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Posts Tagged ‘Richard Just’

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Front Page of the Day                                                                     What’s Happening

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— Sen. Marco Rubio speaks about his ideas for economic growth at 1:30 p.m.

— Monday Night Author Series with Dan Balz at Bethesda Blues and Jazz Club at 7:30 p.m.

 

The Revolving Door

— Marjorie Censer starts at Politico Pro

— Richard Just and Emma Roller start at National Journal Mag

 

Fishbowl Fun Fact

William McKinley had a parrot named Washington Post, which he named the official greeter of the White House.

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NJ Adds to Magazine, Energy Staff

National Journal’s Editor-in-Chief Tim Grieve announced today that they have hired a managing editor to oversee their magazine. Amanda Cormier comes on board as Editor Richard Just and Deputy Editor Andie Coller begin their redesign of NJ mag. She previously wrote for the online magazine BKLYNR, and has also worked at the New Yorker.

Two more hires were announced as well. Jason Plautz will be the new energy reporter. He is currently a reporter at Environment and Energy News after having worked at Inside Climate News and Sports Illustrated. And Emma Roller will come on board from Slate as part of NJ‘s wire team. She edited and wrote for Slate’s Weigel and Moneybox blogs, and has also interned at NPR and the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Roller starts on Monday, and Cormier and Plautz will start later in the month.

NJ Is Totally Psyched to Get Richard Just

As we reported earlier today, Richard Just has just been brought on as editor of National Journal’s magazine. And if this internal memo from Editor in Chief Tim Grieve is any indication, NJ feels they’ve scored quite a coup. Grieve is clearly stoked to bring Just on board, and though he acknowledges that Just and Deputy Editor Andie Coller have a lot of work to do to “reinvent” the mag, he also promises that “they’re going to have all the resources to do it right.”

From the memo:

This is major. Richard is one of the best magazine editors in the country. He was the editor of Newsweek.  Before that, he was the editor of The New Republic. He comes to us with the strongest possible endorsements from some of the nation’s most accomplished magazine writers. And he comes to us brimming with ideas for making National Journal the most vibrant, most compelling, most essential policy-and-politics magazine anywhere.

Someone’s ears must be burning! Read the whole memo after the jump…

Read more

Following Website Redesign, NJ Hires Richard Just to “Reengineer” Mag

National Journal Editor-in-Chief Tim Grieve announced today that Richard Just will be the new editor of National Journal magazine.

Just was most recently editor of Newsweek, and before that, The New Republic. He will lead the magazine through a redesign this spring with Deputy Magazine Editor Andie Coller. He will also oversee the hiring of additional staff editors and reporters over the next several months.

“It’s an exciting time to join National Journal given the opportunity and resources on hand to be bold and creative while maintaining the foundation on which this venerable brand was built nearly 50 years ago,” Just said.  “As we reengineer the magazine, our focus will be on making it a source for long-form writing about politics that is enlightening, challenging, informative, and (as all great magazine journalism should be) truly fun to read.”

Just’s first day is March 10. Congratulations Richard!

Just In, Foer Out (and About)

TNR has just released the statement on Richard Just‘s jump to Editor and Franklin Foer‘s move to Editor-at-Large.

Still developing…

WASHINGTON, D.C. – December 8, 2010 – The New Republic announced today that Richard Just has been promoted to editor. Franklin Foer, editor since 2006, has been named editor-at-large. Richard Just joined The New Republic in 2004 as online editor. Since then, he has directed editorial across platforms, also serving as deputy editor, managing editor, and most recently, executive editor. Before joining TNR, he was editor of The American Prospect Online and a writing fellow at The American Prospect.

“It goes without saying that it’s an honor to be at the helm of TNR, which I was devoted to as a reader long before I ever worked here,” said Just. “I want TNR to be the place that proves that the best attributes of magazine journalism—long-form narrative and argument, brilliant cultural criticism, and passionate and informed crusading—can flourish in the new age of journalism, and reach far more readers than ever before.”

Laurence Grafstein, chairman of The New Republic Advisory Board, said, “Richard has been essential to TNR’s editorial accomplishments and recent overall success. The board is especially enthusiastic about his vision for the company and his ability to manage and develop the magazine’s core editorial operations. Frank will retain a key  role, and the board is enormously grateful for the unparalleled leadership and journalistic excellence he has  provided TNR for the last five years. Frank has shepherded the magazine and website through conditions of  turbulence in all corners of the media industry and put the institution in as strong a position as ever.”

Foer will remain at the center of TNR’s editorial operations, covering politics and the 2012 elections for The New Republic’s print and online properties, and will be working on a narrative history of the birth of American liberalism. It will be published by HarperCollins in 2013.

