TVNewser FishbowlNY AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Steve Klein’

Morning Reading List, 02.07.08

4345057.jpg
Good morning Washington. Ashton Kutcher turns 30 today!

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | JOBS

  • On Tuesday night, most of you watched NBC/MSNBC.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • An Industry Imperiled by Falling Profits and Shrinking Ads

  • Poynter Online’s Steve Klein reports, “Focus groups are not uncommon in the media. Newspapers, for instance, need to be asking readers what they want. It’s one thing to play the traditional gatekeeper role in news coverage — but ignoring reader input and interaction is a formula for disaster in the first decade of the 21st century. Still, I was intrigued by this item somewhat buried on page 2 of the Washington Post’s always interesting Health section (even though I doubt I am their target demographic). In a little two-item feature called ‘Tell Us About …’, the Post asked for the following input about ‘Your Paper’: ‘What’s your dream version of the Post’s print edition? What would compel you to pick it up every day and keep you from putting it down? A Post readership committee is soliciting ideas from women [oops, not me!] ages 18 to 49 with children younger than 18 at home.’”

  • Think the media is biased? Head to the Reed Irvine Accuracy in Media Award cermeony tonight at the Omni Shoreham Hotel

    Top of post

    TV

  • A Confused Sam Donaldson Chats With Perez Hilton

  • Broken Fox Boycott Leaves Dems Looking Dumb”

  • Networks run a heated campaign for viewers

  • Retirement Living Television to Rent Some ABC News D.C. Space

  • Broadcast Nets Fizzle With Election Coverage

  • John Zogby “After Super Tuesday

  • The press seethes over Bill Clinton, shrugs at George Bush

  • CNN’s Cautious Projections

  • Record Number Watch Super Tuesday on Cable. CNN Comes In First

  • 23/6 points out that Bill Hemmer has the “awesomest electoral map ever”

  • Boston Globe reports, “It was an election night with as many moving parts as there were moving graphics on a Fox News Channel screen. Indeed, the best metaphor for Super Tuesday coverage last night was probably that Fox ticker, filled with so many measures of counting – raw totals, percentages, delegate counts — that it threatened to overtake the screen and cover the analysts’ heads.”

  • CNN Upsets Fox News For Ratings Win In Most-Watched Super Tuesday Ever

  • The New York Observer takes a look at the process behind Chris Matthews.

  • The New York Times reports, “On the biggest day of nominating contests ever, in the most exciting and closely watched election in years, television had to hold back. It was almost a painful sight: at times, anchors and commentators on Tuesday looked a little like children on Halloween who, after getting sick on candy one year, were forced to surrender their loot the next.”

  • Baltimore Sun reports, “Network and cable TV channels amped up the star power last night as presidential politics took over prime time. But in this age of rapidly expanding media, the news operations that did best were the ones that emphasized information and technology over personality.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • AOL’s online advertising acquisitions: Small and strategic

  • Time Warner may shed AOL unit and cable

  • USC Annenberg Online Journalism Review reports, “Imagine a place where journalists could pitch stories as soon as they hit ‘save.’ Where editors could snap them up just as quickly for printing in tomorrow’s paper. Imagine a reporting network built on trust, where both editors and journalists could accrete bodies of work tagged with endorsements and feedback. Is an eBay of news viable? And ultimately, will it deliver news to readers more quickly and more cheaply? A pair of young entrepreneurs — she’s a graduating Berkeley journalism school student and he’s a former engineer for Amazon — have combined expertises to create one such vehicle: Reporterist.com.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Fox News Chicago picked a heck of a day to launch its cool news Web site LiveNewsCameras.com. As the site launched, snowstorms and other severe weather threatened several parts of the country, Super Tuesday news was starting to come in, and the Dow dropped 300 points. And you could watch video of all that on one site.”

  • For those of you that caught Sarah Silverman’s YouTube video where she claims, “I’m f*cking Matt Damon”, well she hints that Snapple may have had something to do with this. Anyway, Snapple, feeling bad about their role in this sordid affair, sent a letter to Silverman’s boyfriend, Jimmy Kimmel: “Heard that you found out about Sarah f*cking Matt Damon. Sorry you had to find out that way and that my sublime flavor blinded you to Sarah’s philandering ways. In an attempt to console you, here’s a whole lotta me for you to enjoy. Hopefully it will numb the pain. In fact, if your viewers want to share their girlfriend/boyfriend is f*cking someone else story on air, they can have a case of me too… Anyway, keep your spirits up. It’s not like she was f*cking Ben Affleck or anything. Now that would have been embarrassing.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Agra Informa Inc. is looking for an Editor in Chief.

