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Posts Tagged ‘Timothy Noah’

POLITICO Pro Announces 7 New Hires

PoliticoProThe same day that it saw three of its reporters jump ship for CNN Politics Digital, POLITICO announced several POLITICO Pro hires.

In an email to staff Wednesday evening, POLITICO Pro editor Marty Kady wrote that Timothy Noah has been named labor policy editor, to launch the Pro Labor and Employment vertical this fall. He most recently wrote for MSNBC. Law360′s Brian Mahoney will join Noah on labor team.

Additional hires include Elana Schor - most recently with Environment & Energy News – will cover the oil and gas industry for Pro, The Hill’s Kate Tummarello will join the Pro tech team, and Bloomberg BNA’s Heather Caygle recently joined Pro to write Morning Transportation.

On the production end, Emily Kopp joined ProWeb as a web producer on Sept. 2. Cogan Schneier, a TFAS alum and recent USA Today intern, joined this week as a web producer.

With the launch of Pro Labor and Employment this fall, Politico Pro, the subscription service offered by the Arlington-based political pub, will operate 14 topical verticals.

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TPM’s Benjy Sarlin to MSNBC’s ‘Hardball’

This just in from Talking Points Memo political reporter Benjy Sarlin

“As of June 3, I am now reporting for MSNBC and Hardball, based out of NBC’s Washington bureau. My new work e-mail is [BLANK] and you can reach me at the office by phone at [BLANK]. Please update your records and apologies for the mass e-mail!”

Politico previously reported the memo on new MSNBC hires. And on Monday, the New York Observer reported additional hires, including reporters Irin Carmon, Timothy Noah and a new social media editor, Nisha Chittal. Carmon is from Salon, Noah hails from TNR and Chittal was at the Travel Channel.

TNR Announces Myriad of New Hires

TNR is adding to and changing its roster.

Timothy Noah: A new TNR senior editor. Noah (at right) worked for TNR in the 80s as an intern and then a staff writer. He’ll write a blog and a column. He replaces Jonathan Chait who moved on to NY Magazine.

Alec MacGillis: Hired from WaPo. MacGillis (at left) will cover the 2012 election.

Eliza Gray: Promoted to staff writer.

Walter Shapiro: Special correspondent. Shapiro (at right) formerly worked for the now defunct Politics Daily.

Cameron Abadi: Hired from Foreign Policy Magazine. He’ll be a deputy editor and will oversee a web redesign.

See the internal memo…

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On and Off Record. What Does it Really Mean?

In traditional journalism circles, “off the record” means that a journalist cannot use the quote even anonymously. Granted, people don’t often know what they mean when they employ the phrase. Sometimes they just want assurance that they won’t be quoted. Once negotiated, “on background” typically means you can use without attribution. But in a recent story by Slate‘s Dave Weigel, he sways on and off the record in a surprising manner. Surprising in that he uses “off the record” quotes that are supposed to be off the record. Are there different rules in Greenville, SC?

A look at his lede:

GREENVILLE, SC — On the record, the local Republican party is trying to make this matter. The governor is trying to make this matter. The media, with a collective shrug and a protest from the AP’s photo pool, is arguing otherwise. Off the record, the local GOP sort of agrees.

Then he goes on to quote his “off record” source: “Of all the guys here Tim Pawlenty is the only one who speaks my language,” one activist told me. “What language is that?” I asked. “Being able to win?*”

“Yes,” he said. “That.”

Read the full story here.

Want to know more? Read this fascinating piece on the varying meanings of on background, deep background, not for attribution and off the record in this 1999 Slate piece by Timothy Noah. Makes us want to conduct Noah’s experiment again and see if things have changed.

Slate Awarded 2011 Hillman Prize

Which of these is not like the others? Slate‘s most read stories bar features two stories from yesterday, two from Wednesday, and one from…September of last year?