More on Foer after the jump…

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TNR’s Art and Literary Characters

TNR‘s Literary Editor Leon Wieseltier’s ears must have been burning up last night. Well before he arrived to The Phillips Collection to give a talk on a John Constable oil painting, colleagues gabbed about what a character he is – a few mentioned, for example, his penchant for blasting music at the office. One day it’s Rihanna, the next it’s opera.

Leon doesn’t disappoint. He shows up and people magnetically gravitate toward him. Or was it his hair? He has a spectacular head of shoulder-length, silky, white-gold fluff that makes him a stand-out in any crowd, but especially this well-coiffed, stylish mix.

“I don’t want that on WikiLeaks,” he deadpanned after I snapped his picture.

Later during the talk: “It’s very hard to peel back the familiarity of the work,” he tells a rapt audience stuck on his every word. “It’s a spiritual exercise. When you can do it, great things happen.”

The talk was part of TNR’s co-hosted After 5 dim sum party at The Phillips Collection. Chinatown’s Ping Pong catered the delectable cuisine with shrimp toast among its offerings. Also there to give a talk was the magazine’s Art Critic Jed Perl.

Perl, in from Manhattan, in a tailored brown corduroy blazer and skinny pants, is no slouch alongside Wieseltier. He’s thankfully game to dissect The Devil Wears Prada. He wrote for Vogue in the 80s and reminisced with FishbowlDC about what it was like to be Anna Wintour‘s Art Editor. “She was easy to work with,” he said, explaining she could be shy, not snobby. Of Meryl Streep’s character in the movie, he says, “She doesn’t just play icy bitch. It’s more complex than that.” And so is Wintour. He said she understood him perfectly, is “incredibly smart” and knew his ideal place within the publication. He surmised, “I think she gets a bum rap because she’s a woman. I have a deep respect for her.”

Find out who else attended the party after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 01.15.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Wikipedia. (See King’s Wikipedia entry here.)

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think Hillary Clinton was “edgy” on “Meet”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Washington Business Journal reports, “Gannett Co. Inc. has named the chief executive of online ad company PointRoll Inc. to be its new chief digital officer, as it seeks to expand its online operations. Chris Saridakis, who was named PointRoll chief executive after McLean-based Gannett acquired the company two years ago, will oversee digital operations at Gannett’s newspapers and television stations. He will report directly to Gannett chief executive Craig Dubow.”

  • J. Peter Freire is the new Managing Editor of The American Spectator. Freire first came to the Spectator as an intern and editorial assistant under a journalism fellowship from the Intercollegiate Studies Institute.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • The real Dowd scandal

  • Washington Post’s Deb Howell writes, “Here’s what happened in New Hampshire: Reporters lost their natural skepticism and took what they thought was happening and projected it far past the facts. The experts were wrong, the polling a disaster. The Post, luckily, didn’t poll late in New Hampshire and wasn’t among those making a bad call.”

  • The Virginian-Pilot’s Joyce Hoffman writes, “Coming on board as public editor with the news that Landmark Communications, and with it The Virginian-Pilot, is likely to be sold is a daunting endeavor. An end to the century-old tradition of leadership by a family with a historic commitment to public service journalism is a troubling prospect for Hampton Roads.”

  • Richard Just writes, “What happened at the Supreme Court 20 years ago tomorrow has been long forgotten by most Americans — if they ever heard about it at all. Unlike the better-known decisions of the last century, the ruling handed down on Jan. 13, 1988, had nothing to do with race or abortion rights. It didn’t become fodder for presidential candidates and hasn’t galvanized voters on either the left or right. Yet over the past two decades, the court’s ruling in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, which concerned high school newspapers, has had far-reaching consequences. Not only has it changed the way journalism is taught at many schools, it has made it more difficult for high school students to learn the important lessons about democracy that come from publishing — or simply reading — serious newspapers.”

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    TV

  • A release announced, “MSNBC presents special live coverage
    … of the Michigan primary, as well as the Democratic presidential debate live from Nevada. Coverage begins with ‘Hardball with
    Chris Matthews’ live from Las Vegas at 5 and 7 p.m. ET, ‘Tucker’ live at 6 p.m. ET and ‘Countdown with Keith Olbermann’ at 8 p.m. ET.”

  • A CNN release announced the network “will dedicate the 8 p.m. hour each weekday to the latest election news coverage from the campaign trail in a new program, CNN Election Center. Building on CNN’s successes and ratings wins from both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primaries, CNN Election Center will be anchored by members of the ‘Best Political Team on Television’ from the New York-based CNN Election Center and on the trail by CNN anchor John Roberts.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Broadcasting & Cable published an editorial today that served as a call to the networks to focus more energy on presidential news coverage. It also applauded ABC News for its debate coverage, which rated extremely well, and its New Hampshire special, which didn’t, but was the only network that gave the primary a half-hour.”