  • Inside Higher Ed is looking for a Higher Education Reporter.

  • Express/The Washington Post Co. is looking for an Assistant Art Director.

  • Bisnow on Business is looking for mobile journalists.

  • Stars and Stripes is looking for a Supervisory Archivist.

  • American University School of Communication is offering an Investigative Journalism Fellowship.

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN-Newsperson.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Mediabistro Course

    Freelancing 101

    Freelancing 101Manage a top-notch freelancing career in our online boot camp, Freelancing 101! Starting August 18, freelancing experts will teach you the best practices for a solid freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your own schedule and managing clients.  Register now! 
     

    Morning Reading List, 01.23.08

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • You are calling it right now – The Patriots are going to win the Super Bowl.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Looks like lots of people are making this mistake.

  • The George Washington University’s School of Media and Public Affairs will host “Reporting from Iraq: the View from the Ground Up,” a forum on news reporting of the war featuring journalists who reported from the scene. It is this Thursday 8-10:30 p.m.

    Top of post

    TV

  • TV Decoder reports, “As previously noted, Fox appears best positioned to weather the writers’ strike. ABC, on the other hand, may be hurt by it the most. Why? ‘Because it has the biggest scripted hits — and because its audience, heavily female, is most susceptible to being stolen away by ‘American Idol,” Bill Carter reported in Saturday’s Times.”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “In the latest fallout from the writers strike, CBS has trimmed its development slate, letting go of about 20 projects, most of them dramas.”

  • Fortune reports, “Headlines about Oprah Winfrey last week focused, quite rightly, on the icon’s plans to start her own cable television channel. But there’s another story to be told about Winfrey’s partner in the venture, Discovery Communications, and how its relatively new CEO is on a mission to remake the company.”

  • Variety reports, “Media and entertainment stocks have been sluggish for months, but things could well take a turn for the worse today. Bearish signs were everywhere Monday despite U.S. markets being closed for the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Major plunges in markets in Europe and Asia suggested a boomerang hit Stateside today. Stock index futures pointed to a grim start to the week, possibly a loss of 400 points or more for the Dow. One mark being watched closely is 20%. With a particularly rough session, the market could register a 20% pullback from its peak in October, which would statistically qualify this as a bear market. The current bull market began in 2002.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Poynter Online’s Steve Klein reports, “Since I first looked at the new White House blog, Trip Notes From The Middle East (which debuted on Jan. 8 with a couple posts by White House Press Secretary Dana Perino), there have been eight more posts by Ed Gillespie, Counsellor to the President; Stephen Hadley, Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs; Bill McGurn, Assistant to the President for Speechwriting; Joshua Bolten, White House Chief of Staff; and on Jan. 16, none other than George W. Bush — well, you know who he is!”

  • UPI reports, “The New York Times agreed Monday to offer it’s online Web content to AT&T wireless customers at no extra charge to subscribers. According to Nielsen Online, NYTimes.com registered 17.2 million unique visitors in December 2007, helping secure its place as one of the country’s leading newspapers. Based in San Antonio, AT&T, similarly, is the country’s largest wireless company, bizjournals.com reported.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Yahoo! Inc., owner of the most- visited U.S. Web site, will cut about 700 jobs, or 5 percent of its workforce, as it reorganizes to compete with Google Inc., according to a person with knowledge of the plans.”

  • The Washington Note reports, “Facebook is no longer a college kid rolodex. It’s becoming part of emerging new media in the country — a distribution network for causes as well as news and opinion.”

  • Regarding this, The New York Post reports, “That three staffers — a writer, a photographer and an editor, former lobbyist Megan Carpentier — have been fired at Wonkette since Ken Layne took over the political Web site in DC. ‘He’s putting in place his own team,’ said owner Nick Denton.” And from Eat The Press: “Another Gawker Media Staff Shake-Up: Wonkette Editor Fired”

  • A tipster points us to this, the District Taxi Fare Estimator. “The estimator will help you determine if your cab fare in the District will cost more or less under the time and distance meters, which are scheduled to replace zones in April. You may choose one of our sample routes, or try your own by entering starting and destination addresses, or by dragging the green and red map markers. Remember, these are estimates. Actual fares will vary, depending upon how much time is spent stopped or slowed in congested traffic.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • A release announced, “At noon, Friday, Jan. 25, 2008, WAMU 88.5′s weekly look at local politics will change names and broaden focus. Newly renamed, The Politics Hour with Kojo and Jonetta now will include comprehensive coverage and analysis of both local and state politics in Maryland and Virginia, in addition to the news and newsmakers in District politics. The monthly ‘Virginia Politics Hour’ and ‘Maryland Politics Hour’ episodes of The Kojo Nnamdi Show will be incorporated into the newly revamped Politics Hour, giving listeners a weekly source for the latest news from the Washington, D.C., suburbs and the statehouses in Annapolis and Richmond.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America is looking for a Director of Public Affairs.

