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Posts Tagged ‘William Powers’

Morning Reading List, 04.01.08

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Good morning Washington. It’s Justice Alito’s bday, finally someone explains MoDo, Leon Harris likes baseball, The Deadline Club is out with its awards finalists, WRC’s Vickie Burns is heading to WNBC in New York, it’s the birthday of Redhead Fan Club favorite Jess Smith and don’t forget to not fall for April Fools jokes today.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • Hillary vs. McCain…you think McCain will win.

  • Today’s “Angry Journalist” rant of the day: “I’m angry because one of the finest, most talented journalists I’ve ever had the privilege to work with was forced to leave the paper last week. This senseless maneuver was attributed to flattening the management structure. I guess it’s OK to flatten structures, but when people get crushed in the process, that’s not OK”

    NEWSPAPERS

  • E&P reports, “The newspaper industry has experienced the worst drop in advertising revenue in more than 50 years. According to new data released by the Newspaper Association of America, total print advertising revenue in 2007 plunged 9.4% to $42 billion compared to 2006 — the most severe percent decline since the association started measuring advertising expenditures in 1950.”

  • Reuter’s Media File reports, “Former San Francisco Chronicle Editor Phil Bronstein has taken on a new role at parent company Hearst Corp. that will involve, among other things, finding ways to keep the news business viable at a time when most people have classified it as a dying industry.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. newspapers suffered their worst drop in print advertising sales since industry record- keeping began 57 years ago, hammered by the housing-market slump and competition from the Internet.”

  • Reliable Source reports, “For Washington VIPs, there were two hot tickets in town last night — not just an Opening Day seat at the new Nationals Park, but a coveted spot at the Lerner family’s pre-party, a little casual-dress affair for 800 of their closest friends. Folks like Michael Chertoff, Norah O’Donnell, Maury Povich and Connie Chung, MLB Commissioner Bud Selig and Japanese Ambassador Ryozo Kato. Pretty much any boldface name not preoccupied with a presidential campaign or the NCAA regional finals showed up at the team owners’ shindig on the top floor of a new office building two blocks from the stadium.”

  • Howard Kurtz writes, “Wall St. Journal Makes Politics Its Business”

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    TV

  • Politics benefits CNN.”

  • Rendell: ‘Fox Has Done the Fairest Job’

  • Kornheiser and Jaworski return to ESPN Monday Night Football

  • TVNewser reports, “CNN just announced that Wolf Blitzer’s day just got longer. Blitzer anchors a special Sunday night edition of The Situation Room at 8pmET ‘focusing on the presidential race’, said Blitzer during Late Edition. An interesting programming move considering this is the final day of March ratings and CNN holds a slim 1,000 viewer advantage over MSNBC in prime time (Mon-Sun, 8p-11p) in the key A25-54 demo.”

  • Media Post’s On Media reports, “Obsessing over Time Warner’s fate and fortune is a time-honored pursuit that usually ends with the same discouraging realization. Even after adding AOL, subtracting cable, tweaking filmed entertainment and contemplating an overall breakup, the $50 billion behemoth is a product of reactionary rather than visionary leadership-and is, at its core, a content company.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc., the world’s largest media company, must share control its Superman copyright with the heirs of the comic hero’s creator, Jerome Siegel, a federal judge ruled.”

  • TVNewser reports, “With April 16 marking his one-year anniversary as co-anchor of CNN’s American Morning, John Roberts is profiled by TV Guide. Asked by writer Stephen Battaglio about what he expects when AM gets a new executive producer, Roberts says, ‘We’ll take the opportunity to just tweak around the edges of the show. The show as it is right now is fairly heavily scripted. I think what we’re going to do going forward we’ll try to pare back the amount of scripting that we’ve got and introduce a little more of an ad lib aspect to it, which will make the show a little looser, a little more accessible…’”

  • A release announced, “CN8, The Comcast Network today announced its plans to provide extensive coverage of the critically-important April 22 Pennsylvania primary, offering comprehensive, interactive news and feature programming available on air, online and ON DEMAND throughout April. Unlike traditional networks which are sending teams to Pennsylvania, CN8 is already utilizing its more than 120 PA-based employees, its six studios across the state, and its dozens of hosts, contributors and political experts who cover Pennsylvania and presidential politics 365 days a year.”

  • TVWeek reports, “Media buyer ZenithOptimedia has lowered its forecast for U.S. advertising spending for 2008 as the effects of the housing crisis seep into the economy and consumer confidence droops. Zenith sees newspaper advertising taking a bigger hit while Internet spending grows even faster than previously expected. Overall, ad spending will rise 3.7% in 2008, said ZenithOptimedia, which in December had forecast a growth rate of 4.1%.”

  • TVNewser’s Gail Shister writes,Dave Marash, a recent exile of Al Jazeera English, says his new book ‘certainly won’t be a ‘kiss and tell,’ ‘cut and whine’ about his former employer. The ex-’Nightline’ correspondent confirms he’s close to a deal for ‘The World Really is Watching,’ (working title), an analysis of the planet-wide expansion of television news. He’s been mulling the topic for a while.”

  • TVNewser reports, “This Friday marks the 40th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., and networks are set to mark the occasion in a variety of ways. CNN’s Soledad O’Brien anchors the special ‘Eyewitness to Murder: The King Assassination’ at 9pmET on Thursday. The special is the first in CNN’s Black in America series.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Arianna Huffington’s Dick Wiki

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Not much is booming in the American economy these days, but there’s a bull market in blame. All over the media, people are pointing fingers at those who supposedly got us into this mess. Some say that Alan Greenspan did it. Others fault, variously, President Clinton, President Bush, Congress, and, of course, Wall Street. And let’s not forget the foolish people who took out all of those crazy mortgages in the first place. But there’s one culprit the media don’t mention much: themselves. This is a little strange because the news business has become quite good at publicly whipping itself for all kinds of sins. Many outlets employ columnists whose sole duty is to scold colleagues for their errors.”

  • PressThink reports, “The Love Affair Between McCain and the Press Sprains the Brain of the Liberal Blogosphere”

  • The New York Times reports, “When Ms. Huffington, the 57-year-old author and former conservative pundit, announced her plans for The Huffington Post three years ago, many critics dismissed the idea as a digital dinner party for her new liberal friends. But it has grown in ways that few, except perhaps Ms. Huffington herself, expected.”

  • Wolf Blitzer, George Will, and other big names at Lerners party at opening night for Nats stadium, writes Harry Jaffe.

  • AdAge.com reports, “Reinforcing print publishers’ frequent assertions of relationships with readers, new research by MediaVest suggests that readers trust print more than the web in almost every area.”

  • USA Today reports, “Looking to snare a larger share of Internet ad dollars, traditional media companies are launching ‘vertical ad networks’ in which they sell ad bundles of space on their sites and on independent sites with complementary content. Forbes.com’s Business and Finance Blog Network, announced last week, includes more than 450 finance-focused blogs, such as Talking Biz News and Xconomy. Forbes will sell ad space across that network, earning a cut of the revenue from the sites.”

  • BBC launches redesign of its news site

  • TechCrunch’s Erick Schonfeld writes, “Six Months In, And 600 Posts Later … The Worlds Of Blogging and Journalism Collide (In My Brain)”

  • New York Times reports, “When Ms. Huffington, the 57-year-old author and former conservative pundit, announced her plans for The Huffington Post three years ago, many critics dismissed the idea as a digital dinner party for her new liberal friends. But it has grown in ways that few, except perhaps Ms. Huffington herself, expected.”

  • Innovation in College Media reports, “Journalism school graduates: How to increase your chance of finding a job and decrease your chance of having to vent on AngryJournalist.com”

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    MAGAZINES

  • MediaWeek.com reports,John Micklethwait, editor of the highbrow British news and opinion weekly The Economist, knew his magazine had solidified its place in the American culture when The Simpsons’ beloved, hapless patriarch paid homage in an episode. But the magazine’s recent business successes on these shores are anything but a joke. It has achieved impressive gains in ad business and readership and scooped up industry accolades (most recently, a National Magazine Award nom for General Excellence), even as much larger news and business titles wither and as a certain high-profile launch — one promising ‘business intelligence’ on the front of every cover — doesn’t look so smart after all.”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Still on Ann S. Moore’s to-do list: trimming the portfolio of Time Inc. titles. That’s the impression she left with many staffers after a quarterly management meeting March 27. Ms. Moore, Time Inc.’s chairman-CEO, told top managers that she is still looking carefully at the portfolio of magazines so the company — the country’s biggest magazine publisher, with brands such as Time, Sports Illustrated and People — can focus on the titles best positioned for growth in print and online.”

  • Business Wire reports, “For the first time ever, global news and business bible The Economist shoots to the No.1 spot on AdweekMedia’s annual ‘Hot List.’ Released today, the highly anticipated ‘Hot List’ honors the publications and creative talents that keep consumers coming back to the newsstands. Leaping from its No. 10 rank last year, The Economist marks the biggest jump on the list and proves that news and business titles remain contenders in a market dominated by women’s lifestyle titles.”

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    JOBS

  • The Yomiuri Shimbun (Washington Bureau) is looking for a Reporter/Research Assistant.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 03.17.08

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    Happy St. Patrick’s Day Washington.

  • Sunday was Ellen McCarthy’s birthday. Today is Tim Burger’s and Mark Paustenbach’s and Saturday was Jenny 8 Lee’s.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | BOOKS | JOBS

  • Email is your favorite way to communicate.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Karen Hosler has left the Baltimore Sun.

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • A release announced, “The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel is the winner of the 2007 Thomas L. Stokes Award for Energy Writing. Reporters Thomas Content, Lee Bergquist and Joel Dresang will share a $1,000 check and receive individual citations for the yearlong project.”

  • Justice and the Press

  • The AP reported that The Washington Examiner’s Nate Beeler won a Virginia Press Association award “for a portfolio of three editorial cartoons.”

  • Clark Hoyt says the Times was fooled again.

  • Deb Howell on “A Reporting Coup and Its Critics.”

  • Celebrated History of the CIA Comes Under Belated Fire

  • With Order to Name Sources, Judge Is Casting a Wide Net

  • Are job cuts death knell for America’s newspapers?

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “When some people first heard the news about New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer and a prostitution ring, they thought: How awful, how tragic, how corrupt. When I first heard it, I thought: Thank God for newspapers.”