It’s no glitch. The 10-part series on income inequality from September, by Timothy Noah, won the 2011 Hillman Prize in the Magazine category this week. The Prize, named for New Deal architect Sidney Hillman, is awarded annually for work that demonstrates a “sense of social responsibility” and “highlights important social and economic issues.”

In a special note featured at the top of the story, Slate says they’re “delighted that the Hillman Foundation has recognized Noah’s work.”

Hillman prizes were also awarded in the Newspaper category to Brad Heath and Kevin McCoy of USA Today, Najibullah Quaraishi of Frontline/WGBH in the Broadcast category, and Dallas Morning NewsMona Reeder for Photojournalism.

Read Noah’s series here, and find out more about the Hillman Prize and its winners here.

Side note: Doesn’t the Hillman Foundation logo look familiar?

Morning Reading List, 12.22.08

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Good morning, Washington. Which Washingtonians feature the above framed message in their bathroom?’ Think you know? Email us with your best guess. AND: Join us after the jump to find out if you guessed our last contest correctly.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 08.15.08

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Good morning Washington.

Got a blind item, interesting link, funny note, comment, birthday, anniversary or anything of the sort for Morning Reading List? Drop us a line or let us know in the tips box below.

We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

Read more

Morning Reading List, 02.15.08

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You think MSNBC has some serious issues with sexism and obnoxious statements.

  • And, it is close, but more than half of you are in loooove.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The Pew Weekly News Interest Index shows, “Barack Obama is seen by most Democrats as inspiring and as most likely to bring about change. Hillary Clinton is widely viewed as prepared to lead the country, but also hard to like.”

  • Rochester Paper, WashingtonPost.com Reach Most Adults

  • Regarding this, a reader writes in, “shouldn’t it embarrass the Post newsroom downtown just a little bit that it’s been 10 years and they’re still having the same freak-bouts about .com as they were when it started? Seriously. wp.com ain’t the one with dropping circulation numbers, people — get on board or get off. Short-sighted and silly.” And, another reader says, “Maybe the Posties at 15th and L ought to spend their time figuring out how to beat the competition, rather than eating themselves alive from within — and whining at every turn about how they just don’t understand what’s happening to the news business.”

  • Gannett, NYT, Tribune, Hearst in online ad sales venture

  • Dallas Morning News Managing Editor George Rodrigue writes, “Several readers wrote to ask why we ran a photo of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton at the top of Wednesday’s front page, after Sen. Barack Obama had just won primaries in Maryland, Virginia and Washington, D.C. ‘If I just looked at a glance I would have bet the farm that Hillary Clinton had won all the marbles in Tuesday’s primaries,’ said Yvonne Crum of Dallas. ‘Obama wins eight states in a row, yet Hillary gets the front page spread. Fair and balanced? I don’t think so, and I am not even a Democrat,’ said Joe Womack of Dallas. On the photo, we simply made the wrong call. The headline (‘Obama wins three more’) and the photo were out of synch. We should have run the photo of Mr. Obama, which was down-page, in the lead position occupied by the image of Mrs. Clinton. But the fact that our layout desk featured Mr. Obama’s victories in the headline should answer any worries about deliberate bias.”

  • A release announced, “The New York Daily News is preparing to write a new colorful chapter in its rich history with the announcement of its purchase of state-of-the-art, high-volume full-color press equipment. By the end of 2009, the Daily News will become the first major market daily newspaper in the United States to be produced in 100% color on new press equipment manufactured by KBA, a global leader in printing technology. The new Commander CTÃ’ presses will give the Daily News the ability to efficiently produce all copies of all editions in color, reinforcing its future as the country’s leading tabloid and enabling its millions of readers to enjoy the city’s first full-color newspaper.”

  • Forbes.com asks, “Do newspapers still need The Associated Press? And does The Associated Press still need newspapers? Until recently, these would have been ridiculous questions. But print circulation is tumbling. So is advertising revenue. Editors are slashing budgets and making do with less. Readers are moving online, where they get all the national and international news, sports scores and celebrity gossip they can read–for free, updated constantly, and often by AP.”