  • Campaigns & Elections’ Politics magazine is looking for an Editorial Assistant.

  • Northern Virginia Daily is looking for a bureau chief.

  • NewsUSA is seeking a Manager Editor.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.15.08

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington. It’s the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Wikipedia. (See King’s Wikipedia entry here.)

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think Hillary Clinton was “edgy” on “Meet”

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • The Washington Business Journal reports, “Gannett Co. Inc. has named the chief executive of online ad company PointRoll Inc. to be its new chief digital officer, as it seeks to expand its online operations. Chris Saridakis, who was named PointRoll chief executive after McLean-based Gannett acquired the company two years ago, will oversee digital operations at Gannett’s newspapers and television stations. He will report directly to Gannett chief executive Craig Dubow.”

  • J. Peter Freire is the new Managing Editor of The American Spectator. Freire first came to the Spectator as an intern and editorial assistant under a journalism fellowship from the Intercollegiate Studies Institute.

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The real Dowd scandal

  • Washington Post’s Deb Howell writes, “Here’s what happened in New Hampshire: Reporters lost their natural skepticism and took what they thought was happening and projected it far past the facts. The experts were wrong, the polling a disaster. The Post, luckily, didn’t poll late in New Hampshire and wasn’t among those making a bad call.”

  • The Virginian-Pilot’s Joyce Hoffman writes, “Coming on board as public editor with the news that Landmark Communications, and with it The Virginian-Pilot, is likely to be sold is a daunting endeavor. An end to the century-old tradition of leadership by a family with a historic commitment to public service journalism is a troubling prospect for Hampton Roads.”

  • Richard Just writes, “What happened at the Supreme Court 20 years ago tomorrow has been long forgotten by most Americans — if they ever heard about it at all. Unlike the better-known decisions of the last century, the ruling handed down on Jan. 13, 1988, had nothing to do with race or abortion rights. It didn’t become fodder for presidential candidates and hasn’t galvanized voters on either the left or right. Yet over the past two decades, the court’s ruling in Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier, which concerned high school newspapers, has had far-reaching consequences. Not only has it changed the way journalism is taught at many schools, it has made it more difficult for high school students to learn the important lessons about democracy that come from publishing — or simply reading — serious newspapers.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • A release announced, “MSNBC presents special live coverage
    … of the Michigan primary, as well as the Democratic presidential debate live from Nevada. Coverage begins with ‘Hardball with
    Chris Matthews’ live from Las Vegas at 5 and 7 p.m. ET, ‘Tucker’ live at 6 p.m. ET and ‘Countdown with Keith Olbermann’ at 8 p.m. ET.”

  • A CNN release announced the network “will dedicate the 8 p.m. hour each weekday to the latest election news coverage from the campaign trail in a new program, CNN Election Center. Building on CNN’s successes and ratings wins from both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primaries, CNN Election Center will be anchored by members of the ‘Best Political Team on Television’ from the New York-based CNN Election Center and on the trail by CNN anchor John Roberts.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Broadcasting & Cable published an editorial today that served as a call to the networks to focus more energy on presidential news coverage. It also applauded ABC News for its debate coverage, which rated extremely well, and its New Hampshire special, which didn’t, but was the only network that gave the primary a half-hour.”

  • The Washington Times reports, “A legal battle over advertisements for a new documentary about Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton illustrates the folly of current campaign-finance laws, says the attorney for the producers of the film, which premieres tonight in Washington. ‘Hillary: The Movie’ is ‘a political documentary like Michael Moore or Al Gore has made,’ said James Bopp, who went to federal court last week to represent the movie’s producers. Yet the conservative group Citizens United, which produced the Clinton film, must ‘go to court to get permission to advertise the film… because of McCain-Feingold,’ he said.”

  • His Extreme-ness reports, “If you saw John Kerry on ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ Sunday morning, you saw him talking about his endorsement of Barack Obama. And you probably also saw him successfully pull off a tough stunt — banning something he didn’t want from the show.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Rep. Ron Paul took part in last Thursday’s GOP debate on Fox News after being excluded in the New Hampshire forum. His supporters were, well, less than happy with Fox News over the decision to leave out Paul from the N.H. forum, as Frank Luntz explained.”

