker and Graboff didn’t focus on pitching any specific role at the dinner meeting. ‘They just made their interest known in finding a way to do business together if Jon was ever available,’ says the source, who categorized the talks as ‘exploratory.’”

  • NY Daily News reports, “Opie and Anthony returned to XM Satellite Radio Friday with less furor than they sparked when they were suspended 30 days earlier.”

  • New York Post reports, “Tina Brown, basking in the glow of her hot-selling Princess Diana book, appears to be so over the magazine business. … Rather, the 57-year-old editor sounds like she’s leaning toward a possible leap to cyberspace.”

  • MediaBistro introduces the “Fastest Three Minutes In Media, mediabistro.com’s first-ever video newscast — a quick look at the week’s most compelling media stories — featuring Amy Palmer (who can be seen on NYCTV’s NY 360) and shot and edited by Matt Huard.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Both The Wall Street Journal and USA Today are developing glossy magazines for distribution within their traditional newsprint flagships, according to company executives and media buyers familiar with the work.”

  • “The National Press Foundation is pleased to report that we matched our $25,000 Challenge Grant from the Knight, Ford, and Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundations. We raised more than $34,000 from individual donors, of which $28,000 qualified for our match.”

  • New York Times reports, “On Thursday for the first time, Page Six — which no longer runs on the sixth page of the paper, nor on just a single page — occupied three pages.”

  • E&P reports, “The New York Times again topped other newspapers in Web traffic in May, according to Nielsen//NetRatings. It reports that nytimes.com had 12,755,000 unique visitors in May compared to 13,735,000 in April.”

  • AP reports, “Gannett Co., publisher of USA Today, said Monday revenue slid 6 percent in May on continued classified advertising weakness and broadcasting declines.”

  • From the San Francisco Chronicle: “Three books consider the current state of journalism and its future in a landscape dominated by the Internet”

    Jobs

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Business News Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 04.24.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • What do Tony Kornheiser and Scooter Libby have in common? Admittedly not much, but they did both make The Phoenix’s List of 100 Unsexiest Men, 2007.

  • Reuters reports, “The Huffington Post political blog has signed on Web media company Yahoo Inc. and online news site Slate to help host two debates among presidential hopefuls ahead of the 2008 election.”

  • The Washingtonian has more coverage from the WHCA parties here .

  • Lawmakers Urge Bush to Reconsider Broadcasting Cuts

  • Magazines, Online And Off

  • Helena Andrews reviews the fashion from the WHCA Dinner and says, “The original Wonkette, Ana Marie Cox, wore an emerald green reflective ensemble that might have looked better on the set of ‘Wicked.’” Then again, Andrews thinks Los Angeles is a great city so we’re suspicious of her judgment…

  • Rem Rieder writes, “I have two major objections to the dinner. The first is that it suggests a coziness between newsmakers and the people who cover them that just isn’t healthy. … The other problem is the carnival aspect, the competition for the get, the parade of (sort of) celebs, the coveted after-party tickets.”

  • Today, American University’s School of Communication is hosting its Finale Reception for its Mentoring Program and they are expecting a few big-name alumni/DC media including CBS News’ 48 Hours Investigates producer Susan Zirinsky, NBC 4 anchor Wendy Rieger and XM Satellite Radio’s Bob Edwards.

  • Julie Mason shows us just why the stakeout can sometimes be a bit anti-climatic.

  • A reader tells us, “If we were to follo Bruce Johnson’s well-meaning criterion, there would be no day for celebration. Each festivity would be canceled on a daily basis, based on Darfur alone. Let us remember the victims, but let us also go on living. The victims would want us to, while remembering them. It is people like Cho who would want to rob us of even these perhaps frivolous but joyful celebrations.”

  • Ralph Hanson points out that the Post “crossed a new diversity barrier” last week — “not interracial dating, they’ve done that a time or two; not gay dating — no lesbians yet, but one male-male date. No, this time they had a man in a wheelchair and a woman who was not.”

  • In one reader’s opinion, “The Politico.com redesign is awesome — the new features are full of great info and it’s much easier to navigate through the stories.” Vandi — is that you?

  • Gawker reports that near “catfight” broke out at John McLaughlin’s post-White House Correspondent’s Dinner brunch between Ana Marie Cox and Eric Alterman. “Cox confronted Alterman about recent comments he had made concerning Time’s recent hirings, specifically, the hiring of Cox.”

  • Reason Editor-in-Chief Nick Gillespie talked with National Journal’s Jonathan Rauch “about the 2008 presidential race, the Iraq War, the state of contemporary journalism, and more.”

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • NEXT PAGE >>