  • WWD.com reports, “Media observers already are noticing the changes in a Rupert Murdoch-owned Wall Street Journal — a British editor for the glossy magazine launch, talk of a sports section, a move to Midtown. Now word around the Journal newsroom is that a prototype is being developed for a culture section, possibly to run weekly. The project is in the very early development stages, and a spokesman for The Journal declined comment Tuesday.”

  • His Extreme-ness writes, “The U.S. Department of Journalism under assault — from another branch of government!”

  • Wall Street Journal’s The Numbers Guy reports, “Election Handicappers Are Using Risky Tool: Mixed Poll Averages”

  • Radar’s Full Court Press writes “The estimable Warren P. Strobel of McClatchy Newspapers, who has a fine record of questioning all of the Bush administration’s lies on the way to the war in Iraq. But this time he seems to have been a bit sloppy. Strobel wrote that Weekly Standard editor and New York Times columnist Bill Kristol is part of ‘McCain’s foreign-policy team.’ But Strobel didn’t bother to confirm this with Kristol. When Times editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal asked Kristol about it, he flatly denied it.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the most-watched Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, February 10, 2008 in all categories. On Sunday, the Russert-moderated program was No. 1, averaging 4.497 million total viewers”

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for the week of February 4, 2008, ABC News’ ‘Nightline’ continues to close the gaps with CBS’ ‘Letterman’ and NBC’s ‘Leno’ among Total Viewers and Adults 25-54. The program posted 3.6 million total viewers and 1.75 million Adult 25-54 viewers, its best performance since the week of December 3, 2007. Among Adults 25-54, both CBS’s and NBC’s leads over ‘Nightline’ have declined for the 5th consecutive week.”

  • TVNewser asks, “Did ‘Blurred Lines’ Lead to Shuster Suspension?”

  • The Horses Mouth reports, “MSNBC Spokesperson: Shuster Will Not Be Fired And Will Return To Network”.

  • TVNewser reports,Hillary Clinton Confirmed for MSNBC Debate”

  • “Legendary broadcast journalist Daniel Schorr will speak about and sign his book, Come to Think of It at a luncheon program co-sponsored by the English-Speaking Union on Tuesday, February 19 at the Woman’s National Democratic Club. … The cost of the program is $30. For tickets, contact the English-Speaking Union at esuwdc.net/(202) 234-4602, or the Woman’s National Democratic Club at (202) 232-7363.

  • Chris Matthews blasts Clinton press office

  • “TVNewser obtained an email that American Morning EP Edward Litvak sent last night to the A.M. staff: ‘Chez Pazienza has left ‘American Morning’ and CNN. We wish him well in all of his future endeavors.’ A CNN insider tells TVNewser Pazienza was let go because, “he did not get permission to publish personal writings. Those personal writings come from The Huffington Post, where Pazienza has been blogging since January 23. His most recent post, on February 10, took on the controversy surrounding MSNBC correspondent David Shuster.”

  • Brand Republic reports, “News International is considering taking The Sunday Times compact, as part of a planned series of major changes to the title.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comcast Corp., the biggest U.S. cable-television provider, may have to buy back more stock or pay a dividend to satisfy investors after a 35 percent drop in the shares last year.”

  • The New York Observer asks, “MSNBC’s David Shuster: Defender of Clinton Family Honor?”

  • TVNewser asks, “What Could Tucker Possibly Be Referring To?” Check out the video here.

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Mediabistro.com asks, “So What Do You Do, Paul Steiger, Editor-in-Chief, ProPublica?”