  • TVNewser reports that MSNBC announced in a press release how it plans to handle hosting a debate and covering the Michigan primary tonight. The debate will take place at 9 p.m.
  • PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler writes, “The press, the pundits and the polls all got a big black eye this week after forecasting, with considerable certainty, a big victory for Sen. Barack Obama in the Democratic primary in New Hampshire. Much has already been written and broadcast about this episode. Newspapers and television networks have had stories about how everybody got it wrong and what the various reasons may have been. I don’t have much to add to this other than to wonder if individual news organizations — aside from their obvious, next-day follow-up stories — took some time to conduct their own in-house post-mortems to figure out if this glaring error in polling and news judgment should alter in some fundamental way the manner in which they approach political coverage. It’s not as though it hasn’t happened before.”

  • This Wednesday at Nathan’s Q&A cafe will feature Amy Holmes, described as “a three-fer: female, black and republican. There’s not much we won’t be able to politically slice and dice.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Hotline’s On Call is covering the Michigan primary live tonight.

  • Poynter’s Steve Klein reports, “No one has been more supportive of bloggers and more critical of mainstream media than Ted Leonsis, the former AOL executive who owns the NHL Washington Capitals. (OK, well maybe Mark Cuban is close.) Leonsis has paid to send independent bloggers to cover Caps prospects in Russia, and when long-time Washington Times hockey writer Dave Fay died late last year, no one was kinder. So when Leonsis shelled out $124 million over 13 years last week to keep his franchise player, Alex Ovechkin, in town — it was the biggest contract in Washington D.C. sports history — Leonsis had a right to expect some accurate coverage in the MSM and some honest passion from the bloggers. But to read the owner’s very active blog, Ted’s Take, it doesn’t appear he got a great deal of either.”

  • Christopher Hitchens Watch reports that Hitchens has quit smoking. No, really.

  • Be sure to c heck out Breitbart TV. Ed Driscoll reports, “About a minute into the latest B-Cast by Liz Stephans and Scott Baker of Breitbart.TV (whom we interviewed a few weeks ago on PJM Political), they casually mention that their previous show attracted about 400,000 views.”

  • Marc Fisher reports, “Living in a city without a full-time jazz station, I have to rely on CDs and downloads to hear my fill of Miles Davis and John Coltrane. But to discover new jazz from singer Madeleine Peyroux or pianist Bruce Barth, it’s necessary to reach past broadcast radio to online music services, music blogs and pay satellite radio. But now comes NPR Music, a sprawling Web site from National Public Radio on which I can listen to the NPR jazz (or classical or folk or indie rock) shows that don’t air on Washington’s public stations — as well as tap into song lists, video and audio of concerts, music-related stories from NPR’s news shows and a raft of programs from public stations across the country.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • Wonkette reports, “Campaigns & Elections magazine was one of those old insider trade magazines for people that simply couldn’t get enough of campaign tactics and other campaigners in the off-season — but there’s nary an off-season anymore. So, C&E redesigned the magazine (it’s shiny!), started writing about politics and threw a swanky party with an open bar in a big black room to celebrate.” For pics, click here.

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Former CBS Public Eye editor Matthew Felling is hosting “The Kojo Nnamdi Show” today at noon on WAMU 88.5, talking Macs and Movies.

  • The Redskins’ Tumultuous Season Didn’t Gain Yardage on Sports Radio

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • CommunicationWorks is looking for a Media Manager.

  • mediabistro.com is looking for mediabistro.com Instructors.

  • Widmeyer Communications is looking for an Account Manager and a Senior Associate/Assistant Vice President.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Technology Writer.

  • WTOP Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • WFED Radio is looking for a Reporter.

  • AARP is looking for a Managing Editor — AARP Bulletin.

  • SourceMedia is looking for a Reporter, The Bond Buyer/Washington Bureau.

  • Strauss Radio Strategies, Inc. is seeking PR Pros Specializing in Broadcast.

  • Youth Today is looking for a Publisher and a Managing Editor.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 12.20.07

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington. On this day in 2002, Sen. Trent Lott resigned as Senate Majority Leader.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • You think card games are “much fun.”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • A reader wonders, “Where did the Washington Times Christmas tree go? It was there but now it’s gone”

  • NPF president Bob Meyers writes, “Last year you supported us with many contributions so we could meet our Challenge Grant obligations. This year the challenge is equally important, but we’re doing this on our own, without any challenge grant to spur us on. … Could you help with a $25 contribution? A $50 contribution? We’re a 501-c-3, so you could deduct your gift. I’ve added a connection to our magical online giving icon (you can find it on our site as well).” For more info, click here.

  • FCC Eases Ownership Limits for Big Media

  • Politico has a caucus night bingo game for readers (no, it is not a drinking game, although we find that hard to believe).