  • E&P reports, “A dispute over a Pulitzer Prize finalist in investigative reporting has emerged between The Denver Post and the Charlotte (N.C) Observer. The conflict sparked a phone call Wednesday from Observer Editor Rick Thames to Post Editor Greg Moore, who is also a Pulitzer Board member. Moore says he is now ‘writing a letter about it.’”

  • Walter Pincus Rips into Newsroom Neutrality

  • The Washington Post reports, “In his youth, Ivory Wilson says, he drove a Bentley, drank Hennessy and rolled joints with $100 bills. Now he’s a middle-aged man, bent but not broken, homeless but not hopeless, writing fiction for Street Sense, the District’s twice-monthly newspaper written by and about the area’s homeless.”

  • The Q&A Cafe will feature The Washington Post’s Len Downie on April 10.

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    TV

  • TVNewser reports, “You know a presidential primary is really important when…a news program that rarely goes on the road decides to pull up stakes and do just that. With Pennsylvania the focus of attention on April 22, PBS anchor Jim Lehrer will broadcast The NewsHour from Pittsburgh during the week of April 21.”

  • Bob Schieffer: Who says there isn’t life after TV?

  • Iraq war disappears as TV story

  • Rove on Fox: It’s Fair to Say He’s Mellowed

  • Business Week reports, “Ever since Brian L. Roberts abandoned a hostile bid for Walt Disney (DIS) four years ago, Wall Street has wondered when the Comcast (CMCSA) chief executive and serial acquirer might make a play for another big media prize. The chatter picked up last fall, just before America’s largest cable company confessed that it would add fewer subscribers than expected in the fourth quarter. Some investors worried that, with growth slowing, Roberts might try to pick off Yahoo! (YHOO) or NBC Universal (GE) — diversifying away from cable by wading into the murky waters of ‘content.’”

  • Information Week reports, “The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is defending the way it tracks complaints, investigations, and enforcement, and it claims a critical government report is based on several inaccuracies. The U.S. Government Accountability Office issued a 53-page report this week saying the FCC doesn’t properly collect and analyze data, making it impossible to analyze the effectiveness of its enforcement.”

  • Michael Calderone reports, “Fox launches ‘Obama Watch’”

  • TVNewser reports, “A tornado that tore through downtown Atlanta did not spare the CNN Center. This morning the network has been covering the aftermath of the severe weather, and the potential for more today. Anchor Betty Nguyen took viewers on a tour of part of the newsroom ‘where our writers and our producers sit.’ It is now covered with blue tarp. The tornado shattered windows in the newsroom and damaged the roof in the atrium which, until 2003, was the studio for the CNN daytime program, Talk Back Live.” And, “After last night’s tornado, CNN was taking no chances today. The blog Newscast Studio added, ‘Today CNN was thrown another curve ball…CNN’s Frederica Whitfield uses the CNN International set to bring the news to the viewers.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • The Project for Excellence will release the State of the News Media 2008 report today at www.stateofthenewsmedia.org.

  • Richard Prince writes, “A front-page photo of Sen. Barack Obama in the New York Times last week showed the Democratic front-runner on his campaign plane as a number of hands holding tape recorders reached up to him. None of the hands appeared to be black or brown. It seemed ironic in that Obama is the first African American with a serious chance to be president, running in a campaign in which the nuances of race have been discussed as never before.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Newspapers and online publishers appear to be heading back into battle against search engine behemoth Google.”

  • Politico.com has been redesigned.

  • Web Has Unexpected Effect on Journalism

  • Find out here what His Extreme-ness calls “Just Whore-ible”

  • strong>Laurel Touby Holds Fake Presser

  • The AP reports, “Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates said Thursday he expects the next decade to bring even greater technological leaps than the past 10 years.”

  • Is KickApps Next to Board AOL’s Gravy Train?”

  • A release announced, “OhMyGov!, the only website devoted to improving bureaucracy through the spread of information, ideas, innovative online tools, and strategic satire, today announced the launch of its pilot site, www.ohmygov.com, for beta testing.”

  • Conde Nast’s Portfolio asks, “Google’s business model of internet-search-driven advertising has become so dominant that competitors Microsoft and Yahoo can hardly compete. But will C.E.O. Eric Schmidt be able to keep Google true to its roots?”

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    MAGAZINES

  • It’s that time of year again. “Nominate yourself or a colleague for the 2008 Campaigns & Elections’ Politics magazine Rising Stars.” Entries should be submitted by April 18, 2008 and emailed to risingstars@campaignsandelections.com.

  • The New York Observer reports, “At Columbia, The Inadvertently Boldface Joanne Lipman Sticks to the Script”

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “Jon Meacham and his wife, Keith, are celebrating the arrival of No. 3 — Margaret Randolph Meacham, to be called Maggie. You’d never know her folks are from Tennessee and Mississippi. They’ll see you in 18 years.”

  • Also from Mike Allen, “Jay Carney and Claire Shipman opened their home to a celebration for TIME Nation Editor Amy Sullivan’s new book, ‘The Party Faithful: How and Why Democrats Are Closing the God Gap.’ TIME Managing Editor Richard Stengel was also a host. Guests included Mike McCurry, Walter and Cathy Isaacson, Sally Quinn, Dana Bash, Howard Kurtz, Sam Feist, Chris Matthews and David Bohrman. Among many others, Sullivan thanked her fiance, The New Republic’s Noam Scheiber.”

  • Market Watch’s Jon Friedman tells us about, “Three magazines that deserve better fates”

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    RADIO

  • Innovator rethinking Tribune ways

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “The future of Time Warner, MGM, Lionsgate, Liberty Media, satellite radio and the general outlook for mergers and acquisitions in the media and entertainment field were in the spotlight Thursday at McGraw-Hill’s 2008 Media Summit New York. ‘There is going to be a lot of M&A activity’ despite the recent credit crunch, said Santo Politi, co-founder and general partner of Spark Capital, during a panel on the industry’s deal outlook. His rationale: Media giants have become more active in pursuing digital companies as they embrace the digital future and private-equity firms’ ability to bid in deals is hurt by the crunch.”

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    BOOKS

  • Jennifer 8. Lee will be at Sixth & I Historic Synagogue at 600 I Street, NW tonight for a Politics & Prose event.

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    JOBS

  • The McLaughlin Group is looking for a Writer/ Producer.

  • Child Welfare League of America is looking for an Associate Editor/Writer.

  • Washington Business Journal is looking for a Web Reporter.

  • The Associated Press is looking for an APTN Newsperson.

  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • Need To Know News is looking for a Financial Reporter.

  • NSSEA is seeking an Entry-Level Editorial Assistant.

  • World Resources Institute is looking for a Communications Coordinator — GHG Protocol, World Resources Institute.

  • National Journal Group is looking for an Account Executive.

  • Dickstein Shapiro LLP is looking for a Website Administrator.

  • Food & Water Watch is looking for an Advocacy Writer.

  • The Map Network, a NAVTEQ Company, is looking for a Destination Account Manager.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Defense Reporter and an Energy Policy Reporter.

  • A New Web Channel is looking for a Capitol Hill Correspondent/Fill-in Anchor.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Senior Interactive Designer.

  • National Consumer Magazine is looking for an Associate Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 03.03.08

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    Good morning Washington. One year ago we said goodbye to Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. and AP said hello (again) to Ron Fournier. It’s the birthday of Alexander Graham Bell, Jessica Biel and, yes, me, which is the closest I’ll ever get to the lovely Biel. And to answer your questions: 1.) No, I don’t feel older, 2.) I was sick of my 20s anyway and 3.) A flat screen tv would be great, thanks.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | JOBS

  • You think Willie Geist is hotter than Joe Scarborough.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Washington Times reports, “It’s a bad day for those assigned to cover the Redskins on a daily basis — the team has parted ways with Chris Helein, the media relations chief since the summer of 2006.”

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    NEWSPAPERS

  • Killing Competition Breeds New-Style Foreign Correspondents

  • The latest survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press shows, Barack Obama is riding high as the March 4 primaries approach. Obama has moved out to a broad-based advantage over Hillary Clinton in the national Democratic primary contest and holds a 50%-43% lead over John McCain in a general election matchup.”

  • On the Press Bus, Some Questions Over Favoritism

  • Gannett Blog reports, “Batting three for three, The Arizona Republic appears to be protecting another top Gannett executive from embarrassing online reader comments. The paper published its story about newly appointed newspaper division President Robert Dickey (left) — without allowing comments at the story’s end. Dickey, 50, the Republic’ s chairman, replaces retiring Sue Clark-Johnson, 61 — another former Republic executive.”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “At the San Jose Mercury News, reporters have been instructed to wait at home on the morning of March 7. If they don’t get a phone call by 10 a.m. telling them that they’ve lost their jobs, they should head to work.”

  • The Crimson reports,Linda J. Greenhouse ’68, the New York Times reporter and former Crimson editor who has covered the U.S. Supreme Court for 30 praise-filled years, will retire from her beat, the newspaper confirmed yesterday.”

  • From a reader: “Here’s another one on everyone’s fave new media honco, Zell: If you look at the AP’s board of directors’ history, they hardly ever eliminate a Trib/NYT/WaPo member from their board, so Zell’s a shoo-in. If you were Ken Lowe/Gary Pruitt, would YOU piss off this man and vote ‘no?’ Me neither. When he visited the DC buros, I hear he had Randy Michaels, the up & coming CEO, in tow the whole time…”

  • Peggy Noonan on William Buckley.

  • The AP reports, “The Boston Globe says it plans to cut 60 jobs by offering voluntary employee buyouts. Publisher P. Steven Ainsley is telling staff that the buyout packages are a difficult but necessary step to lower costs and keep the business healthy. The plan is part of a broader cost-cutting effort.”

  • William F. Buckley’s Greatest Hits

  • The AP reports, “The New York Times Co. said Friday its January revenue from continuing operations dropped 5.5 percent, weighed down by a significant classified ad sales decline. The company, whose properties include The Boston Globe, International Herald Tribune and its namesake daily, said revenue from continuing operations slipped to $272.3 million from $288 million in the prior-year period.”

  • Newsday.com reports, “Newsday publisher Tim Knight Thursday announced that the newspaper will be cutting about 120 jobs throughout the company, citing declining sales and the ‘soft advertising revenue environment.’”

  • Bloomberg reports, “McClatchy Co., the newspaper publisher that paid $4.1 billion for Knight Ridder Inc. in 2006, wrote down the value of its publications for the second time in four months.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “Harbinger Capital Partners NY LLC and its affiliate Harbert Management Corp. on Friday filed a proxy with the Securities and Exchange Commission to elect four directors to New York Times Co.’s board at the 2008 annual meeting, scheduled for April 22″

  • Regarding The New York Times, Jay Rosen asks Romenesko readers, “What were the editors thinking?”

