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Donya Blaze

HBO’s Veep Picks Up Three Emmy Nominations

Congratulations are in order for New York mag’s Frank Rich and the crew at HBO’s Veep. The send-up of Washington politics just picked up Emmy nominations for Outstanding Comedy Series,  Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series for star Julia Louis-Dreyfus, and Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series.

Rich is an executive producer for the show and by far one of the most likable Media Beat guests we’ve had. So, we couldn’t think of a better person to get such an honor. Don’t believe me? Check out the video for yourself.

Part 2: Frank Rich Compares New York Times andNew York Magazine
Part 3: New York‘s Frank Rich Breaks Down 2012 Presidential Election, Talks Media Bias

HBO’s Veep Picks Up Three Emmy Nominations

Congratulations are in order for New York mag’s Frank Rich and the crew at HBO’s Veep. The send-up of Washington politics just picked up Emmy nominations for Outstanding Comedy Series,  Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series for star Julia Louis-Dreyfus, and Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series.

Rich is an executive producer for the show and by far one of the most likable Media Beat guests we’ve had. So, we couldn’t think of a better person to get such an honor. Don’t believe me? Check out the video for yourself.

Part 2: Frank Rich Compares New York Times andNew York Magazine
Part 3: New York‘s Frank Rich Breaks Down 2012 Presidential Election, Talks Media Bias

Lucky‘s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

Media Beat banner

In the final segment of our Media Beat interview with Lucky editor-in-chief Brandon Holley, the print vet talked about the explosion of street style, where women can find designer goods (or versions of them) for cheap, and that hot-button issue every magazine editor grapples with: Photoshop.

Sure, a petition against Seventeen has the pub pledging to feature more “healthy, real women,” but is it even possible for a magazine to succeed without airbrushing its models? Uh, no, said Holley.

“I’ve done a bunch of focus groups, and women will constantly say, ‘Why don’t you just put a real person on the cover? I don’t wanna see a celebrity.’ That cover would sell 10 copies,” said Holley. “So, what women say they want and what they want are two different things sometimes. I mean, we do need to show more women with real bodies, absolutely. But I don’t think that should be a dead set rule.”

Part 1: Lucky EIC Brandon Holley on Getting a Magazine Job
Part 2: Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’

Lucky’s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

Media Beat banner

In the final segment of our Media Beat interview with Lucky editor-in-chief Brandon Holley, the print vet talked about the explosion of street style, where women can find designer goods (or versions of them) for cheap, and that hot-button issue every magazine editor grapples with: Photoshop.

Sure, a petition against Seventeen has the pub pledging to feature more “healthy, real women,” but is it even possible for a magazine to succeed without airbrushing its models? Uh, no, said Holley.

“I’ve done a bunch of focus groups, and women will constantly say, ‘Why don’t you just put a real person on the cover? I don’t wanna see a celebrity.’ That cover would sell 10 copies,” said Holley. “So, what women say they want and what they want are two different things sometimes. I mean, we do need to show more women with real bodies, absolutely. But I don’t think that should be a dead set rule.”

Part 1: Lucky EIC Brandon Holley on Getting a Magazine Job
Part 2: Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’

Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’

They say if you can’t beat ‘em join ‘em… or, do one better and let ‘em eat off your plate. That’s Lucky editor-in-chief Brandon Holley‘s approach to the Web.

In the second installment of our Media Beat interview, Holley, who once headed Yahoo! Shine, said she realized pretty early that the days of finding new readers “on the back of a CVS newsstand somewhere” are over.

“Fashion blogging, to me, is the most exciting thing that’s happened in publishing in decades. It’s really created a new tier of content, and you can either separate yourself from that content or you can bring it in,” she explained. “One way that we bring it in is we have a desk where bloggers can come in and sit — they’re called our Lucky Style Collective — they contribute content to the magazine; they contribute certainly online. So, it’s a sharing of pockets of audience.”

Part 1: Lucky EIC Brandon Holley on Getting a Magazine Job
Part 3: Lucky’s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’

They say if you can’t beat ‘em join ‘em… or, do one better and let ‘em eat off your plate. That’s Lucky editor-in-chief Brandon Holley‘s approach to the Web.

In the second installment of our Media Beat interview, Holley, who once headed Yahoo! Shine, said she realized pretty early that the days of finding new readers “on the back of a CVS newsstand somewhere” are over.

“Fashion blogging, to me, is the most exciting thing that’s happened in publishing in decades. It’s really created a new tier of content, and you can either separate yourself from that content or you can bring it in,” she explained. “One way that we bring it in is we have a desk where bloggers can come in and sit — they’re called our Lucky Style Collective — they contribute content to the magazine; they contribute certainly online. So, it’s a sharing of pockets of audience.”

Part 1:Lucky EIC Brandon Holley on Getting a Magazine Job
Part 3: Lucky’s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

Lucky EIC Brandon Holley on Getting a Magazine Job

Brandon Holley held editor positions at Time Out and GQ, helped launch Elle Girl and headed Yahoo! Shine before taking the helm at Lucky in 2011. And, she says, if you want to snag a top spot on a magazine masthead, you need to be a vocal and proactive voice for the brand.

“I think people make a mistake when they wanna climb the masthead, and they assume the editor-in-chief should pay attention to them. And, now that I’m on the other side of the desk, I love people who come to me,” Holley said in our Media Beat interview.

Holley explained that she made a name for herself at GQ by giving “steady input without being annoying” to editor-in-chief Art Cooper. “I wasn’t kissing ass, but I would write memos to him and say, ‘I think this section could use this,’ and ‘I think we should start a new section that’s this’… I’m a huge fan of memo writing.”

The EIC also debunked that rumor about Lucky going all-digital or scaling back its print frequency. “That was a weird misunderstanding of our mission,” she said.

Part 2: Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’
Part 3: Lucky’s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

Pitch Bay Area Culture to San Francisco

You don’t have to live in the Bay Area, but you do have to be familiar with its culture in order to pitch San Francisco magazine. And with new FOB sections ranging from politics to food to fashion, there is ample opportunity for any freelancer to write for this regional glossy, no matter where you’re from.

“It’s big-city journalism on a number of levels. We have in-depth feature reporting on civic issues, social justice, politics and personalities in power positions. Then, we cover the service side: how to live the good life in a vibrant, exciting, constantly changing city. Then there’s our food, style and cultural coverage,” said editor-in-chief Jon Steinberg.

For editors’ contact information, read How to Pitch: San Francisco. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Andrea Hackett

How to Land a Byline in Variety

VarietyIf you’re looking to get published in Variety, you better make your pitches good. Editors at the pub’s daily and weekly versions typically generate story ideas themselves and assign them to writers they trust, but they are willing to work with newbies — as long as the hook is compelling.

“We recently did profiles of major entertainment industry deal makers, and some of the individuals pitched came from outside writers,” said deputy editor Peter Caranicas. “We look for stories that demonstrate intimate knowledge of the entertainment business and access to high-level sources.”

Get editors’ contact info in How To Pitch: Variety.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

How Writers Can Find Their Next Story

magnifyingphoto.jpgIn Mediabistro’s latest AvantGuild feature, writers and editors detail their methods for generating new and interesting content long after the creativity well runs dry. For example:

Check out the competition

“Looking at the competition can help spark ideas that could fill gaps or news they’re not covering,” said Nick Barber, a tech reporter for IDG. If you read a piece another outlet wrote about a subject, ask yourself what’s missing or try to look at the piece from the opposite point of view. “Sometimes a fresh perspective can help generate something new,” Barber added.

Pressed for time? Set up Google Alerts for any topics you’re interested in and watch the ideas flow into your inbox. And the competition doesn’t always have to be in your exact field. If you’re a food writer, a quick check of Wired.com might unearth a profile of someone whose innovative freezing technology could be weaved into that piece on homemade ice cream you’ve been brainstorming. Or, maybe it’s a blurb on The Wrap about Lindsay Lohan‘s latest #fail that is the catalyst for your next parenting piece on preteen discipline. The idea is to keep your eyes peeled and your reporter’s cap on at all times.

For seven more sources of inspiration, read 8 Places to Find Your Next Story [subscription required]

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