  • New York Times Sees Boost from Web Sites

  • Tribune CEO Expected to Step Down in Buyout

  • From a Post insider: “what frustrates so many post reporters about today’s nytimes piece on the bacon fiasco is that, yet again, downie does not explain how editors edited the story and does not address the criticisms of the piece. instead, he takes the easy way out and defends the notion that young people can be big reporters too. he’s permitting daly to divert the discussion away from the real journalistic issue. he should have come out and explained what was wrong with the story, what was right with the story, and what the post will do to ensure it doesn’t happen again.”

  • PEJ reports, “Americans received a grim picture of the war in Iraq in the first 10 months of 2007. Daily violence accounted for 47% of the stories studied. And of the stories that offered an assessment of the direction of the war, most were pessimistic, according to a new study of press coverage from Iraq from January to October.”

  • Newsday, Hoy to Pay $15 Million in Circ Case

  • Also from Pew, “Man-made and natural disasters dominated the list of the public’s top news stories in 2007. Nearly half of Americans (45%) tracked news about the shootings at Virginia Tech University very closely, while nearly as many paid very close attention to reports on the Minneapolis bridge collapse and the California wildfires.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “After weeks of bad news, Hillary Clinton and her strategists hoped that winning the endorsement of Iowa’s largest newspaper last weekend might produce a modest bump in their media coverage. But on Sunday morning, they awoke to upbeat headlines about their chief Democratic rival: ‘Obama Showing New Confidence With Iowa Sprint,’ said the New York Times. ‘Obama Is Hitting His Stride in Iowa,’ said the Los Angeles Times. And on Monday, Clinton aides were so upset about a contentious ‘Today’ show interview that one complained to the show’s producer. Clinton’s senior advisers have grown convinced that the media deck is stacked against them, that their candidate is drawing far harsher scrutiny than Barack Obama. And at least some journalists agree.”

  • Washington Post reports, Don Graham, “The chairman of The Washington Post Co., who separated from his wife last month, just closed on a 1896 semi-detached townhouse near Dupont Circle. The four-bedroom, four-bath Tudor underwent extensive work during the past year and is described as impeccable.” Ed Note: Wait, Post ombudsman Deb Howell says that Don Graham’s divorce isn’t appropriate for the Style section (it went in Business) but his house sales are?

  • CJR reports, “In an otherwise reasonable and spirited defense of a reporter, The Washington Post’s Leonard Downie Jr. trips by employing ad hominem attack and innuendo against a critic—the very tactics Downie seeks to criticize.”

  • Washington Post reports, “Capitol Steps founder Bill Strauss was a Harvard-trained lawyer and Senate subcommittee staffer when he broke through the chrysalis of Capitol Hill conventionality to become a musical satirist. Mr. Strauss, who died Dec. 18 of pancreatic cancer at his home in McLean, recalled the breakthrough in a phone interview shortly before his death at age 60.”

  • Politico reports, “New York Times columnist Frank Rich regularly chides political journalists for not thinking outside the Beltway in covering the presidential campaign. But what about venturing beyond the west side of Manhattan? Unlike his Times opinion-writing colleagues — Maureen Dowd, David Brooks and Gail Collins — Rich has yet to rack up an Iowa dateline this year, not to mention New Hampshire or South Carolina.”

  • The New York Times reports, “Inside the pressure-cooker that is live television, the name Barack Obama apparently becomes tricky.
    The Democratic presidential candidate’s name has been confused with the terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and even Omaha, Neb., in separate occasions on CNN recently.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • “2007 Ratings: MSNBC has ‘Fastest Growing Primetime Lineup of any Top-50 Cable Channel,’” reports TVNewser.

  • TVNewser reports, “Bob Schieffer: 2008 Campaign Probably ‘My Last In The Role I Have Now’”

  • TVNewser reports, “You may have noticed World News with Charles Gibson and World News Now have been broadcasting form a different location this week. We are hearing construction is underway for a new set which is expected to debut in the next couple of weeks. We’re told the new set will also be HD-ready and that the Gibson broadcast is expected to be in HD sometime in 2008.”