  • StuffWhitePeopleLike has The New York Times at #46. “Mornings are exceptionally important to white people, as witnessed by their love of breakfast places. However, some white people never go out for breakfast on a Sunday Morning. The reason? The Sunday edition of the New York Times.”

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    TV

  • A NBC release announced, “‘The Chris Matthews Show’ was the number-two rated Sunday morning public affairs show tying CBS’s ‘Face the Nation,’ and topping ABC’s ‘This Week’ and ‘FOX News Sunday’ in households nationally for the week ending February 24, 2008.”

  • The Washingtonian asks “Who’s Really The Best Political Team in Television?”

  • And NBC announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the top rated Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, February 24, 2008 in all categories.”

  • Griffin Compliments Countdown Demo Win

  • C-SPAN 2 & C-SPAN Radio will air the election results at 7:30 p.m., pending the Senate schedule.

  • A CNN release announced, “On the heels of CNN’s ratings win for the month of February and the network’s nine presidential primary debates, seven of which were among the most-watched in cable news history, CNN’s political team will report live from the CNN Election Center and across the country for the Tuesday, March 4 primaries. Voters in Texas, Ohio, Vermont and Rhode Island will cast their ballots and CNN journalists and analysts will be on-hand to report the results and what it means for the remaining presidential candidates.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Fox & Friends saw double digit gains year-to-year. The 7-9amET morning show is up 22% in Total Viewers, averaging 953,000 viewers this month. CNN’s American Morning is up 13% from last year, and is averaging 469,000 viewers.”

  • Poynter Online reports,Terry Gross, the Peabody Award-winning host of the NPR talk show Fresh Air, is a guest voice — as herself — on The Simpsons airing Sunday, March 2 on FOX. Actor Topher Grace also makes a guest voice appearance in the episode.”

  • TVNewser reported that Megyn Kelly got married this weekend. Sorry guys.

  • The Washington Post reports, “The recently resolved Hollywood writers’ strike took its toll on local ratings during the February sweeps period that ended Wednesday. Prime-time ratings declined last month compared with the same period in 2007 for nearly all Washington stations, which because of the strike aired more reruns and reality programming. The dip in prime-time viewership in turn affected ratings for some of the station’s late-night and early-morning newscasts.”

  • TVNewser reports,Liz Cox Barrett writes in the Columbia Journalism Review about an exchange on Morning Joe Wednesday morning with Pat Buchanan and Joe Scarborough. Buchanan and Scarborough were discussing Sen. Hillary Clinton and the difference between her speech pattern and that of Sen. Barack Obama.”

  • Power Line reports, “The Times Goes Looking for Media Bias … Not, as you might expect, in the mirror. Instead, the Times pointed its finger at a television station in the Republican South. This is a spin-off from the recent 60 Minutes story that apparently claimed it was Karl Rove’s fault that former Alabama Governor Don Siegelman was convicted of bribery and mail fraud. I haven’t followed that story closely, assuming that it is another 60 Minutes hoax.”

  • Jeff Greenfield: Sunday Nights Live

  • Media Money reports, “Time Warner’s new CEO Jeff Bewkes just showed Wall Street that he means business about cost cutting and getting the company on track. He just made his first big move: consolidating Time Warner’s New Line studio into its separate and larger Warner Bros.”

  • FreePress.net reports, “We just caught Comcast Corp. stacking an FCC hearing with paid (and apparently sleepy) seat-fillers. The hearing was set up to investigate Comcast’s recent blocking of the Internet. But Comcast packed the room so that the public couldn’t get in to voice their support for Net Neutrality.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CBS’ Bob Schieffer is this year’s recipient of the Leonard Zeidenberg First Amendment Award. It will be presented to him by PBS’ Jim Lehrer at the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation’s First Amendment Awards Dinner next week in Washington, D.C. CNN’s John Roberts will emcee the March 6 event. Other award presenters are to include ABC News President David Westin and NBC Universal CEO Jeff Zucker.”

  • TVNewser has a round-up of the ratings and reviews from MSNBC’s Tuesday’s Democratic debate.

  • Washingtonian presents, David Simon Chats About The Wire’s Final Weeks”

  • His Extreme-ness says, “If you base fictional politicians on real-life politicians, are you allowed to flip-flop on the issues — just like the real guys do? Apparently so if you’re David Simon, creator of the mega HBO hit ‘The Wire.’”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • It was Karl Frisch’s 30th birthday on Saturday.

  • A release announced, “New America Foundation’s Next Social Contract Initiative and Pollster Cliff Zukin released new findings on how public opinion shapes national values and informs the potential for policy reform, particularly in the areas of health care, education, taxes and economic security.” Check out the report entitled “The American Public and the Next Social Contract: Public Opinion and Political Culture in 2007″ here.

  • FaithfulAmerica.org, now operated by Faith in Public Life, sent a letter individually signed by 9,000 people of faith to the polling directors at the media organizations that sponsor the presidential primary exit polls. The letter asks ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox and the AP to stop stereotyping people of faith by asking all voters — Republicans and Democrats — the same religion questions on the exit poll surveys. We expressed particular concern that Republican voters in every state have been asked if they are evangelical, while Democrats have not been asked if they are evangelical in a single state. Signatures are still streaming in at FaithfulAmerica.org.”

  • MarketWatch reports, “In the convoluted saga of Microsoft Corp. bidding to gobble up Yahoo Inc., speculation about News Corp. emerging as the white knight to rescue the beleaguered Internet giant refuses to die.”

  • Post I.T. writes,Craig Newmark seems pretty content with his business, the hugely successful craigslist.org. He hasn’t accepted any outside funding, has declined offers to buy the site, and he doesn’t have any big plans to change its formats or features. So why was Newmark one of the keynote speakers this morning at the Southeast Venture Capital Conference in Tysons Corner? ‘I’m a curiosity,’ he said, sounding somewhat baffled by the attention he’s gotten since launching the site in 1995. The product hasn’t changed much. He still lists free classified ads from all over the world, charging only for job listings in 11 major markets and for apartment listings in New York City.”

  • NMA reports, “Hearst Digital Network, the online division of the National Magazine Company, is to close a host of its magazine websites. The move is part of a rationalisation of the network’s key brands that will see it reduce its focus from 13 titles down to five. The four magazine sites being closed include Good Housekeeping and Country Living, which will be wrapped into a single portal, Allaboutyou.com.”

  • Portfolio reports, “TechCrunch is the talk of Silicon Valley. Now the founder of the blog talks about the battle between Microsoft and Yahoo, Barry Diller, and why he says Gawker Media’s Nick Denton is ‘amoral.’”

  • ClickZ reports, “Yahoo has started testing behavioral and geo-targeting across its growing network of newspaper publisher sites. A preview of its nascent display ad management platform and recent statements from Yahoo execs indicate the firm’s sales restructuring, newspaper consortium project and network ambitions are aligning.”

  • Reuters reports, “Nearly 70 percent of Americans believe traditional journalism is out of touch, and nearly half are turning to the Internet to get their news, according to a new survey.”

  • A release announced, “DCist.com is pleased to announce its second annual DCist Exposed Photography Show, in partnership with Civilian Art Projects, running March 7-15, 2008. 44 local photographers, both amateur and professional, were chosen out of over 250 who submitted their work for the show through the DCist Flickr site. Every day DCist.com selects photos from a user-generated Flickr photo pool to use in its daily coverage of local news, arts and entertainment, politics, food and sports.”

  • Eric Boehlert writes, “The press will torment Obama, too”

  • Huffington Post’s Rachel Sklar talks to George Carlin and finds out he “Reads More Blogs Than You Do”

  • Wonkette reports, “Important New York Times editorial decisions
    New Republic Investigates NY Times Newsroom Politics Over Single Article, Again”

  • “Two thirds of Americans — 67% — believe traditional journalism is out of touch with what Americans want from their news, a new We Media/Zogby Interactive poll shows.

  • Mark Glaser writes, “Distinction Between Bloggers, Journalists Blurring More Than Ever”

  • The Telegraph reports, “Ten years ago, he was a reclusive, pasty-faced 31-year-old who, bashing away on his laptop in his grungy Hollywood apartment, shot to prominence when he threatened to bring down Bill Clinton’s presidency by breaking news of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Now, Matt Drudge owns a luxurious Mediterranean-style stucco house on Rivo Alto Island in Florida’s Biscayne Bay, a condominium at the Four Seasons in Miami and is said to drive a black Mustang. He remains an elusive, mysterious figure but the internet pioneer is arguably the single most powerful journalist — though his detractors even deny that is his occupation — in the world.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Some say that the media have fallen hard for Barack Obama. Others note that journalists once carried a torch for John McCain and may well do so again. Watch the coverage closely, however, and it turns out that the most powerful media bias in this campaign is not for a person but for a decade.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • The Nation’s Richard Kim writes, “I won’t attempt a grand summary of the late William F. Buckley’s legacy. The man was undeniably one of the great political forces of the 20th century — so too were Ronald Reagan and Milton Friedman. But in seeking to capture the scope of his influence, writers on the left have taken to applauding Buckley’s ‘brilliance.’”

  • On Buckley, Slate’s Timothy Noah writes, “Why we should be (mostly) glad that he outlived his brand of conservatism.”

  • Slate’s Michael KinsleyOn Intellectual Honesty Bill Buckley had it, journalism should strive for it, and politics needs more of it.”

  • Yale Daily News reports, “William F. Buckley Jr. ’50, whose penchant for the pen beginning in his earliest years at Yale popularized the conservative movement and transformed a generation of American politics, died Wednesday at his home in Stamford, Conn. He was 82.”

  • DMNews.com reports, “In an effort to heighten brand awareness of its online and print magazine titles, Hearst Magazines Digital Media will participate in Yahoo Buzz. Yahoo Buzz allows readers to vote on the popularity of online stories. Yahoo then posts the winners on its homepage. Hearst has signed on ten of its titles, including Esquire, Cosmopolitan and Redbook, as Buzz content partners.”

  • The Progressive announced that they have added two new columnists: “Dave Zirin, who delves into the politics of sports, and Jim Hightower, the great—and funny—Texas populist.”

