TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

AMC 2007: ‘Don’t Put Content on Lockdown’ Google Exec Urges Mag Eds

Tuesday AMC 2007 Google.jpg
Even the most highly branded magazines, like Forbes and TV Guide see their online traffic dwarfed by that of “media interlopers” like Yahoo! and MySpace, Eileen Naughton, Google’s director of media platforms, said today at AMC.

“Search is a proxy for a brand’s vitality,” Google media platforms director Eileen Naughton asserted to a roomful of magazine executives at AMC today in Boca Raton. “Search is a core consumer behavior that defines our times; it’s an activity at the essence of what it is to be human,” she said in her keynote talk entitled “Insights From Google,” urging the content providers in the room to make their material as accessible as possible to users so magazines might benefit from the kind of online popularity driving tens of thousands of users to younger brands such as Facebook, Google and Yahoo!. “Newer entrants to the media landscape are quite disruptive to the media status quo,” Naughton said. But why?


“Tech companies now sit squarely in the middle of the media space,” she said, “and these media interlopers are innovating the ways advertising is targeted, measured, bought, priced and sold.” But, striking a brighter note, she pointed out that “brands do matter on the Web.” Illustrating just how, she borrowed “the long tail” meme from Wired‘s Chris Anderson, and showed a slide that put online behemoths like Yahoo!, Google, MySpace and FaceBook at the head, and some of the magazine world’s strongest brands — People and TV Guide among them — along the end of the tail. The key to success for magazines, Naughton said, was for mag execs to figure out how they can “get in on the head of the tail.”

One way to do this is through partnering, an approach advocated by many of AMC’s speakers versed in new media, with Naughton suggesting that magazine editors be “atomizing their content” as much as possible to get it placed across a variety of different mediums — mobile, social networking sites, video sites and more. “Make sure search engines can find your stuff,” she urged. “Don’t put it behind paid walls, don’t put it on lockdown. Tag your story archives, photos, video clips and make them freely available.”

RELATED:

  • AMC 2007: ‘Privacy is an Old Man’s Concern’ LinkedIn Prez Says
  • AMC 2007: User-Generated Content Cues: ‘Set Up the Scenario and Then Get Out of the Way’
  • AMC 2007: Adam Moss on Being EIC: ‘You Get Paid to Be a Dilettante
  • AMC 2007: NBC Prez: Content Providers Must Know Consumers ‘Like We’ve Never Known Them Before’
  • AMC 2007: Rather Warns of ‘Inevitability’ in Presidential Race
  • AMC 2007: Mag Publishing ‘Behind’ on Integrated Marketing
  • AMC 2007: ASME Opens Eight Ellie Categories to Online Entrants
  • AMC 2007: Online, ‘The Consumer Is Way Ahead of Us’
  • AMC 2007: It’s ‘Miss Black,’ Says Cathie; Eds Take Page From Entourage, Hug It Out
  • AMC 2007: Better Homes & Gardens Anointed Ad Age Magazine of the Year
  • AMC 2007: Former White House Press Secretary Tony Snow: “There Are Raging Arguments” Within Bush’s White House
  • AMC 2007: Blame it on the Rain (or the Assistant)
  • So What Do You Do, Howard Polskin, Sr. VP, Magazine Publishers of America
  • So What Do You Do, Cindi Leive, Editor, Glamour?
  • Mediabistro Course

    Travel Writing

    Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now!