  • The New York Observer reports, “CNN’s Jonathan Klein on Campbell Brown, Couch Potatoes and Plans for 2008″

  • Wonkette reports, “Joe Scarbrough and Friend Ridicule Huckabee’s Jesusery”

  • TVNewser reports, “Gore Vidal Has Beef With Wolf Blitzer, Apparently”

  • TVNewser reports, “The cable nets continue breaking news coverage of a fire at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, which is part of the White House complex. Of the three cable news nets, CNN was first with the news at 9:42:30. MSNBC was next at 9:43:10 and FNC reported the story at 9:44:40.” Meanwhile, on broadcast, “ABC News’ Chris Cuomo anchored a network special at 9:51amET on the fire at the EEOB. The NBC network continued with the third hour of the today show and aired a special report at 10amET (MSNBC was already in breaking news coverage of the fire). CBS reported the fire with an update to the west coast feed of The Early Show at 10amET”

  • TVNewser reports, “In an opinion column in USA Today, titled ‘Does Al-Jazeera belong in the USA?’, Souhelia Al-Jadda, an associate producer at Link TV’s Mosaic: World News from the Middle East and a member of USA Today’s board of contributors, laments the fact that more than one year after the launch of Al-Jazeera English, ‘no major U.S. cable or satellite company is willing to carry the station.’”

  • Inside Cable News reported yesterday, “Bloomberg TV announced this morning that Terry Holt and Stephanie Cutter will be providing analysis for the Iowa Caucus and New Hampshire primary.”

  • A CNN release announced, “The next stops for the CNN Election Express include Iowa for the state’s upcoming caucuses, New Hampshire for the nation’s first primary elections and visits to Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Los Angeles for CNN’s remaining presidential primary debates. To date, the CNN Election Express has served as the studio for interviews with top presidential candidates including Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.), former Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.), former Gov. Mike Huckabee (R-Ark.) and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). The studio configuration includes a lighting grid with full power to allow quick set-up for interviews. The video equipment on board can also be used outside for interviews and live shots.”

  • TVNewser reports, “The NewsHour Gets New Set, Goes HDTV”

  • TVNewser reports, “It was good news all around for CNN yesterday, with a re-up for CNN/U.S. President Jon Klein and a memo from CNN Worldwide president Jim Walton discussing all the “fun” the network is having.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Once again, Obama has been confused with Osama. This time, by HLN’s Glenn Beck on Good Morning America.”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Comcast Says FCC Limit Rule Is ‘Perverse’

  • FCC Accepts Google’s Auction Application

  • Check out www.2008ElectionProCon.org, “created to be a comprehensive source of information on the 2008 presidential election.” The site has “compiled the pro and con positions of all the presidential candidates on major policy issues, along with other resources related to the election, like a printable one-page summary of all the candidates’ positions on the issues and a history of political parties. All of the information is designed to help people determine for themselves which candidate would make the best president.”

  • A reader writes in, “Have you seen www.Whitehouse.com lately? (not .gov, BTW). Yes it is the same URL that was once the famed porn site. Now it has been reborn as some kind of uber-hip political blog. And word on the street is they’ve been phoning up reporters and inviting them to come and start work…resume, clips and references sight unseen. The site boasts 10 years of tradition (doesn’t mention that 9.5 of them are as a porn site)…and check out the ‘benefits’ page! 25 cent soft drinks and occasional Pizza Fridays!”

  • Poynter Online’s Steve Klein writes, “How can I say this nicely? Oh, what the heck. If Ted Leonsis is going to be candid and bash mainstream media, then why can’t I? It’s not like I need a job. At this point in my career, I’d only be bought out at best or downsized in a restructuring at worst.”

  • A release announced, “Alive in Baghdad, a web news program reported and filmed by local Iraqis and distributed by independent US news agency Small World News lost correspondent Ali Shafeya Al-Moussawi after he was killed over the weekend in Sadr City. The correspondent was found dead by a family member after being shot 31 times. Details as to motive and circumstances about the killing are undetermined.”

  • Check out the “major design” of Bloggingheads.tv.

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • A Democracy release announced, “It’s not chestnuts roasting on an open fire or ringing sleigh bells, but Christmas came early (or Hannukah came late) to Democracy this December. Just after we had released our winter issue and thought things would be winding down for the year, we were notified that Democracy has been named the Best New Publication of 2007 by the Utne Independent Press Awards.” For more on the awards, click here.

  • Check out a new video feature on newyorker.com, The Naked Campaign, “a series of short videos featuring the illustrator Steve Brodner as he draws the Presidential candidates and discusses the race for the White House. The videos are directed by Gail Levin, with animation by Asterisk.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Carl Kasell — the National Public radio newscaster and the judge/scorekeeper/second banana on NPR’s weekly call-in quiz show ‘Wait, Wait … Don’t Tell Me!’ — is running late for an interview. … Mr. Kasell, who’ll be moonlighting next week as the announcer for the 30th annual “Kennedy Center Honors” broadcast, was recording an answering machine message for a ‘Wait, Wait’ winner. Such is the highly coveted prize for callers who triumph in events like ‘Listener Limerick Challenge,’ ‘Bluff the Listener,’ and ‘Who’s Carl This Time?’ — wherein Mr. Kasell delivers highly flavored imitations of newsmakers from Paris to Britney to George W. and all points and poobahs in between.”