  • Inside Cable News says goodbye. “I can’t keep ICN going in its current form anymore. If you’d noticed it’s been slipping a bit this week as I floundered to try and ‘do it all’. That was a wake up call. Time to call it a day. Time to reclaim those five hours a day of of my life that are devoted to doing something I like but which I can’t make a living off of. And then there’s my real job which pays me more than I could probably make blogging.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “Yes, MSNBC consistently has the lowest ratings among the cable news channels. But all is not lost. It does stand out in one underappreciated category: embarrassing, mealy-mouthed apologies.”

  • AlwaysOn reports, “We all know VCs and startups have to be bullish about 2008, despite a rocky economy, but when a top analyst says digital media M&A will be up, even after an explosive 2007, it’s worth another look.”

  • The Boston Globe reports, “Veteran journalist Philip S. Balboni, who built New England Cable News into the nation’s largest regional news network, is leaving the station next month to start the first US-based website devoted exclusively to international news. The site is expected to launch early next year with correspondents in nearly 70 countries. The company, Global News Enterprises LLC, will have its headquarters on the historic Boston waterfront at the Pilot House on Lewis Wharf.”

  • Reuters reports, “Time Warner Inc’s Internet division AOL and IAC/InterActiveCorp’s Citysearch site will announce on Thursday a partnership to share local content and advertising resources. Under the deal, Citysearch will provide its local business reviews, videos from merchants and promotions for AOL Web sites such as AOL CityGuide, AOL Local Search and MapQuest.”

  • Tech Crunch reports, “At the start of the Microsoft/Yahoo saga we reported that News Corp. was scrambling to put together a bid to compete with Microsoft, but backed down because they were unable to find outside funding to make the deal lucrative enough (the sorry state of the debt markets contributed to the problem). Yesterday Silicon Alley Insider reported that talks between the two were continuing. We’ve confirmed the rumor — Yahoo and News Corp. are in the middle of marathon discussions, and have more details.”

  • “CNN’s iReport.com Makes Its Debut”

  • Kim McLarin writes about “Surviving on a blackness-only diet.”

  • Slate’s Timothy Noah explores Michelle Obama’s Reuters Halo!”

  • Huffington Post’s Eat The Press reports, “In yesterday’s review of MSNBC’s primary night coverage, Alessandra Stanley made one huge, glaring error that proved to anyone even casually watching the coverage that she had no credibility on the matter, at all. The error was this: Attributing the slogan ‘the best political team on television’ to MSNBC and not CNN, where that slogan is shoehorned into pretty much every segment, debate, pre-commercial sign-off and available chyron. It is a constant refrain, one which I find I can’t read without hearing Wolf Blitzer’s voice awkwardly intoning it in my head.”

  • Private Equity Hub reports, “Tributes.com, a new spinout from Eons, has raised $4.3 million in funding from Dow Jones, Eons and other strategic backers. VentureWire reports a post-money valuation of $8.9 million. Tributes.com is an online content company focused on obituaries and related information, which means it will compete with sites like Legacy.com. Eons is a social network for the baby boomer set, and has raised $32 million in VC funding to date.”

  • Folio reports, “Time Editor: Someday There Will Be People Who Don’t Know There’s a Print Version”

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    MAGAZINES

  • Folio reports, “Traffic to Magazine Web Sites Grows 8.1 Percent in Fourth Quarter”

  • FishbowlNY reports, “Vanity Fair’s JFK Love Child Goes Public”

  • On Tuesday, Ronald Brownstein, the Political Director of Atlantic Media, will discuss his latest book at The Aspen Institute from 12:00-2:00 pm.

  • New York Post reports, “BUSINESSWEEK, the McGraw-Hill flagship magazine that was rattled by pre-Christmas layoffs in the editorial department, has pushed another 20 people with contracts closer to the door. Last Friday, Executive Editor John Byrne on a conference call told the contract workers they were being reassigned to a contract with Kelly Services.”

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    RADIO

  • The AP reports, “The Justice Department on Wednesday approved the $19.5 billion sale of Clear Channel Communications Inc., the largest U.S. operator of radio stations and the world’s largest billboard company.”