    Top of post

    RADIO

  • A NPR release announced, “NPR News journalists Larry Abramson and Marisa Penaloza have been honored by the Education Writers Association with its ‘National Award for Education Reporting’ in the radio category for a year-long NPR on-air and online series following a Baltimore-area high school’s efforts to improve student achievement.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “Conservative talker Laura Ingraham gave her a big break, and now former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright wants her own radio show. ‘I think it would be so much fun,’ she tells us. ‘I love talking, listening, and asking and responding to questions.’ Albright was recently on Ingraham’s show talking up Sen. Hillary Clinton when she felt the urge to have the mike to herself. ‘I like to be provocative and like to be provoked,’ she says. ‘Having been on many radio shows, I know they provide great opportunities to learn about many different subjects and allow you to have fun while doing it—all without having to put on makeup!’”

  • Radio Ink reports, “XM Satellite Radio CEO Nate Davis this morning detailed some cost-saving changes his company is making to its marketing strategy, and also revealed how he’s working with Apple to make XM programming more accessible to iPod users.”

  • Reuters reports, “XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc and Sirius Satellite Radio Inc have extended by two months a deadline to potentially terminate without penalty Sirius’s year-old proposed acquisition of its bigger rival.”

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • Army Times Publishing Company is seeking Deputy News Editor for Navy Times and Navytimes.com.

  • Eurasia Group is seeking an Editor.

  • Liberty University is looking for a Promotional Copywriter.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for an Assistant Documents Editor.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for an Editor.

  • MarketWatch is looking for a Financial Regulation & Housing Reporter.

  • The Humane Society of the United States is seeking an Associate Editor.

  • Carroll County Times is looking for a Features reporter.

  • Citigate Cunningham is looking for a Director of Technology Public Relations and an Account Manager for Technology Public Relations.

  • National Federation of Independent Business is looking for a Web Communications Manager.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 01.14.08

    4345057.jpg

    Good morning Washington.

    On this day in 1952, the “Today” show premiered, in 1973 the Dolphins became the only one of only two NFL teams to go undefeated during the regular season, and in 2004, President Bush announced we’re going to Mars. (Hat tip: MicCheckRadio).

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:
    REVOLVING DOOR | NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | JOBS

  • You think Bono is both great and sorta annoying.

    REVOLVING DOOR

  • Mike Allen’s Playbook reports, “Jim Pinkerton quit his Newsday column and resigned his Fox News contract to join Gov. Huckabee as a senior adviser to help fill out his policy proposals. Pinkerton tells Playbook he was lured by Ed Rollins, his boss in the Reagan White House political-affairs office, who said it was a chance to ‘restore the Reagan coalition,’ Pinkerton recalled. ‘I thought, ‘I’m not going to turn THAT down,’ Pinkerton recalled.”

  • Howell Raines joins Portfolio.

  • Sharon Waxman announced she is not returning to the New York Times.

  • Voxant, the new media network announced the appointment of Marcien Jenckes, formerly Senior Vice President of Messaging, Community and Voice at AOL, as its new CEO.

  • Chris Bodenner has joined The Hotline.

    Top of post

    NEWSPAPERS

  • The National Press Foundation is hosting a free, half-day seminar on Thursday to help journalists make sense of the federal budget. Reservations are required by Wednesday. For more info, click here.

  • AP: Covering Britney Spears is a big deal, people.

  • PFAW reports that the Virginian-Pilot has reported that Pat Robinson is interested in purchasing the Norfolk based newspaper.

  • Fox Business reports, “The New York Times Company’s stock on Wednesday hit a price it hasn’t seen in almost two decades. Shares of the company known for its namesake flagship newspaper hit a low of $15.12 yesterday, a price the stock has not seen since 1988. The stock recovered slightly on Thursday, however.”

  • Business Week’s Jon Fine writes, “You’ve Got Tribune. Now Do Something — How new owner Sam Zell can breathe life into newspapers amid widespread malaise”

  • Reuters spoke with Gannett’s newspaper division chief Sue Clark-Johnson about her departure from the company. Check out the interview here.

  • The LA Times wonders if Mike Allen ever sleeps.

  • “The National Press Foundation welcomed three journalists to its Board in 2007, including Jim Brady of washingtonpost.com, Amy Walter of the National Journal’s The Hotline, and Wendy Wilkinson of NBC News.” For the full release, click here.

  • The Hill reports, “Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) is criticizing NBC for disinviting him from an upcoming Nevada presidential debate, and says he is considering legal action. NBC had invited the long-shot candidate on Jan. 9 but rescinded its decision Friday morning, when NBC Political Director Chuck Todd informed the Kucinich camp that the network was ‘redoing’ its participation criteria, according to the campaign”

  • Entries for the Thomas L. Stokes Award for Best Energy Writing are due on January 31. For more info, click here.

  • The Chronicle for Higher Education announced, “The Chronicle has joined with Gallup in a new partnership. The first venture of the Chronicle/Gallup Poll Alliance is designed to help colleges use polling to learn more about how they are perceived by the public.”

    Top of post

    TV

  • A C-SPAN release announced, “C-SPAN, the political network of record, will air LIVE coverage of the House Oversight and Government Reform hearing on the Mitchell Report and the illegal use of steroids in Major League Baseball. Live coverage will begin Tuesday, January 15th at 9:30 AM ET on C-SPAN2 and C-SPAN Radio. The hearing will also be available LIVE through streaming video at: www.c-span.org.”

  • David Carr on Election 2008 being a runaway hit.

  • An NBC release announced, “‘NBC Nightly News’ anchor Brian Williams will moderate a debate among the Democratic presidential candidates Tuesday, Jan. 15, 9-11 p.m. ET, live on MSNBC from the Cashman Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sen. Barack Obama, Sen. Hillary Clinton and former Sen. John Edwards will participate. The debate, to focus on issues important to minority voters, is sponsored by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, 100 Black Men of America, IMPACTO, the Democratic African-American Leadership Council, the College of Southern Nevada and the Nevada Democratic Party.”

  • “MASN grabs ‘Rookie of the Year’” writes The Examiner’s Jim Williams.

  • Media Matters on Chris Matthews’ “problem”: “Put simply, Matthews behaves as though he is obsessed with Hillary Clinton. And not ‘obsessed in a charming, mostly harmless, Lloyd-Dobler-with-a-boom-box kind of way. ‘Obsessed’ in a this-person-needs-help kind of way.” Feministing also joins the anti-Matthews movement. CJR reports on “The Anti-Chris Matthews Vote” and AP’s David Bauder also joins in.

  • Mixed Media writes,Bill O’Reilly thinks he knows why everyone gangs up Fox News: because it’s so darn successful.”

  • “If MSNBC anchor Keith Olbermann were to write a book about Office Politics 101, he’d call it ‘Do As I Write, Not As I Did for 20 Years.’ Olbermann discusses office politics and other issues in the February issue of Men’s Journal magazine, out yesterday.” TVNewser has the details.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Time Warner Inc., the world’s largest media company, arranged $2 billion in three-year, unsecured financing to repay debt that will be coming due.”

  • Reuters reports, “CBS Corp will see growth in 2008 in ‘every single division’ and no short-term effects from a looming economic downturn or Hollywood’s writers strike, Chief Executive Les Moonves told analysts on Thursday.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “A group that includes Google Inc. and Microsoft Corp. accused broadcast-industry lobbyists of interfering with U.S. regulators’ tests of mobile Internet devices that operate on unused television airwaves.”

  • FOX News Channel tell us it had its highest-rated debate/event so far this ’07-’08 political season, according to Nielsen Media Research with the South Carolina Republican event from last Thursday. Check out the AP’s analysis of the debate. TVNewser reports, “In early Nielsen estimates, Fox News Channel’s airing of the GOP debate last night drew 3.6M Total Viewers and 1.04M in the A25-54 demo. If the numbers hold, it will be FNC’s highest rated debate yet and the 5th most watched of this election cycle.”

  • Kucinich Invited, Then Uninvited, to MSNBC Debate

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC Chief Political Correspondent ‘Campaign’ Carl Cameron tells TV Guide’s Stephen Battaglio he still thrives on Presidential campaign coverage: ‘There is absolutely no story anywhere in the world that is this significant. It’s the struggle for leadership in the free world. That’s better than any adrenaline or Red Bull you could possibly imagine.’”

    Top of post

    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Check out the special edition of American Observer put together by the AU journalism students while they were on the campaign trail in New Hampshire.

  • Former Gannett-er Jim Hopkins tell us “10 things” about him.

  • Dow Jones reports, “News Corp. (NWS) denied Thursday making any offer for Monster Worldwide Inc. (MNST), calling a report on the Seeking Alpha blog untrue. Seeking Alpha reported that News Corp. head Rupert Murdoch sent a letter to the board of the online-recruitment company offering $4.8 billion for it. Monster has a market cap of $3.6 billion.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Yell Group Plc, the publisher of the U.K.’s Yellow Pages phone books, had its biggest gain in London trading in a month on speculation about a bid from Google Inc. Yell rose as much as 4.4 percent, the biggest increase since Dec. 10. The stock climbed 5.50 pence, or 1.7 percent, to 331.25 pence at 8:37 a.m. in London, valuing the company at 2.6 billion pounds ($5.1 billion).”

  • Mickey Kaus continues to hate on Ezra Klein, asking “Is Ezra Klein young enough to be this pompous?”

  • Today, “MonkeySee.com (Great Falls VA) will officially launch a new how-to video site. Visitors to MonkeySee.com can access both free professionally-produced content as well as user-generated video of real experts sharing knowledge, demonstrations, and tips for more successful living on topics that range from fitness to finance and cooking to careers.”

  • Wonkette reports, “we were very pleased this morning to see that Peggy Noonan, our nation’s most beloved newspaper columnist since 1911, mentioned our New Hampshire coverage and a particularly Victorian bit of high-minded satire we dropped along the way”

  • E&P reports, “Calling it a “nationwide experiment,” The New York Times on Thursday launched a new program asking online readers to submit photos of polling places during the ongoing primaries and general election. Dubbed the Polling Place Photo Project, the online initiative hopes to get photos from every polling place in the nation, according to a release.”

  • Street Insider asks, “Could Microsoft (MSFT) Buy Yahoo (YHOO)?”

  • “After a year-long hiatus, NPR’s Office of the Ombudsman is back in business with a weekly Wednesday column, radio appearances and talks.”

    Top of post

    MAGAZINES

  • The Washington Note reported Friday, “An American journalist, Nicholas Schmidle, who authored the article ‘Next Gen Taliban’ that appeared in Sunday’s New York Times Magazine has been deported from Pakistan. He was forced to leave today — Friday, 11 January.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Meet the new twit, same as the old twit. It’s the media, of course. They got it wrong again this week, covering the Democrats in New Hampshire. The think-tankers will be mulling this one for years. After all, they’ll say, we’re not just talking about a few bad predictions here and there. The best brands in the business led the public astray

    Top of post

    JOBS

  • The HealthCentralNetwork.com is looking for an Executive Producer.