    Top of post

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Amos Snead is stepping down as Press Secretary to House Republican Whip Roy Blunt and is returning to FD Dittus.

  • Salon finally admits that Michael Scherer is leaving. Joan Walsh writes, “Some of you may have noticed the change to Michael Scherer’s bio at the bottom of his great Meghan McCain profile today, identifying him as our ‘former’ Washington correspondent. I’m sad to say that Michael has left us to cover the presidential campaign for Time magazine. He’s been a crucial part of our news resurgence over the last two years, breaking stories on Abu Ghraib, George Allen’s race problems and the 2008 presidential campaign. We miss him already. But we’re thrilled to welcome Mike Madden, who has covered politics, Congress and Washington for Gannett News Service since 2000. Mike has also written for Time.com, the New York Observer, USA Today and Wonkette, and he’ll join Walter Shapiro on the campaign trail shortly.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Society for HR Management is looking for an Associate Editor.

  • NewsUSA is seeking a Feature Writer.

  • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is looking for a Washington Bureau Reporter.

  • PBS is looking for a Director, PBS Engage.

  • Heldref Publications is looking for a Marketing and Advertising Director.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.29.07

    4345057.jpg
    Good morning Washington.

  • Fine, fine … we’re sucking it up and joining Facebook.

  • Your folks are Democrats, well, mostly.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • “Four years into the war, Iraq correspondents would give their reporting mixed, but generally positive reviews and think they have covered the U.S. military more effectively than they have covered the citizenry of Iraq,” a Pew release announced.

  • Harry Jaffe writes, “How to Poke Don Graham and Not Get Fired for It (Hint: Try Facebook)”

  • One Mediabistro reader wants to know, “Does the Washington Post really drug test?”

  • This morning check out “a special video series entitled, ‘A Nation Divided,’ illustrating the Iraq war’s influence on the presidential campaign by award-winning producer Travis Fox” on washingtonpost.com. “The three-part series focuses on populations in three primary states: Iowa, South Carolina and New Hampshire.”

  • The AP reports, “A Banc of America analyst downgraded shares of the New York Times Co. Wednesday, saying Wall Street expects unrealistically strong spending from luxury and national advertisers.”

  • Reuters reports, “Nearly 90 percent of U.S. journalists in Iraq say much of Baghdad is still too dangerous to visit, despite a recent drop in violence attributed to the build-up of U.S. forces, a poll released on Wednesday said.”

  • E&P reports, “Nearly two-thirds of Americans do not trust press coverage of the 2008 presidential campaign, according to a new Harvard University survey, which also revealed four out of five people believe coverage focuses too much on the trivial — and more than 60% believe coverage is politically biased.”

  • CJR reports, “Just when you thought it was safe to spread open The New York Times and eat a turkey and cranberry sandwich, Mark Halperin turns in a Week in Review op-ed that kills the appetite. He’s decided that the national press spends too much pushing horse race manure, while ignoring leadership and character, which he says can be found in the oats of candidates’ ‘full lives and public record.’ Points for originality!”

  • AJR reports, “As U.S. news organizations have backed away from foreign news coverage, the Associated Press’ international report has become increasingly vital.”

  • The New York Observer reports,Bill Keller announced moments ago in a memo that there will be layoffs at The New York Times. He wrote that it will not affect reporters, but a hiring freeze will be strictly enforced.”

    RADIO

  • USA Today reports, “Friendly satellite radio rivals Sirius (SIRI) and XM (XMSR) enter the final month of 2007 with reasons to be wary. They have to worry whether the softening economy will hurt new car sales — the largest generator of new satellite radio subscribers.”

    TELEVISION

  • Another Disclosure Debacle for CNN

  • DNC Cancels Democratic Debate; Was To Be Moderated by Katie Couric

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of November 19-27, 2007. The NBC broadcast posted its best total viewer delivery since February 12, 2007 and its best advantage since December 18, 2006.”

  • Eric Boehlert writes, “Last Friday marked something of a milestone for ABC’s widely acclaimed news program Nightline when it aired a detailed look at life inside the chaotic emergency room at the 28th Combat Support Hospital in Baghdad. The significance? It was the first time since July 18 that Nightline had broadcast a firsthand news report from Iraq examining the on-the-ground effects of the still-unfolding war there.”

  • Media Week reports, “More than 18 months after The New York Times pulled out of its joint cable venture with Discovery Communications, the Discovery Times Channel is shedding its outdated moniker.”