  • Also from The AP, “The owner of a radio station that promoted a rock concert where pyrotechnics ignited a deadly blaze reached a tentative $22 million settlement with survivors and victims’ relatives, according to court papers filed Wednesday. The deal with Clear Channel Broadcasting is the latest in a series of settlements stemming from the Feb. 20, 2003, fire at The Station nightclub in West Warwick that killed 100 people and injured more than twice that many.”

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    JOBS

  • Home Front Communications is looking for a Web Producer.

  • Jane’s is looking for a Maritime Reporter.

  • Voice of America is looking for a News Division /writer.
  • National Public Radio is looking for a Senior Editor (Copy), News & Information.

  • National Geographic is looking for a Specialist, Int’l Children’s Magazines.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for an Advertising Sales Manager.

  • FOX News Channel is looking for a Producer.

  • American Society of Landscape Architects is looking for a Director, Public Relations and Communications.

  • Greenpeace is looking for a Senior Video Producer.

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Editorial Assistant.

  • Retirement Living Live show is seeking a Creative Producer.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.27.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington

  • The hometown team is favored to win it all.

  • FishbowlDC has learned that Ben Giliberti is no longer a wine writer at the Washington Post.

  • A reader comments, regarding this, “There is also a major standoff between ABC and WGAE, which covers productions types in the Washington bureau.”

  • ThinkProgress documents what they call “A Bad Week For The Politico

  • Comedian Sheryl Underwood gets a daily talk show on XM

  • Check out the winners of the 2006 VPA News, Editorial & Photo Contest.

  • AirCongress has launched a new feature called the Monster Media MashUp. It will “keep tabs on the latest policy- and politics-related audio and video produced by outlets like Bloomberg, C-SPAN, the major television networks and more, and pull them together in recurring entries like this one.”

  • Slate’s Timothy Noah notes that, “Robert Novak remains bizarrely in denial about whether he unmasked a covert employee of the Central Intelligence Agency.”

  • A reader notes, “Breaking news can’t wait around for spell check. I guess CNN beating them today took a toll. Breaking News from ABCNEWS.com: ‘CORONER: ANNA NICOLE HAD NINE PERSCRIPTION DRUGS IN HER SYSTEM AND AN INFECTION IN HER BUTTOCKS CONTRIBUTED TO HER DEATH.’”

  • TVNewser tells us how President Bush interrupted Chris Matthews’ schmoozing.

  • Frank Ahrens reports, “The Washington Post Co. has nominated Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger to the company’s board of directors to replace longtime director George W. Wilson, who will retire at the May 10 board meeting.”

  • Ahrens also reports that TMZ is “the fastest-growing Internet news site.”

  • Arlington based buySAFE.com is popping up everywhere, from the Today Show, to Newsweek and the Wall Street Journal.

  • The Extreme-ness looks back at Life magazine.

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “As the 2008 presidential campaign gets rolling, Google is forming a political sales team. Political campaigns are expected to shift more of their advertising dollars to the Web.”

  • Reuters reports, “A little under one-third of U.S. households have no Internet access, with most of the holdouts seeing little use for it in their lives, says a survey by Park Associates, a Dallas-based market research firm.”

  • USAToday’s Peter Johnson writes, “Media experts say that the way ‘Hillary 1984′ video clip made its way into the national discussion serves as a cautionary tale for traditional news outlets, which risk spreading material that may be damaging or untrue to wider audiences — all for the sake of staying current with the Web.”

  • According to the Hollywood Reporter, “ABC.com and NBC.com are trading blows in the race for top broadcast portal.”

  • The New York Times reports, “U.S. newspaper companies are reporting steep declines in advertising revenue for February, as classifieds continue to shift from print to online.”

  • WWD.com reports that Conde Nast’s Portfolio.com “is adding three bloggers: Lauren Goldstein Crowe, who helped launch Time Style & Design, will blog about fashion; Felix Salmon will blog on finance, and Tim Swanson, formerly of Premiere, will have an entertainment news blog.”