  • www.HealthCentral.com is looking for a Web content producer.

  • AARP is looking for a Managing Editor.

  • MarketWatch is looking for a Financial Regulation & Housing Reporter.

  • SourceMedia is looking for a Reporter, The Bond Buyer (Washington Bureau.

  • Bloomberg is looking for a Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac Reporter.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Specialist, Renewals.

  • Modern Luxury Media, LLC is looking for an Advertising Account Executive.

  • Leading Authorities Inc is looking for a CEO Update Editor-in-Chief.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Manager, Group Planning.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Director, Associate Creative.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Marketing Manager, Digital Media.
  • The Chronicle Newspapers is looking for an Editor.

  • NPR is looking for a Producer 1, Digital News, News & Information, Editor l, ll, or lll, Digital News, News & Information and a Production Assistant, NPR Music.

  • Freedom House is looking for an Editorial/Program Assistant (Iran Programs).

  • The Atlantic is offering an Editorial Internship.

  • FDAnews is looking for an Executive Editor.

  • Petersburg Progress-Index is looking for a Sports Reporter/Paginator.

  • FoxSports/Scout.com is seeking a Baseball Reporter.

    Top of post

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 11.06.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Eventually, you want to have kids.

  • News University is hosting, The Electronic Election: Covering the 2008 Vote: A NewsU/Poynter Webinar on November 14. Register here.

  • Poynter Online reports, “NewAssignment.Net, the professional-amateur (pro-am) journalism effort spearheaded by NYU prof Jay Rosen, has a new project underway — and they need beat reporters to help”

  • TVNewser reports, “A cable insider tells TVNewser HOT (the largest cable operator in Israel) took CNN off the air from both their digital and analog platforms at 11:30am local time (5:30amET) this morning. It was replaced with FOX News Channel.”

  • Inside Cable News looks into the “Anatomy of a misquote…”

  • The Huffington Post reports,Mariane Pearl, the widow of murdered Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, spoke out against the media establishment Thursday evening at a party hosted by Glamour to toast the book debut of her collected reporting for the magazine, In Search of Hope.”

  • Wonkette points out the latest snafu from MSNBC.

  • Check out the latest Washington Social Diary.

  • Check out NPR Music, ‘a new, free, comprehensive multimedia music discovery Web site. Featuring on-air and online content aggregated from NPR and the participating stations as well as original-to-NPR Music materials such as interviews, reviews, blogs and live performances.” It launched yesterday.
  • Politico’s Mike Allen writes, “MSNBC’s Chris Matthews, coming off a textbook interview with Michael Gerson, introduces a new feature exclusive to the show’s 7 p.m. edition: ‘The Hardball Power Rankings,’ showing who’s winning at that moment.”
  • TVNewser reports,Bob and Lee Woodruff, both now working for ABC News, are, it turns out, the namesakes for two new characters on ABC’s Desperate Housewives. Marc Cherry, the program’s creator, says in a USA Today interview that the characters, gay partners Bob and Lee, were named for the Woodruffs after Cherry met them at a dinner”
  • B&C reports, “As executive vice president of Fox Business Network, Kevin Magee oversees the channel’s day-to-day operations. Like many people at the just-launched channel, Magee is a veteran of CNBC, cable’s business-news leader in distribution, ratings and revenue. But Magee was not daunted by his former employers’ competitive advantage. ‘Everyone loves a good fistfight,” he said.’”

  • Howard Kurtz reports, “It sounded like a great gotcha story: the Hill newspaper accusing Hillary Rodham Clinton of failing to show up for a Senate hearing on nuclear waste disposal that she herself had requested. And Sen. James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.) was quoted as criticizing the Democratic presidential candidate. But it turned out that Clinton was there — and Inhofe’s quotes were taken from a July press release — prompting an embarrassing correction. ‘Any mistake is regrettable,’ says Hugo Gurdon, the Hill’s editor, ‘but it’s more painful when it negates the story entirely.’”

  • The New York Times reports, “Journalists often call publicists ‘flacks’ and publicists call journalists ‘hacks,’ though rarely in earshot of one another. But the gloves came off last week after Chris Anderson, the executive editor of Wired magazine, chided ‘lazy flacks’ who deluge him with news releases ‘because they can’t be bothered to find out who on my staff, if anyone, might actually be interested in what they’re pitching.’”

  • National Journal hosted a panel discussion featuring National Journal’s Ronald Brownstein and Linda Douglass, The Hotline’s Amy Walter, and moderated by XM’s Rebecca Roberts. Click here to hear the broadcast of the event.
  • What are your favorite political reporters doing for New Year’s Eve? Top of the Ticket takes His Extreme-ness’ story one step further.

  • A reader writes in, “Someone needs to note somewhere that that ’60 Minutes’ piece last night, Sunday, Nov. 4, on the revelation of the con man known as ‘Curve Ball’ who duped the entire United States government, military and 16 intelligence agencies into forging ahead into an unnecessary war that has cost the U.S. about 3,800 lives, was one of the best investigative pieces aired on the show in many, many years. The piece was well-researched and well-produced, and the story produced actual, revelatory, groundbreaking real news on a real, relevant story. The scoop, with worldwide implications, was the type of piece that the show used to do all of the time. Then, two pieces later, the show aired a completely inane, juvenile, non-relevant dog-and-pony show by a flustered, somewhat confused Lesley Stahl about some billionaire who decided to buy a yacht. The piece was worse than some of the newsbreaking pieces in the current issue of ‘National Enquirer.’ In an odd juxtaposition, ’60 Minutes’ revealed a flash of what used to make the show great and displayed a waste of time that showed why the show has tanked for many people.”

  • E&P has “some of the top daily gainers for the six-month period ending September 2007, based on today’s FAS-FAX. The daily average is based on Monday-Friday.”

  • Riehl World View reports, “A few dots to connect here, but it looks like a journalist, John Cheeves of the Lexington-Herald-Leader, with current and previous ties to McClatchy and Knight-Ridder respectively, has been involved in one dubious scheme that at least suggested pay for play journalism. And given where his name also turns up, he might not be the most objective journalist to be leading a witch hunt against current Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.”

  • The Associated Press reports, “The PC’s role in Japanese homes is diminishing, as its once-awesome monopoly on processing power is encroached by gadgets such as smart phones that act like pocket-size computers, advanced Internet-connected game consoles, digital video recorders with terabytes of memory.”

  • The Los Angeles Times launched, “The Strike Zone: The Latest on WGA Strike”

  • The Associated Press reports, “An influential advisory firm for institutional shareholders recommended its clients vote in favor of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.’s planned acquisition of rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc.”

  • The New York Times reports, “The broadcast networks are clearly adopting more of an ‘if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em’ philosophy toward the Internet. Harnessing a natural human inclination toward gossip, complaint, prediction and obsession, they are using TV show Web sites to offer clips, outtakes, interviews, games, message boards and blogs — not to mention entire episodes.”

  • Don Surber reports, “Blaming the media for victory”

  • A release announced, “Gibraltar Associates, LLC, a consultancy specializing in risk and reputation management, public affairs and business development, today announced that Tarah Donoghue has joined the company as an Associate in the Washington, DC office. Ms. Donoghue will focus on client communications strategy, policy and strategic messaging. Ms. Donoghue joins Gibraltar Associates from the White House, where she served as Deputy Press Secretary to First Lady Laura Bush from May 2006 to August 2007.”

  • William Powers writes, “To truly understand high-end political journalism requires a secret decoder ring. The actual message of a story is often embedded between the lines or in a passing descriptive detail far down in the text. In this case, the operative moment came well after the jump, at paragraph 18: ‘In a 53-minute interview over a breakfast of boiled eggs (he ate only the egg whites), aboard a chartered jet that brought him here from Chicago, Mr. Obama said Mrs. Clinton had been untruthful or misleading in describing her positions on problems facing the nation.’”

  • AdAge.com reports, “Newsweek’s new management plans to chop its guaranteed paid circulation by 500,000 copies, dropping its promise to advertisers down to 2.6 million paying readers from 3.1 million, those with knowledge of the move said today.”

  • PR People: Are you on this list?

  • Beltway Blogroll reports, “A weekend journalism discussion at the Phillips Foundation has sparked a mini-debate about whether ‘backpack journalism,’ where reporters carry more than pen and pad, is a good development.”

  • Associated Press reports, “Tom Curley, CEO of The Associated Press, called on news executives Thursday to “stop pining” for the past and adapt to the new ways that news is being distributed and consumed.”

  • New York Times reports, “Copyrighted work like a news article or a picture can hop between Web sites as easily as a cut-and-paste command. But more than ever, as that material finds new audiences, the original sources might not get the direct financial benefit — in fact, they might have little idea where their work has spread.”

  • The Deal reports, “And now for something completely different: ‘The long-term outlook for the [newspaper] industry appears to be healthier than that implied by current share prices.’ So Joe Arns of Banc of America Securities LLC reports on initiating coverage of the newspaper sector. Although he may be new to the beat, that doesn’t mean he’s Pollyannaish. In fact, Arns’ forecast for a 5% decline in newspaper ad revenues next year is more bearish than the Street consensus of a 3% decline.”

  • Reuters reports, “The Wall Street Journal said on Sunday that its Web site now has 1 million subscribers, a milestone for a site that charges for access even as other sites are throwing themselves open for free.”

  • “Daily News TV critic David Bianculli says ‘So long & thanks’”

  • FT.com reports, “Tribune Company and the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission are locking horns over the proposed $8.2bn buy-out of the media group by Sam Zell, the real estate entrepreneur, in a stand-off that threatens to derail the deal.”

  • Heard On The Hill reports, “Sen. Patrick Leahy tried out the time-honored strategy of turning the tables in an effort to fend off an aggressive press corps on Wednesday. Cornered by a pack of scribes anxious to query the Vermont Democrat about the troubled nomination of Michael Mukasey to be attorney general, Leahy was attempting to exit the Capitol through a second-floor exit.”