  • TVNewser tells us that Fox News has pimped their “Election Newsgathering Vehicle.”

  • Think Progress pointed out yesterday, “Coal Industry Sponsoring Tonight’s CNN/YouTube Republican Presidential Debate”

  • Presidential Debate Canceled Amid CBS Strike Plans

  • TVNewser reports, “November marked 14 months in a row that Countdown with Keith Olbermann has topped CNN’s 8pmET program in the A25-54 demo; and the 12th month in a row in the total viewer category.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN says Headline News continues to have ‘its best year on record.’”

  • Bill Hemmer On The Difference Between FNC And CNN

  • The Examiner reports, “The news of the untimely death of Redskins star Sean Taylor traveled quickly Tuesday morning. CNN was the first to break the news around 5am Tuesday but soon after that local outlets WTOP, WMAL, NBC4, FOX5, ABC7 and CBS9 all were reporting the sad news of death of Taylor as the lead news story.”

  • Washington Post reports, “The Federal Communications Commissions voted for a set of watered-down cable regulations late last night, as increasing tensions among the agency’s five members allowed the industry to largely avoid tough rules.”

  • St. Petersburg Times takes a “Peek inside CNN’s inner sanctum”

  • Marty Kaplan writes, “CNN spokeswoman Christa Robinson wrote HuffPo’s media relations vp saying that my post about how the CNN/YouTube Republican Debate was rigged was ‘pretty infuriating.’”

  • Check out Green Room Girl’s newest pics here.

    BOOKS

  • Huffington Post reports, “Writing on Editor and Publisher this morning, Public Affairs Books founder and editor-at-large Peter Osnos addresses the media frenzy that’s greeted the announcement of Scott McClellan’s forthcoming volume, What Happened. In summation, Osnos is seemingly shocked–shocked!–that the marketing strategy his company pursued with regard to McClellan’s book has actually worked in the manner that was intended.”

    MAGAZINES

  • Mixed Media asks, “What is Peter Carlson’s beef with Details?”

  • Karen Tumulty shares what it is like to write for a newsweekly.

  • Niche Media announced, “With a Holiday 2007 launch, Niche Media will debut Trump Magazine, the quintessential guide to luxury living and the entrepreneurial spirit. Trump Magazine will be published quarterly with a distribution of over 100,000 copies that will be hand-delivered to Trump properties, residences, and golf courses and sold in select cities across the country.”

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • A release announced, “Sen. John McCain will be the third presidential candidate, and first Republican, to participate in the groundbreaking MySpace/MTV Presidential Dialogue series. The interactive Dialogue will take place at Southern New Hampshire University in Manchester, NH with an in-person audience of university students, and for the first time, be simultaneously broadcast live on MTV, MySpace (www.myspace.com/election2008), MTV’s www.ChooseOrLose.com, cross-carriers on MTV Mobile, and translated live into Spanish via ImpreMedia’s LaVibra. Today www.myspace.com/election2008 and www.ChooseOrLose.com will begin accepting user-submitted video questions (30 seconds or less) on the issues that matter most to young voters in the upcoming elections. Submissions will be accepted through Sunday, December 2, and the video with the highest ratings and community response on Monday will be posed to Sen. McCain during the evening Dialogue.”

  • Poynter Online’s Steve Klein writes on the coverage of Sean Taylor’s death, “It is, however, to point out that when it came down to keeping up with the story, the best and timeliest source of information was La Canfora’s blog.”

    JOBS

  • Federal News Radio AM 1050 is looking for a Web Writer.

  • American Association for Justice is seeking Legal Content Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Taking Out The Trash, 02.12.07

  • The AP reports that Myrtle Sue Snyder Barnes, “a pioneering Virginia journalist and former managing editor of the Daily Press of Newport News and its defunct afternoon edition, died Thursday. She was 73.” (Hat Tip: E&P)

  • Think Progress complied a coverage comparison following the death of Anna Nicole Smith. It discovered that on the day of her death, “NBC’s Nightly News devoted 14 seconds to Iraq compared to 3 minutes and 13 seconds to Anna Nicole. CNN referenced Anna Nicole 522% more frequently than it did Iraq. MSNBC was even worse — 708% more references to Anna Nicole than Iraq.”

  • GMU professor Steve Klein calls the Washington Post’s OnBeing, “a great example of what multimedia journalism is all about.”

  • New hire at The Washington Times metro desk: Kristen Chick.

  • Also, Danny Selnick has joined Business Wire as vice president, public policy services.

  • From a Fox News tipster: “We’re going to miss Megyn! She is, as you said, a “hot one” but she was also very sweet, and a good journalist! loss for the D.C. Bureau :(