  • DCRTV has a rant.

  • Jeff Patch loves to spotattorneys general on the weekend.

  • DCRTV reports that Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Deputy Western Finance Director Anne Brady “joins the DC-based National Association Of Broadcasters as VP of the trade organization’s political action committee. Previously, Brady served as director for the Capitol Hill Heart Health Campaign.”

  • Kit Seelye reports, “For newspapers, February was the cruelest month. So far. Revenue from advertising was in striking decline last month, compared with February a year ago, and were generally weaker than analysts had expected.”

  • “The Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk, The News & Advance of Lynchburg and the Northern Virginia Daily of Strasburg have been honored as the best daily newspapers in Virginia.”

  • Taking Out The Trash, 03.02.07

  • Leading today’s caption contest so far is “Wait… I keep getting this wrong – so first you mix in the polonium, then the sugar?”

  • From Pew’s Weekly News Interest Index: “Iraq remained the top news story last week, both in terms of public interest and news coverage. Anna Nicole Smith’s death and the bizarre aftermath continued to attract a distinct yet devoted audience. In spite of the fact that most Americans think Smith’s death has been over-covered, the core audience for the story gives the press high marks for its coverage. Other top stories of the week included the 2008 presidential campaign, mounting tensions between the U.S. and Iran, conditions at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and the rescue of three climbers from Oregon’s Mt. Hood.”

  • An ABC release announced that “World News with Charles Gibson” won the February sweeps among viewers and adults 25-54. This is the first across the board sweeps win for ABC since 1996.

  • Voice of America is hiring an executive editor.

  • After getting in their digs at the Washingtonian by saying “Washingtonian joins the 21st century,” DCist gives a plug for alumna Catherine Andrews and the new Washingtonian blogs, calling them “largely interesting reading.”

  • A reader writes in saying that “This tipster is just whining: Go take a survey of how many women are WH correspondents. CNN had an all female WH team (still might), ABC’s lead and #2 are women (Raddatz and Yellin), and then there’s Norah O’Donnell and the incoming head of the White House Correspondents Association is a woman (Ann Compton, ABC Radio). That’s just off the top of my head. I’m sure there are lots of others.”

  • Do leap years have a special meaning for reporters?

  • Washington Business Journal reports, “AOL has found a new CFO, snatching an executive from parent company Time Warner.” Nisha Kumar, vice president of operations at New York-based Time Warner, will serve as the CFO at Dulles-based AOL.

  • C-SPAN2′s Book TV is airing on Saturday Arthur Schlesinger, Jr’s last television interview conducted with Book TV last week in New York City. The show will air at 8:25 a.m. and 9 p.m.

  • Dan Gerstein thinks it ain’t no thing that he “used The Politico as a platform partly to settle the old scores of — and to advance the current agenda of — a paying client, but without mentioning the ‘paying’ part.”

  • A huge discussion taking place in the comments section of Arianna Huffington’s post, “Limbaugh, Hannity, and the Right’s Faux Fury Over Anonymous Comments.”

  • Newsweek’s Richard Wolffe and Holly Bailey look into the “senior administration official,” concluding that while “Most reporters would prefer never to quote a White House official on background. But that means never getting anything out of most White House officials.”

  • Slate’s Timothy Noah rescued himself from Wikipedia obscurity.

  • Hugh Hewitt points to the Politico as more than a paper, but as a substitute for other paper’s D.C. bureaus.

  • CJR Daily gives James Taranto “a history lesson on of digital death threats.”

  • E&P reports that Salon’s Mark Benjamin says he beat the Washington Post to the punch on the Walter Reed story. “Reportedly, he has sent Priest links to his articles — which covered a wide range of issues at Walter Reed — and also contacted Post media critic Howard Kurtz.”

  • Eric Boehlert on TNR’s new owner.