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Journos

From Nelson Mandela’s 90th Birthday Party to Inside Climate News

In the picturesque city of Portland, Maine, The Forecaster comes out once a week to keep area residents informed about the latest news and sports happenings. But there’s also room for other topics.

SabrinaShankmanTwitterProfilePicTo wit, The Forecaster currently has a wonderful profile of 30-year-old area native Sabrina Shankman (pictured). After undergraduate journalism studies at NYU, she did her graduate work at UC Berkeley, where she made time for a very unusual detour:

During grad school, Shankman did a summer internship with the South African bureau of the Associated Press in Johannesburg. She covered stories ranging from Nelson Mandela‘s 90th birthday, to violent elections in Zimbabwe, to the burgeoning South African snowboarding scene.

“I was there for just two months, but it was a hell of an experience,” Shankman said.

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Ted Conover Revisits Harper’s Undercover Assignment

TedConoverPicThe article, titled “The Way of All Flesh,” ran in the May 2013 issue of Harper’s magazine. This week, author Ted Conover revisited his experiences going undercover as a USDA meat inspector in a Midwestern industrial slaughterhouse for the piece, as part of a Morse College master’s tea discussion at Yale University.

He told students that going undercover is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, he was surprised by the kinds of personal connections he was able to establish with other slaughterhouse workers. On the other, that kind of connection is only possible up to a point:

“I don’t think you can feel you really belong if you’re undercover, because you can’t express yourself in a full and honest way,” Conover said. “It’s a form of research I don’t recommend, because it’s hard over time to not be able to feel you belong or tell your friends back home.”

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Norah O’Donnell: ‘Those Tapes Will Never See the Light of Day’

NorahODonnellCBSCBS This Morning co-host Norah O’Donnell made headlines this week thanks to a rare interview with His Holiness, the Dalai Lama. But she was also part of a fun little item by Reuters NYC correspondent Chris Taylor.

Taylor, after recently asking some finance gurus about their first jobs, decided to pose the same question to high-profile journalists. O’Donnell’s answer is hard to beat. At age 10, with her father stationed with the military in Seoul, South Korea, she agreed to help create some English-language learning tapes to help her fellow students meet a middle school requirement:

“That rolled into doing a TV program for the Korean equivalent of PBS. It was 30 minutes every week, I sat in the middle of a Korean woman and an American guy, and we would do little skits in English and Korean.”

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Business Insider Welcomes Four New Media Figures to the ‘Silicon Alley 100′

The website’s annual “Silicon Alley 100″ list is set to post Thursday at 8 a.m. However, to whet everyone’s appetite, the BI folks were kind enough to give FishbowlNY an advance peek at the media folks represented.

BusinessInsiderLogoNew to the list:

Eli Pariser, Peter Koechley / Upworthy
Rich Antoniello / Complex Media
Bryan Goldberg /  Bustle

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Glenn Greenwald Leaving Guardian for ‘Once-in-a-Career Dream Journalistic Opportunity’

GleenGreenwaldTwitterProfilePicSome very big journalism news is being broken this afternoon by BuzzFeed’s Ben Smith. Although major details are still to be announced, the gist is that Glenn Greenwald is leaving The Guardian:

Greenwald declined to comment on the precise scale of the new venture or on its budget, but he said it would be “a very well-funded… very substantial new media outlet.” He said the source of funding will be public when the venture is officially announced.

“My role, aside from reporting and writing for it, is to create the entire journalism unit from the ground up by recruiting the journalists and editors who share the same journalistic ethos and shaping the whole thing — but especially the political journalism part — in the image of the journalism I respect most,” he said.

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NYT Correspondent: A Watergate Scandal Would Never Be Uncovered by Journalists Today

MarkLeibovichThisTownIn recent years, as Ken Auletta discussed not too long ago on PBS NewsHour alongside David Carr, The Guardian has broken three massive, Woodward & Bernstein-like stories. But over in D.C., at least according to New York Times Magazine chief national correspondent Mark Leibovich, it’s a much sadder story.