  • Media Matters reports, “In a November 5 post on his campaign news website The Page, Time magazine editor-at-large and senior political analyst Mark Halperin claimed that a Chicago Sun-Times column raising questions about the transparency of Sen. Barack Obama’s (D-IL) presidential bid was the product of opposition research provided by the campaign of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY).”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The digital revolution has given journalists some fantastic tools. Web sites like Google and Wikipedia give us instant access to voluminous research on virtually any subject. Cell phones enable us to become news photographers. Sparked by blogs and YouTube, the Citizen Journalism boom has taken shape.”

  • The Guardian reports,Rupert Murdoch plans to install Times editor Robert Thomson as publisher of the Wall Street Journal next year, according to a senior US media executive.”

  • CJR reports, “The Rhetoric Beat: Why journalism needs one”

  • Whoops. CNBC should know by now how to spell Karl Rove.

    Jobs

  • Politico is hiring a Special Projects Assistant.

  • The Hill is seeking a Political Journalist.

  • USATODAY.com is looking for a Producer, Design Dept. and a digital storyteller.

  • SmartBrief, Inc. is looking for a freelance travel writer, a
    Health Editor and a Copy Editor.

  • Publishing Services LLC is looking for an Associate Publisher.

  • The Montgomery County Sentinel is looking for an Entry Level Reporter.

  • Patuxent Publishing Co. is looking for a General Assignment Reporter.

  • Elsevier is looking for a Reporter.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.22.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • The White House bids farewell to Josh Deckard.

  • A NBC release announced, “‘Meet the Press,’ the longest running television show in the world, reached a programming milestone, airing its 3,000th broadcast last Sunday, October 14. In addition, according to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press’ topped the competition on Sunday, winning in all categories across the
    country and in Washington D.C.”

  • Deb Howell’s weekly column. Clark Hoyt’s too.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday October 14, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers for the fifth straight week. This marks the sixth time in seven weeks ‘This Week’ outperformed ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers. ‘This Week’ is also the only Sunday discussion program up year-to-date (4%) among Total Viewers.”

  • PEJ Talk Show Index for Oct. 7-12 shows, “The debut of Fred Thompson as a GOP debater helped make last week the second-biggest week of the year in the talk show universe for the 2008 presidential campaign. But so did a talk brouhaha over a more tangential topic involving the debate.”

  • Herald Sun reports, “Speaking at News Corp’s annual meeting of stockholders in New York, Mr. Murdoch, said the global media giant’s proven track record spoke for itself. ‘Revenues have grown an average of 14 percent a year over the past five years and operating income is up 14 percent a year on average over the past four years,’ he said.”

  • Food Service Monthly has started a blog! Check it out.

  • PBC announced that “White House Chronicle” now airs on the Washington-Baltimore area’s three major PBS affiliates: WHUT-TV, Channel 32, WETA-TV, Channel 26, and WMPT-TV, Channel 22. Also, XM Satellite Radio will air “White House Chronicle” on P.O.T.U.S. ’08 (Channel 130) every Saturday, beginning Oct. 12.

  • New York Times reports, “Media companies are often criticized for not taking enough risks in choosing television shows, authors, movies and musicians. But when it comes to technology start-ups, their appetite for risk appears to be on the rise.”

  • InternetNews.com reports, “Leading Internet and media companies teamed up … to set ground rules for dealing with copyright infringement in videos uploaded to user-generated content Web sites — and demanding stronger efforts on the part of content hosts.”

  • Reuters reports, “U.S. communications regulators cited conservative commentator Armstrong Williams on Thursday for violating a ban on ‘payola’ in promoting the Bush administration’s education plan.”

  • USA Today reports, “Google’s third-quarter revenue jumped 57%, but a hiring binge and product speculation left Wall Street wondering what the search giant wasn’t revealing.”

  • A reader tells us that NBC4 anchor Wendy Rieger. said her weekly Going Green reports on NBC4 (Tuesdays at 5:00pm) and has been picked up on by New York folks and “mandated that all NBC affiliates show her reports or take up the cause on their own. Even Brian Williams started his own Going Green segment on Nightly News, mainly from what Wendy started here. Way to go!”

  • Rieger is also hosting a gay-youth assistance fundraiser, SMYAL, on November 4. Click here for more details.

  • AP reports, “To test claims by users that Comcast Corp. was blocking some forms of file-sharing traffic, The Associated Press went to the Bible. An AP reporter attempted to download, using file-sharing program BitTorrent, a copy of the King James Bible from two computers in the Philadelphia and San Francisco areas, both of which were connected to the Internet through Comcast cable modems. We picked the Bible for the test because it’s not protected by copyright and the file is a convenient size. In two out of three tries, the transfer was blocked.” Also, the AP reports, “Comcast Corp. actively interferes with attempts by some of its high- speed Internet subscribers to share files online, a move that runs counter to the tradition of treating all types of Net traffic equally.”

  • From Wonkette: “Flipping though an advanced copy of Gonzo: The Life of Hunter S. Thompson, one item popped off the page. Apparently, Thompson used to date Sally Quinn of The Washington Post: ‘He was always pumping me,’ she says of the late journalist’s thirst for Washington gossip.”

  • Find out why his Extreme-ness calls Campaigns & Elections Magazine’s Walter Alarkon “The Best Political Reporter Today.”

  • Roll Call is holding an Adjournment Contest! “Guess, to the minute, the exact date and time that the second chamber of Congress will adjourn sine die for the first session of the 110th Congress. The person who comes closest to the actual time wins. If there is a tie, Roll Call will hold a drawing to determine the winner.” The winner gets a $500 gift certificate to Fogo de Chão. Email your entry to contest@rollcall.com by 5 p.m. Oct. 26.

  • CQ wants to know what you think about CQPolitics.

  • A reader writes in, “perhaps Facebook is more trouble than it’s worth — it’s just another vehicle for self-important journos who are more about capped teeth than reporting…”

  • Politico’s Ken Vogel reports, “Colbert ‘run’ risks breaking law”

  • Lloyd Grove interviews Donnie Deutsch for Portfolio.com, “and gets the adman and CNBC host to address the Ann Coulter interview, his show as a vehicle to pick up women, future marriage and the Fox Business Network.”

  • A reader writes in: “It would be great if Stu Rothenberg started speaking in the third person. George is getting upset!”

  • The Hollywood Reporter reports, “Comedy Central is getting more of Jon Stewart. The network said late Thursday that it has signed an extension with the ‘Daily Show’ host that will keep him around until at least 2010. Stewart’s contract would have expired at the end of 2008.”

  • Mixed Media reports,Tony Snow, the Fox News host-turned White House spokesman-turned unemployed guy, has signed on to be the keynote speaker at this year’s American Magazine Conference. Larry Hackett, managing editor of People, will conduct a Q&A with him. The conversation will be on the record — a good thing, since an attempt three years ago to keep Bill Clinton’s AMC remarks from leaving the room was contemptuously ignored by journalists in attendance. A spokeswoman for the Magazine Publishers of America declined to say if Snow — who left his job as White House spokesman saying he needed to make more money would be paid for the appearance.”

  • Bloomberg reports,Dean Singleton’s MediaNews Group Inc., the largest closely held U.S. newspaper publisher, plans to triple sales from its Internet sites by 2012.”

  • B&C reports, “The Federal Communications Commission issued its first fines for a station airing Armstrong Williams’ Department of Education-paid-for plugs for its ‘No Child Left Behind’ initiative. Station-owner Sinclair Broadcast Group doesn’t plan to pay the fine and said it will take the commission to court.”

  • To clarify, Major Garrett is currently the Chief Congressional Correspondent for FNC, but he was on the trail for the 2004 Presidential race and the 2006 mid-term elections.. he is not new to the campaign trail and has experience on the road covering the beat in previous elections.

  • Check out Mixed Media’s critique of Newsweek’s new design.

  • Mark your calendars! The Washington Blogger November Meetup is Wednesday, November 14, 2007 at 7:00 PM at RFD. Click here for full details.

  • Michael Getler, the PBS Ombudsman, writes, “Frontline, the outstanding (my opinion as well as that of many others) documentary series marked the beginning of its 25th season this week with another look into the often-closed world in which Vice-President Dick Cheney operates. The hour-long debut on Tuesday evening, Oct. 16, was titled ‘Cheney’s Law.’ It was produced by Michael Kirk, who could reasonably be labeled Minister of the Interior for his efforts, over the past six years, in turning out ten Frontline programs that, in one way or another, probed those activities of the Bush administration—whether one agrees with them or not—that have largely developed and been carried on out of public view.”

  • E&P reports, “Although Washington Post Radio was dropped last month after an unsuccessful 18-month run, the paper is still dealing with the fallout. A Newspaper Guild complaint that newsroom staffers had to perform extra work on the broadcast outlet has sparked a National Labor Relations Board hearing set for next week.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Some good news about the media has actually been making headlines. When was the last time that happened? 1974? The bombshell is ProPublica, a brand-new investigative journalism outfit to be launched in January by one of the most respected figures in the newspaper business, longtime Wall Street Journal Managing Editor Paul Steiger.”

  • This week’s TV Q&A from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s Rob Owen responds to questions about ads on WPXI, Jerry Seinfeld’s ‘Bee Movie’ minisodes on NBC and HBO’s ‘Five Days.’”

  • A release announced, “Inspired by Lions For Lambs (starring Robert Redford, Meryl Streep and Tom Cruise), MGM and YOUTUBE have extended the opportunity to submit videos to Youtube in order to win $25,000 for a charity of the winner’s choice. Participants have until October 24th to submit a 90 second video explaining thoughts on key issues and causes in today’s world.” For more info, click here.

    Jobs

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Editor/Writer.

  • The Cecil Whig is looking for a Web-savvy copy editor.

  • The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a Business Reporter.

  • Jamestown Foundation is looking for a Publications Coordinator.

  • The Frederick News Post is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • FDCH is looking for an In-House News Transcriber.

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Satellite Coordinator.

  • Migration Policy Institute is looking for a Director of Communications.

  • Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System is looking for a Technical Editor.

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for an entry level writer.

  • Exchange Monitor Publications, Inc. is looking for Reporters.

  • The Current Newspapers is looking for a full-time reporter.

  • The Associated Press is looking for a Systems Engineer

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Supervising Senior Producer, Weekend Edition, Sunday and an Assistant Editor, Digital Media News.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.15.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Thank you notes on paper are a sweet gesture.

  • FBN: The Schedule

  • Drudge reports that Imus is back.

  • WUSA Hires New Anchor to Join McGinty

  • Clark Hoyt and Deb Howell do some ombudding.

  • Group Plans to Provide Investigative Journalism

  • Washington Monthly’s Paul Glastris is on tonight’s “Colbert Report.”

