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People Names Kate Upton ‘Sexiest Woman Alive’

ShutterstockKateUpton

We have BREAKING NEWS: Kate Upton is an attractive woman. Most of America had been unsure about that until just last night, when People dubbed her the Sexiest Woman Alive.

“The national debate has finally ended,” said President Obama. “This is a truly great day for the nation. May god bless Ms. Upton, and may god bless America.”

Despite the official status, some remained skeptics. An Ohio man stated “Kate Upton? Never heard of her. Now, my girlfriend Julie, there’s a looker.”

FishbowlNY attempted to reach Julie for comment but were unable to verify that she actually existed.

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Britney Spears (We Think) Covers Women’s Health

Britney Spears — or at least someone we’re being told is Britney Spears — is Women’s Health’s latest cover star.

We’re not even talking about her body; it’s her face. Spears looks like a completely different person. That’s either a lot of makeup, bad Photoshop, or one hell of a nose job.

Magazine Launches and Closures Both Up in 2014

magazines_articleIt was both a good year and a bad year for magazines. Because we’re magazine fans, let’s start with the good news: The number of new titles launched in 2014 was up from last year. Now, the bad news: The number of closures also increased.

According to MediaFinder, 190 magazines made their debut in 2014, while 99 were folded. Last year 156 magazines launched and 56 were shuttered.

The categories for magazines making their debut in 2014 included regional (23 new magazines), health (eight), and food, home, and children with six new titles each. Automotive and craft publications were hit with the most closures.

Overall, we had a net gain of 99 magazines this year. That’s not too bad!

Ian Bremmer Joins Time

Ian Bremmer GIan Bremmer is joining Time as a foreign affairs columnist and editor-at-large. Bremmer is the president and founder of Eurasia Group, a political risk research and consulting firm. He is also a Global Research Professor at NYU.

Bremmer is also a published author, and is regularly sought out for his views on political issues by a variety of publications.

Bremmer’s first piece for Time in online now. It will appear in Time’s December 29 issue, which hits newsstands Monday. He will write two weekly columns, one online and one in print. His focus will be the global economy, geopolitics and finance.

Hearst Increases TrendingNY Publishing Frequency

Hearst Magazines is increasing the publishing frequency of TrendingNY, its free weekly fashion magazine aimed at young women. TrendingNY made its debut in September and four issues were printed. Starting with the new year, Hearst will publish nine issues.

Each issue of TrendingNY is distributed during the first week of the month by street teams in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. Sorry, Bronx and Staten Island.

Ellen Levine, Hearst Magazines’ editorial director, said the response from readers was positive, and that’s not surprising. People love free stuff. Even if it is mostly just a collection of ads.

“With every pilot, we ask for reader feedback so we can tweak as we go,” said Levine, in a statement. “Young women responded to its bold, happy, vibrant look and newsy information on trends, and felt the fast format was original and refreshing, which was our goal from the start.”

People and Time Reduce Rate Bases

Time_magazine_logoPeople and Time are trimming their rate bases. According to Ad Age, People will reduce its circulation guarentee by 50,000 copies per issue and Time will cut its guarantee by 250,000 copies per issue. Beginning in January, People’s new rate base will be 3.4 million; Time’s 3.4  million.

The change is odd, as typically, the higher a magazine’s rate base the more it can charge advertisers for ads. A Time spokesperson told Ad Age that the magazine cut its circulation guarantee out of a ”desire to optimize… marketing spend and cut less profitable circulation.”

In other words, this might have something to do with MediaVest — a huge media buying agency — who announced it will no longer count tablet subscriptions when considering magazines’ rate bases. By doing so, magazines might not be able to charge as much for ads.

The Time spokesperson, of course, denied MediaVest’s move had anything to do with it. “It felt like it was time to make a cut” said the person.

Daily Show’s Jessica Williams Covers Wired

The Daily Show correspondent Jessica Williams is Wired’s latest cover star. That is one insanely bright front page. Inside the issue, Williams discusses her dream — to become a media mogul.

“The world is ready for a more sophisticated TMZ,” explained Williams. “If there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that any dummy with a half-decent idea can become a billionaire. And hell, I’ve always wanted to become a media mogul. So allow me to introduce JMZ!”

People’s Robin Williams Issue a Best Seller

cover-435Proving that everyone loves a sad story about a complete stranger, People’s August 25th edition — honoring Robin Williams’ life and tragic death — was its number one selling issue of 2014.

Adweek reports that 1,169,800 copies of People’s Williams issue were sold. On the flip side, People’s June 16 edition, with Hillary Clinton on the cover, was its worst selling issue. It sold only 503,890 copies.

Williams’ death was also the big seller for another gossip rag — InTouch. Its August 25th edition moved 571,780 copies, making it InTouch’s best selling issue of the year.

InTouch‘s worst seller of 2014 was an issue that featured The Bachelorette’s Ashley Hebert announcing that she was pregnant. Congratulations! No one cared.

The Week Closes Comments Section

The Week is shutting down the comments section on its website. Ben Frumin, editor-in-chief of TheWeek.com, explains that when it comes to comments on articles, essentially, a few bad apples often spoil the bunch.

“Too often, the comments sections of news sites are hijacked by a small group of pseudonymous commenters who replace smart, thoughtful dialogue with vitriolic personal insults and rote exchanges of partisan acrimony,” states Frumin.

Even if you don’t find that to be true (it is), it’s hard to argue with Frumin’s second point — that the best place to debate pieces is via social media, not comment sections:

Read more

Gift Subscriptions Boost The Week

The Week’s best salesmen just might be its subscribers. According to The New York Times, the news roundup magazine is getting quite a boost from current subscribers who send someone a subscription as a gift.

This year alone, 110,000 subscribers to The Week purchased 165,000 subscriptions. Over the past five years, gift subscriptions have jumped 35 percent, even with The Week increasing its subscription price by 30 percent. A subscription to the title runs anywhere from $40 to $60.

Sara O’Connor, The Week’s executive VP for consumer marketing, told the Times that part of its strategy is to “make our subscribers our advocates.”

It sure sounds like they’ve got that covered. Maybe this year you’ll get a subscription to The Week instead of holiday-themed hand towels. Again.

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