Liebovich spoke on Wednesday to students at the University of Montana as part of the President’s Lectures Series. Per a report in the Montana Kaimin by Andrew Visscher, he says it all has to do with the rise of D.C. self-congratulation:

The media provides the fuel necessary for this new order of self-seeking politicians, Leibovich said. He claims a journalistic takedown like Watergate could never happen in modern times, where journalists are often more focused on Facebook statuses and Twitter followers.

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Religion Writer Recalls a Very Grateful New York Times

CCSULogoHow times have changed. Today, getting a personal response from a recruiter or HR person advertising an online journalism job is a modern-age miracle. But as New York Times religion writer Mark Oppenheimer told a group of Central Connecticut State University students Tuesday night, when he applied to the Gray Lady it was a different story.

From a write-up of the event by New Britain Herald reporter Brian M. Johnson:

After college, Oppenheimer became a writer for the Hartford Courant before his wife convinced him to apply for a job at the New York Times following the retirement of previous religion writer Peter Steinfels.

“I sent them an email saying I realize you’ve probably already filled the job but I’d like to apply,” he said. “They replied almost immediately saying ‘Thank god we heard from you, we didn’t think anyone was going to want it and we were going to drop the column.’”

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Deadline’s Mike Fleming is Going Bicoastal

DeadlineHollywoodlogoBeginning next month, Nikki Finke‘s tireless film editor will divide his time equally each month between Long Island and Los Angeles. It’s a big change for Fleming, one he wants you to know is not an indication of troubles at the mother ship:

I think Deadline is thriving despite a recent batch of articles implying otherwise, and it pisses me off when journalists cheap shot us (I disagree with New York Times’ reporter Brooks Barnes and his assessment that Deadline has grown bland. The only thing that concerns me is Barnes could teach a master class on how to write blandly, so he’s as close to an authority as you’ll find on the subject).

Ha ha. Fleming goes on to share all sorts of great recollections: how his showbiz reporter career began accidentally in connection with a project involving Ralph Macchio, Emilio Estevez and Peter Bart; how a Long Dong Silver porn tape threw Variety parent company execs for a loop; how a trial run living in LA was ended by his wife’s ultimatum; and how Disney learned to live with his Jessica Rabbit revelations.

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Seymour Hersh Unloads on New York Times, Other Topics

SeymourHershNewYorkerPicGuardian media and tech journalist Lisa O’Carroll had a rip roaring conversation with famed investigative journalist and author Seymour Hersh. Translation: various MSM outlets will be putting extra emphasis today on TGIF:

Don’t even get him started on the New York Times which, he says, spends “so much more time carrying water for Obama than I ever thought they would” – or the death of Osama bin Laden. “Nothing’s been done about that story, it’s one big lie, not one word of it is true,” he says of the dramatic US Navy Seals raid in 2011.

That last part sounds like a battle cry. If there is zero truth to the Zero Dark Thirty narrative, a great story is waiting there for an intrepid and well-funded journo(s).

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NYT Public Editor Makes News in Buffalo

MargaretSullivanHeadshotThere’s some nice history coursing through this report about a talk Margaret Sullivan gave last night in Buffalo. The locale of the event, the Larkin Filling Station, was built in 1930 as part of the first-ever chain of service gas stations. And the article about what transpired appears in The Spectrum, a University of Buffalo student paper launched in 1950.

Managing editor Sara Dinatale notes that this was Sullivan’s first public return to the “Queen City” since leaving the post of executive editor of the Buffalo News for the New York Times. She retraces, briefly, a remarkable local ascension and then gets to various bits of nitty gritty:

Sullivan recalled something one of the The Times’ managing editors told her about “imposter syndrome.” It’s the idea that no one at the Times feels like they deserve to work there, so they all work hard to prove they’re worthy of their positions. It creates a competitive environment…

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