  • Everybody Sucks: Gawker and the rage of the creative underclass.”

  • NBC announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning on Sunday, October 7, 2007, in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.”

  • Brian Williams to host SNL.

  • An ABC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research for Sunday October 7, ABC News ‘This Week with George Stephanopoulos’ beat CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers for the fourth straight week. This marks the fifth time in six weeks ‘This Week’ outperformed ‘Face the Nation’ among Total Viewers.”

  • Christopher Hitchens vs. Alister McGrath.

  • NBC Dominates RTNDA Awards

  • Fox Puts Its Money on ‘Fun’ Business Channel

  • An NBC release announced, “Valerie Plame Wilson sits down with Meredith Vieira in her first-ever live television interview, on NBC News’ ‘Today,’ Monday, October 22.”

  • Marc Fisher isn’t a huge fan of XM Radio’s new POTUS channel.

  • Judy Miller reviews “Curveball.”

  • Gene Weingarten on how to save the newspaper industry.

  • Michael Murphy, Senior Manager, Media Relations at FNC is leaving the network.

  • The Pulitzer accuracy test.

  • Washington Post Buys CourseAdvisor Online Directory

  • A tipster tells us that Danielle Karson, a longtime WAMU (NPR) reporter and host, has left the station.

  • New York Times reports, “When Zachary McCune, a student at Brown, received an e-mail message from the university telling him he might have broken the law by downloading copyrighted songs, his eyes glazed over the warning and he quickly forgot about it. ‘I already knew what they’d say about file-sharing,’ he said. ‘It’s become a campus cliché.’”

  • From Freakonomics: “Here Are the Answers to Your Craigslist Questions”

  • TVNewser reports, “After 11 years in New Jersey, in a matter of days, MSNBC will make the move into a combined facility on the 3rd, 4th and 5th floors of the GE Building at 30 Rockefeller Center.”

  • Reuters reports, “Viewers have yet to see a single show, but the power of Rupert Murdoch’s name has convinced some that his Fox Business Network has a shot at succeeding, even if it won’t dislodge U.S. business cable news leader CNBC just yet.”

  • New York Times reports, “ABC Reshapes the Evening News for the Web”

  • PR Week reports, “Unions in the media industry face the same challenges as their industrial brethren; they are derided by opponents as vestiges of an obsolete economic model that promote mediocrity and shackle companies from making forward-looking changes.”

  • E&P reports, “ABC Explains New Move to Count Web Traffic — and How It Is Measured”

  • A release announced, “The second annual Slate 60 Conference will honor innovative philanthropy on October 21-22, 2007 at the Clinton Presidential Library in Little Rock, Arkansas. The Slate 60 Conference will feature top philanthropists, including President Bill Clinton, Robert Kennedy, Jr., Eli Broad, actor Michael J. Fox, Carlos Slim Helu, who recently contributed $100 million to the Clinton Giustra Sustainable Growth Initiative, sharing their personal stories in giving and how philanthropic contributions are changing the world. Speakers will discuss innovation in various sectors of philanthropy such as education, health care, and the environment.”

  • Check out the latest edition of Mediabistro’s J-School Confidential. “In this edition of J-School confidential, our Columbia MA student attempts cope with the ever-growing pile of printouts beside her bed.”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “When a challenger takes on the champion, boxing judges don’t award points for effort alone. The upstart almost always has to win by a knockout, pure and simple.”

  • A release announced, “The National Association of Hispanic Journalists urged House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the leadership of the House of Representatives to pass a bill to create a federal shield law that would protect journalists from attempts to try to force them to reveal their confidential sources. A vote on this bill has unexpectedly been scheduled for next Tuesday, Oct. 16.”

  • DCist reports, Christopher Hitchens’ God Is Not Great “was named one of five finalists for the National Book Award for nonfiction.”

  • Washington Whispers reports, “A New Bobble Joins the Debate”

  • PEJ Talk Show Index for the week of Sept. 20 through Oct. 5 shows, “While the rest of the media were focused on private security contractors in Iraq last week, the cable and radio talk hosts spent their time continuing to argue over a controversial phrase by Rush Limbaugh. Plus, another remnant of the Anna Nicole Smith saga makes the top-10 list.”

  • Ralph Hanson writes, “So I was surprised to read that progressive political commentary magazine New Republic decided that an illustration they had commissioned to go with an article about cussing was too offensive to print. The illustration depicts a wide range of offensive terms for sex and excretory functions, along with their more proper acceptable terms. The main link above is to an article from SF Weekly about the article and illustration. And they print the controversial illustration. Be forewarned. The illustration has lots of words on it that you may or may not find offensive.”

  • And from SF Weekly, “New Republic won’t run Ward Schumacker’s illustration along with story about cussing”

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “NBC Universal is dropping the curtain on ‘beautiful downtown Burbank.’ The media company, which made the town of tract houses the butt of endless jokes, but also brought it prominence as the base of ‘The Tonight Show,’ is decamping to nearby Universal Studios. The media company announced today that it will sell much of the 34 acres it owns in Burbank, including the legendary NBC Studios at 3000 W. Alameda Ave.”

  • Media Post reports, “Many Wall Street analysts are lowering earnings expectations for CBS Corp. as they anticipate the worst for the advertising-dependent, pure-play broadcaster being squeezed by shaky program ratings and a soft advertising market. But those warnings may not go far enough.”

  • CNet News.com reports, “Everyone knows Nielsen as the company that measures how many people are glued to their TV sets watching news and sitcoms for what is called Fall Sweeps. The numbers can make or break a new show.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Walt Disney Co. Chief Executive Officer Robert Iger and other media executives urged U.S. regulators to reject a push by Microsoft Corp. and Google Inc. to free some television airwaves for mobile Internet access.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Polish those resumes, kids. ABC News is now offering PAID internships. ABC News hires 75-80 interns every semester. ABC says the interns will earn ‘an hourly wage consistent with media industry standards.’ Probably enough to rent a nice place in Tribeca for the semester.”

  • Inside Cable News points out, “More FNC Blogs.”

  • Mark Gimein writes for Time, “Crack for Journalists: The Economics of Blogging”

  • From “The Long Goodbye Dept.” over at Wonkette check out this and this.

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “Half a century ago, sociologist David Riesman noted that in a mass media age, journalists tend to be cheerleaders for political candidates who have the charisma of entertainers. Reporters do this not because they believe the better entertainer will be the better president, but simply because entertaining candidates draw a bigger crowd for the media’s own product — the news.”

  • Business Week’s Media Centric writes, “Don’t Kill the Nightly News. Really”

  • The Daily Northwestern reports, “Jim Lehrer, the host of PBS’s ‘The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer,’ discussed journalism, and the ‘revolution’ within it Wednesday afternoon in the half-full McCormick Auditorium in Norris University Center.”

  • Discovery to buy HowStuffWorks.com

  • Daily Candy looks at Wolfgang Puck’s new restaurant, The Source.

    Jobs

  • Bright Young Things is looking for contributors.

  • The Hartford Courant is seeking a new Washington Reporter.

  • Reuters is looking for Journalism Interns in Washington DC for Summer 2008.

  • The Daily Progress is seeking a copy editor/page designer.

  • Smithsonian Magazine is looking for an Editorial Assistant and an Assistant Editor.

  • The Washington Monthly is looking for Interns.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Money & Politics Reporter.

  • Pew Research Center is looking for a Communications/Administrative Assistant.

  • La Politica is looking for a Reporter.

  • Biblical Archaeology Society is looking for an Editor.

  • The Nation is looking for a Senior Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.08.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • This is a close one, but you would rather marry a hot poor person over an ugly millionaire.

  • “Lynn Cheney Profiled by CBS Reporter Whose Husband is Her Literary Rep

  • It was one year ago last week that R.W. Apple passed away.

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘Meet the Press with Tim Russert’ was the No. 1 Sunday morning public affairs program, winning the week ending Sunday, September 30 in all categories across the country and in Washington, D.C.”

  • We reported that Brian Dufffy left USNews. As of October 1, Duffy joined join NPR News as Managing Editor.

  • A look at Washington’s Onion office.

  • O’Reilly Lets Loose: Says WH Reporters Need To Be ‘Wiped Out,’ Calls CNN ‘The Pagan Throne’

  • More changes, Radio One to pull the plug on Syndication One

  • Pepsi, erectile dysfunction and ‘MTP?’

  • Ouch. O’Reilly on Scarborough: “Nobody watches Scarborough. He’s like a test pattern.”

  • Robert Novak, Washington Post Chairman Donald Graham, and other jurors and judges give their perspectives on jury duty, October 18, 6 p.m. at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1313 New York Ave., N.W. Washington, D.C. This public forum is produced by Council for Court Excellence.”

  • The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is continuing its series with Presidential candidates. Last week, Dennis Kucinich was featured. Coming up this week, Mike Huckabee, Ron Paul and John McCain.

  • The Congressional Black Caucus Political Education and Leadership Institute (CBC Institute) announced that “a date has been set for a Democratic presidential debate in Myrtle Beach, SC. The debate will be held on the evening of January 17, 2008 and will be produced and broadcast by CNN.”

  • In a release, the American Civil Liberties Union “applauded the Senate Judiciary Committee’s passage of S. 2035, a bill that would give stronger legal protection to journalists and their sources by lessening the chance that they will be arrested or intimidated for their reporting, particularly when using government sources. The legislation shifts authority from the Department of Justice to the federal courts to decide when journalists must disclose information to the government.”

  • Press Gazzette reports, “AOL UK is planning to outsource some editorial operations to India as part of cutbacks that could halve the number of editorial staff at the web portal’s London newsroom, according to insiders.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “The National Association of Broadcasters, seeking to prevent legislation requiring payment of new music royalties by radio stations, asked Congress to investigate the relationship between artists and labels.”

  • Media Week reports, “U.S.News & World Report has launched a new companion Web site that leverages the magazine’s America’s Best franchise. The new site, RankingsandReviews.com, is geared for consumers looking for information prior to making major purchase decisions, such as buying a new car or a digital camera.”

  • AP reports, “Luring new readers means connecting with them on the Internet through blogs, live online chats and interactive databases, industry leaders told newspapers editors Thursday.”

  • E&P reports, “Even as the Olympics pushes ad spending worldwide next year, newspapers’ share of the global advertising market by 2009 will decline to 26.2% from 29.0% in 2006, according to a study released Thursday by the international ad agency ZenithOptimedia.”
  • Mediabistro got NPR’s Adam Davidsonto describe the behind-the-scenes challenges and rewards of chasing international stories for radio.”