  • The Washington Times reports, “A legal battle over advertisements for a new documentary about Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton illustrates the folly of current campaign-finance laws, says the attorney for the producers of the film, which premieres tonight in Washington. ‘Hillary: The Movie’ is ‘a political documentary like Michael Moore or Al Gore has made,’ said James Bopp, who went to federal court last week to represent the movie’s producers. Yet the conservative group Citizens United, which produced the Clinton film, must ‘go to court to get permission to advertise the film… because of McCain-Feingold,’ he said.”

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “If you saw John Kerry on ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ Sunday morning, you saw him talking about his endorsement of Barack Obama. And you probably also saw him successfully pull off a tough stunt — banning something he didn’t want from the show.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Rep. Ron Paul took part in last Thursday’s GOP debate on Fox News after being excluded in the New Hampshire forum. His supporters were, well, less than happy with Fox News over the decision to leave out Paul from the N.H. forum, as Frank Luntz explained.”

  • TVNewser reports that MSNBC announced in a press release how it plans to handle hosting a debate and covering the Michigan primary tonight. The debate will take place at 9 p.m.
  • PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler writes, “The press, the pundits and the polls all got a big black eye this week after forecasting, with considerable certainty, a big victory for Sen. Barack Obama in the Democratic primary in New Hampshire. Much has already been written and broadcast about this episode. Newspapers and television networks have had stories about how everybody got it wrong and what the various reasons may have been. I don’t have much to add to this other than to wonder if individual news organizations — aside from their obvious, next-day follow-up stories — took some time to conduct their own in-house post-mortems to figure out if this glaring error in polling and news judgment should alter in some fundamental way the manner in which they approach political coverage. It’s not as though it hasn’t happened before.”

  • This Wednesday at Nathan’s Q&A cafe will feature Amy Holmes, described as “a three-fer: female, black and republican. There’s not much we won’t be able to politically slice and dice.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Hotline’s On Call is covering the Michigan primary live tonight.

  • Poynter’s Steve Klein reports, “No one has been more supportive of bloggers and more critical of mainstream media than Ted Leonsis, the former AOL executive who owns the NHL Washington Capitals. (OK, well maybe Mark Cuban is close.) Leonsis has paid to send independent bloggers to cover Caps prospects in Russia, and when long-time Washington Times hockey writer Dave Fay died late last year, no one was kinder. So when Leonsis shelled out $124 million over 13 years last week to keep his franchise player, Alex Ovechkin, in town — it was the biggest contract in Washington D.C. sports history — Leonsis had a right to expect some accurate coverage in the MSM and some honest passion from the bloggers. But to read the owner’s very active blog, Ted’s Take, it doesn’t appear he got a great deal of either.”

  • Christopher Hitchens Watch reports that Hitchens has quit smoking. No, really.

  • Be sure to c heck out Breitbart TV. Ed Driscoll reports, “About a minute into the latest B-Cast by Liz Stephans and Scott Baker of Breitbart.TV (whom we interviewed a few weeks ago on PJM Political), they casually mention that their previous show attracted about 400,000 views.”

  • Marc Fisher reports, “Living in a city without a full-time jazz station, I have to rely on CDs and downloads to hear my fill of Miles Davis and John Coltrane. But to discover new jazz from singer Madeleine Peyroux or pianist Bruce Barth, it’s necessary to reach past broadcast radio to online music services, music blogs and pay satellite radio. But now comes NPR Music, a sprawling Web site from National Public Radio on which I can listen to the NPR jazz (or classical or folk or indie rock) shows that don’t air on Washington’s public stations — as well as tap into song lists, video and audio of concerts, music-related stories from NPR’s news shows and a raft of programs from public stations across the country.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Wonkette reports, “Campaigns & Elections magazine was one of those old insider trade magazines for people that simply couldn’t get enough of campaign tactics and other campaigners in the off-season — but there’s nary an off-season anymore. So, C&E redesigned the magazine (it’s shiny!), started writing about politics and threw a swanky party with an open bar in a big black room to celebrate.” For pics, click here.

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    RADIO

  • Former CBS Public Eye editor Matthew Felling is hosting “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today at noon on WAMU 88.5, talking Macs and Movies.

  • The Redskins’ Tumultuous Season Didn’t Gain Yardage on Sports Radio

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    JOBS

  • CommunicationWorks is looking for a Media Manager.

  • mediabistro.com is looking for mediabistro.com Instructors.

  • Widmeyer Communications is looking for an Account Manager and a Senior Associate/Assistant Vice President.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Technology Writer.

  • WTOP Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • WFED Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • AARP is looking for a Managing Editor — AARP Bulletin.

  • SourceMedia is looking for a Reporter, The Bond Buyer/Washington Bureau.

  • Strauss Radio Strategies, Inc. is seeking PR Pros Specializing in Broadcast.

  • Youth Today is looking for a Publisher and a Managing Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext