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Magazines

GQ Interviews Kanye West

GQ went full Kanye for its latest issue. The 37-year-old artist graces the glossy’s cover and was interviewed for an accompanying feature.

In the piece, West is typical West — meaning he says a lot of things that don’t make sense, makes a few comments that are truly insightful, and continues to take himself way too seriously.

Below are some of our favorite quotes from the interview. Try using some at the next party you attend and see how many people politely suggest that you stop drinking.

I’m fighting with the way I line my words up together and the way I place a sweater on top of a T-shirt.

The concept of Kimye has more cultural significance than what Page Six could write.

Even “Bound 2,” when the video came out, I think people’s apprehension—I mean, it’s the same as any other Kanye West video. You just have colorful bears running around. It was completely morphed and weird and psychedelic and really druggy. I would have just liked to have had more nudity in it. That’s the only thing. I just want to do crazy, colorful shit like that that has more nudity.

Janet Mock Named Marie Claire Contributing Editor

Marie Claire has added Janet Mock, a New York Times best-selling author and transgender rights activist, as a contributing editor. Mock will contribute print and online articles and act as a Marie Claire brand ambassador.

The move marks a bit of a return to Marie Claire for Mock. In a 2011 piece, she publicly came out as transgendered in a piece she wrote for the magazine told her story of growing up as a trans girl.

Mock is the author of the bestseller Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More and previously served as a staff editor for People.

“Janet is an incredibly smart and articulate writer,” said Marie Claire’s editor, Anne Fulenwider, in a statement. “Her ideas about identity, youth culture, and society’s changing norms about beauty illuminate the ever-evolving definition of the modern woman. I look forward to adding her unique point of view to our pages.”

The New Yorker Launches Revamped Website

The New Yorker’s website has a brand new look. The revamped newyorker.com has a good amount of white space — which makes reading easier — and highlights one featured article on the homepage and each subsection.

The updated newyorker.com is less difficult to navigate than the previous version. Each subsection is listed at the top of the page and new content is clearly marked under a section titled “The Latest.” The new site, according to a note from the glossy’s editors, gives staffers more flexibility when reacting to the news of the day.

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People Are Still Talking About That Essence Fest Blue Ivy Hair Debate

Essence2014FestLogoOn July 4 at the 2014 Essence Music Festival in New Orleans, there was a panel discussion featuring Soledad O’Brien, OWN series star Chenoa Maxwell, Real Housewives of Atlanta cast member Cynthia Bailey, We TV series star Kim Kimble, former Maybelline spokesperson Tomiko Frasier Hines and actress Wendy Raquel Robinson. At one point, the gathered group was asked to address the backlash on social media and elsewhere over baby Blue Ivy‘s natural-look hair:

“If I want to put [my daughter] Noel’s hair in an Afro and not comb it for a year, that’s my child and it’s not anyone’s problem,” said Bailey. “Blue is [Jay Z and Beyonce’s baby]… I think she’s beautiful and I don’t even look at her hair. I turn up when it comes to kids.”

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Oprah Will Send You a Birthday Card for $200

The staff behind O, The Oprah Magazine are doing something extremely smart. They’re taking advantage of people who are so obsessed with Oprah that they’d be willing to shell out cash for the illusion of being close to her. That’s the premise for O’s premium subscription model, titled “Circle of Friends.”

Circle of Friends has three levels. According to Adweek, readers can pay $39 a year for a newsletter and discounts on Oprah-curated products; $99 a year for a box of luxury items selected by the glossy’s editors; and $199 a year for tickets to Oprah’s “Life You Want Tour, a chance to test products for the magazine, and best of all — a birthday card from Oprah.

Lucy Kaylin, O’s editor, came up with the idea for Circle of Friends. “We quickly realized that this could be something incredibly special because there’s such a personal and passionate and almost idiosyncratic nature to the O brand with Oprah at its center,” she told Adweek.

That’s the nice way of saying “Oprah fans can be loopy, so why not squeeze some money out of them?”

[Image: Joe Seer / Shutterstock.com]

Tim Howard Graces Cover of Adweek

Tim Howard, the goalie for the US national soccer team, is Adweek’s latest cover star.

We’re not exactly sure that we’d call Howard a hero — he plays sports for a living and well, the US did lose — but he definitely made the World Cup worth watching.

Maybe instead of “Hero” Adweek should’ve gone with “Dude.” Seems a bit more accurate.

LeBron James Announces Cleveland Return Via Sports Illustrated

This is what you call one hell of a get. Everyone in the sporting world — and many others outside of it — was awaiting word on where LeBron James would play next season, and Sports Illustrated got the scoop.

In an article by James (as told to SI’s Lee Jenkins), James explained his reasons for returning to Cleveland to play for the Cavs:

It holds a special place in my heart. People there have seen me grow up. I sometimes feel like I’m their son. Their passion can be overwhelming. But it drives me. I want to give them hope when I can. I want to inspire them when I can. My relationship with Northeast Ohio is bigger than basketball. I didn’t realize that four years ago. I do now.

You can bet this essay is going to break some of SI’s page view records.

Congrats to everyone at the magazine. You should all get to call it a day.

Marcy Bloom on How She Became Condé Nast’s Youngest Publisher

Marcy-Bloom-ArticleMarcy Bloom is a publishing veteran, having worked at numerous glossies like Self, GQ, Teen People and Lucky. After taking a year off to volunteer abroad, Bloom hit the ground running with her current gig as senior vice president and group publisher of Modern Luxury.

In our latest So What Do You Do column, Bloom talks with Mediabistro managing editor Valerie Berrios about the changing landscape of modern advertising and how she became Condé Nast’s youngest publisher while at Lucky:

One [reason was] putting a lot of pressure on myself. [Having] a lot of amazing mentors, and quite frankly, Condé was such a great experience for me. We loved what we were doing at GQ. I learned a ton from the brand and my bosses there. And when you’re loving what you’re doing it’s easy to grow and work hard, and so with a lot of support from my management and the corporate management — they really put me [in that position at Lucky]. I think if you work hard and your intentions are great and you know what you’re looking to accomplish, people respond.

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Royal Baby Prince George Lands Vanity Fair Cover

Prince George hasn’t even celebrated his first birthday yet, but he’s already snagged his first Vanity Fair cover. This is quite an achievement, because it’s not like VF has an unnatural obsession with the British monarchy.

The cover promises “exclusive” articles inside, such as “How the future king spent year one.” We don’t have the exclusive access VF does, but have a rough idea what George was doing: eating, crying, sleeping, shitting and peeing. That’s it. We’re sure the piece is riveting though.

The New Yorker to Launch New Paywall

Beginning July 21, The New Yorker’s content — dating back to 2007 — will be available for all to read online. We suggest you take advantage of this, because in three months, the glossy is closing everything back up; sealed behind a new, metered paywall.

The New York Times reports that the motivation behind opening up newyorker.com was to find out how readers interacted with the site, and then use that data to construct the revamped paywall. The magazine also hopes to add subscribers via the promotion.

We’re excited about this idea, because in the past, it was almost pointless to go to The New Yorker’s site unless you were a subscriber. You never really knew which articles would be available to non-subscribers, and the selection was always minimal.

David Remnick, the magazine’s editor, admitted as much. He told the Times that their method for selecting magazine content that was available online was “awkward” and had “long since outlived its conception.”

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