  • Mediabistro also spoke to Ken Sunshine’s “about how he’s forged his business by fusing celebrity representation with political interests, and why he doesn’t shy away from tangling with the tabloids.”

  • Where does your favorite pub fall in the Newsprism?

  • Variety reports,Don Imus’ long-rumored return to the radio dial seems to be quickly coming to fruition. The impending deal appears to rule out any potential move to satellite radio. Sirius Satellite Radio chief Mel Karmazin indicated over the summer that he, too, would be interested in doing a deal with Imus.”

  • FT.com reports, “Peter Chernin has been Rupert Murdoch’s right-hand man for more than a decade. … In a video interview with FT.com, Mr Chernin talks about the threat from Facebook, News Corp’s $5bn acquisition of Dow Jones and its Wall Street Journal newspaper and the outlook for the US economy.” For highlights, click here.

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc. shares will reach $700 by the end of next year as the company lures more users to its YouTube video site and companies shift advertising spending to the Web, Bear Stearns & Co. said.”

  • Mediabistro turns 10!

  • Ken Paulson, editor of USA TODAY, has been named a Fellow of the Society of Professional Journalists; “this is the highest honor SPJ bestows upon a journalist for extraordinary contributions to the profession. Also named are Carl Bernstein, Muriel Dobbin, and John Markoff.”

  • Public Eye reports, “Okay, first things first: This space is going to be a ‘cackle’-free zone. No poking fun at irrelevant personal characteristics or foibles. At least not this week. That’s why this writer didn’t pick up on the ‘Chucklegate’ story yesterday, which referenced ‘The Daily Show’ and Jon Stewart. I’m just not going there.”

  • The AP reports, “Five journalists who covered the most tumultuous of 20th Century times are being honored by the Postal Service. These distinguished journalists risked their lives to report the events that shaped the modern world,” said Postmaster General Jack Potter, who announced the stamp series at the Associated Press Managing Editors Meeting in Washington Friday. The stamps are due out next year”

  • MarketWatch’s Jon Friedman writes, “The Cleveland Plain Dealer is bemused — and frustrated — that presidential candidate Dennis Kucinich seems to be freezing out his own hometown newspaper.”

  • National Journal’s William Powers writes, “what’s amazing is how little effect the original O.J. story and its spawn — Anna Nicole Smith being the latest — have had on the serious business of serious news.”

  • RTNDA reports, “The young journalists are bringing a great deal of skill to the newsroom but often give the impression they think a diploma proves they’ve learned all they need to know about the craft.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Today’s Hardball news had us wondering about the show’s EP-less status. Sources tell TVNewser the search continues with a candidate identified, but no announcement is imminent.”
  • Slate’s Jack Shafer writes, “‘The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers’ was Thomas Jefferson’s motto. Drew Curtis shares the sentiment to the extreme in his splenetic takedown of the press, It’s Not News, It’s Fark: How Mass Media Tries To Pass Off Crap As News, which came out late last spring.”

  • Public Eye reports, “You ever have a conversation where you thought afterwards, ‘I wish that had gone a bit better.’ Maybe after a date, or a job interview? According to Matt Elzweig’s new piece for the New York Press, New York Times Magazine writer Deborah Solomon has had that thought. And she decided — on at least two occasions — to change her weekly Q-and-A to be the conversation she wished she’d had.”

  • USA Today reports, “As channel choices and technological options have expanded, fewer of us are watching the same shows at the same time on the same day. And it’s increasingly affecting the national conversation.”

  • Reuters reports, “Yahoo Inc would be worth far more to shareholders if it broke up its Internet businesses or embarked on a major overhaul, including a departure from Web search, but management is unlikely to do either, according to an analyst note issued on Friday.”

  • Chris Matthewstalks about his fascination with politics and his trademark style of rapid-fire questioning” on NPR.

  • ABC News presents a new slideshow: Politicians Behind Bars.

  • Bloomberg reports, “U.S. online advertising spending topped $5 billion in the second quarter, a record for a three- month period, signaling that more advertisers are abandoning newspapers and television.”

    Jobs

  • Washington Life Magazine is looking for an Executive Assistant.

  • Cambridge University Press is looking for a Trade Sales Representative.

  • Business Financial Publishing is looking for a Director of Operations

  • The Wall Street Journal is looking for a part time News Assistant.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.01.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Who should play Obama in a movie? The Illinois senator says Denzel Washington.

  • Most of you have not even used a VHS in more than a year. Do you even own one anymore?

  • Happy belated birthday to Roll Call’s Emily Heil. Her birthday was Friday.

  • Regarding this, a reader writes in, “Makes me like Russert better!! And maybe he’ll gather some new lyrics to quote at the Radio/TV Correspondents’ dinner.”

  • Reuters reports, “Many executives attending the fourth annual Advertising Week conference admitted that they had misjudged exactly what consumers want these days. Figuring that out may be the advertising and media industry’s top challenge, they said.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “Democratic Federal Communications Commission member Michael Copps set a high bar Thursday for approval of three media mergers before the agency as he questioned whether the proposed deals were in the public interest.”

  • USA Today: “Return of 1999? Dot-coms making a comeback

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “CBS Corp. thinks Web surfers would rather watch a blooper reel from the sitcom ‘How I Met Your Mother’ than an actual episode of the show. To cater to what it believes is the short attention span of online audiences, the network today is launching CBS EyeLab, a digital-production studio that will create and distribute short clips cut together from the network’s most popular shows.”

  • Business Week reports, “Fox vs. CNBC: Countdown To War
    Fox Business: Network has the deep pockets and patience of News Corp. behind it. It’ll need them”

  • Multichannel.com reports, “Al Jazeera English chief Nigel Parsons says the network is stepping up efforts to gain U.S. cable or satellite TV distribution, and talks are going well with ‘one of the majors.’”

  • Poynter Online’s Thomas T. Huang writes, “The digital world can help the reader deepen his understanding of his own community — and build connections within that community. We need to take advantage of that.”

  • B&C reports, “Hearst-Argyle Television’s special committee appointed to consider the tender offer by Hearst said the offer is inadequate.”

  • Conde Nast Chairman S.I. Newhouse Jr. sat down Wednesday with Portfolio Editor-in-Chief Joanne Lipman to take a very serious look at every page in the upcoming November issue of Portfolio, his $100 million pet project.

  • Reuters reports, “The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued Bloomberg LP on Thursday, alleging the news service had discriminated against pregnant employees by cutting their pay and demoting them.”

  • On Thursday, CNN’s Candy Crowley conducted the first interview to take place on CNN’s Election Express. Crowley spoke to John Edwards in New Hampshire.

  • Information Week reports, “Managing mixed voltage interfaces between portable devices and memory cards”

  • Two years ago on September 29, Judith Miller was released from jail.

  • Gawker reports, “Newspapers Now Stuffed Full Of Blogs, But No Clue Where To Put Them”

  • DCist reports, “FOUND Magazine has a knack for revealing the beautiful underbelly of America, the forgotten parts of our everyday lives.”

  • A tipster tells us, “The NY Times mag piece about DC spelled Rep. Jane Harman’s name wrong.”

  • A reader writes in, “Regarding the NYT Mag article: Where’s Jenny 8. Lee when you need her?”

  • National Journal’s William Powers on You Tube: “Because, unlike newspapers and other traditional media, they are hip and popular. In contrast to the bottled quotes and factoids of traditional journalism, they seem unfiltered. And they draw Web traffic, which makes them valuable (clicks equal cash).”

  • Slate Gabfest Podcast now on XM Radio at 6pm Friday on channel 130 the POTUS 08 channel.

  • Poynter Online’s Peter Zollman writes, “Billions of dollars in revenue; now often considered the ‘bad guy’ even though its slogan is ‘Don’t be evil;’ stunning market share in search; worldwide growth; more initiatives underway than seemingly dozens of other companies…Amazing. And it isn’t even 10 years old. By contrast, eBay launched 12 years ago. Yahoo began as a student hobby in February 1994. So both are older, by far — at least in Internet terms.”

  • Feministing.com awarded Chris Matthews asking Sen. Chris Dodd: “Do you find it difficult to debate a woman?” the “Sexist (and stupid) quote of the day”

  • Potomac Flacks reports, “Jennifer Moire, previously head of media relations at C-SPAN, has launched Lyon Park Public Relations (www.lyonparkpr.com).”

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell examines the
    Post coverage of the sad Sept. 17 killing of 14-year-old DeOnte Rawlings.

  • Wall Street Journal presents, “Read All About It! A veteran reporter and editor’s favorite books about newspapering.”

  • New York Times’ Public Editor writes, “Last Sunday’s column about the MoveOn.org advertisement prompted more than 350 messages from readers. The vast majority took issue with one aspect of the column or another.”

    Jobs

  • The Center for American Progress is looking for an Editor, CampusProgress.org

  • World Wildlife Fund is looking for a Creative Services Writer.

  • Thomson Tax & Accounting is looking for a Reporter/Author — News Service.

  • National Geographic Society is looking for a Senior Photo Editor

  • Media General, Inc. is looking for a Senior Multimedia Producer

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Sr. Business Analyst, Deputy Managing Editor, News & Information and a Supervising Senior Producer, Weekend All Things Considered.

  • Publishing Services LLC is looking for a Marketing Editor.

  • Daily News-Record is looking for a Staff Writer.

  • The Daily Progress is looking for a News editor/copy desk chief.

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Correspondent.

  • The Magazine Group is looking for an Art Director.

  • Solutions at Home is looking for an Advertising Account Executive.

    http://www.mediabistro.com/joblistings/jobview.asp?joid=64922&c=mbeajob

  • National Geographic Society is looking for an Account Manager.

  • International Brotherhood of Teamsters are looking for a Staff Writer and a Project Manager.

  • Australian Broadcasting Corporation is looking for a Producer.

  • The Daily Press is looking for a Copy Editor.

  • PBS Newshour is looking for a Broadcast Desk Assistant.

  • The Advisory Board Company is looking for an entry level staff writer.

  • Inside Lacrosse is looking for a Copy Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • National Journal Launches “The Daily Dose”

    This week’s issue of National Journal (out today), includes the inaugural edition of a new feature that will appear occasionally in the magazine: a media Q&A conducted by Media Columnist William Powers dubbed “The Daily Dose: Media Habits of the Smart Set.” In the first edition, Bill speaks with Librarian of Congress James H. Billington, who has some interesting things to say about his reading list as well as the effect of the Internet on our culture.

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